Marcos Valle – O cantor e o compositor (1965)

Photobucket
Photobucket

MARCOS VALE
O COMPOSITOR E O CANTOR
1965 on Odeon (SMOFB-3413)
Reissue in 2011 on EMI (026461-2) (SET 026447-2)

1 Gente (Paulo Sérgio Valle, Marcos Valle)
2 Preciso aprender a ser só (Paulo Sérgio Valle, Marcos Valle)
3 Seu encanto (Paulo Sérgio Valle, Pingarrilho, Marcos Valle)
4 Passa por mim (Paulo Sérgio Valle, Marcos Valle)
5 Samba de verão (Paulo Sérgio Valle, Marcos Valle)
6 A resposta (Paulo Sérgio Valle, Marcos Valle)
7 Deus brasileiro (Paulo Sérgio Valle, Marcos Valle)
8 Dorme profundo (Pingarrilho, Marcos Valle)
9 Vem (Luiz Fernando Freire, Marcos Valle)
10 Mais amor (Paulo Sérgio Valle, Marcos Valle)
11 Perdão (Paulo Sérgio Valle, Marcos Valle)
12 Não pode ser (Paulo Sérgio Valle, Marcos Valle)
BONUS TRACKS
13. Vamos pranchar
14. Deus brasileiro (instrumental)
15. Não pode ser (instrumental)

Marcos Valle – voice and piano
Eumir Deodato – arrangements, orchestrations, piano and organ
Sergio Barroso – bass
Wilson das Neves, Dom Um Româo – drums
Nelson Ângelo – acoustic guitar
Rubens Bassini – percussion
Hamilton and Maurílio Santos – trumpet
Edson Maciel – trombone
Jorginho – alto sax
Jt. Meirelles, Walter Rosa – tenor sax
Aurino Ferreira – baritone sax

Produced by Milton Miranda
Musical direction – Lyrio Panicalli
Technical superviso – Z.J. Merky
Sound engineer – Jorge Teixeira ROcha
Layout – Moacry Rocha
COver photo – Mafra

2011 Info
Project curator and producer: Charles Gavin
Supervision: Marcos Valle
Texts by Marcos Valle
Remastered from original tapes by Ricardo Garcia at Magic Master Studios, RJ
Assistant engineer: Matheus Gomes

———————

This is album is a leap ahead of his first album and situated firmly in jazz-bossa with some traces of innovative pop that would become more prominent in his work later. It also has what is may be the most perfect composition of his entire career: “Preciso aprender a ser só” (I Need To Learn To Be Alone). “Samba de verão” is undoubtedly the most reinterpreted song in his catalog, recorded by a bunch of other artists afterwards includes several version of English.. “Deus brasileiro”, “Dorme profundo” lush and shimmery and wonderful. A lot of the same ‘heavy hitters’ from the debut are playing on this album too, with the added bonus of Wilson das Neves and Dom Um Romão on the drums. Also notice a young Nelson Angelo on acoustic guitar. Anybody know who is playing flute on this album (perhaps one of the saxophonists doubling on flute?) — they are not credited in the notes. But kudos to this reissue project for including musician credits in the first place, as these earlier Odeon releases did NOT include ‘backing musicians’ in general, although arrangers usually took pride of place.

Listen to how HARD the ensemble swings on “Seu encanto” and it ought to put to rest any remaining critics (are they any still living?) who thought bossa nova was overly-influenced by or even ‘imitating’ North American jazz: this song is equal to anything recorded elsewhere in its jazz credentials. Goddamn the ruffing is amazing. Just wish I knew who played the flute on it. The tune “Vem” qualifies for this premium category.

As blogger friend Le Porce Rouge put it, it seems as if every album recorded in Brazil after 1965 had a cover version of a track off this album. It’s influence must have been huge like a musical atom bomb in the climate of 1965, when bossa nova was struggling to redefine itself in a changing musical landscape. The Brothers Valle seemed unconcerned with all that and simply forged ahead with what they wanted to do, categories be damned. The record was successful enough to draw attention of music executives from abroad, who began clambering at Marcos (and Paulo’s) door to bring them to the US and record, after the likes of people like Johnny Mathis and Connie Francis (!!!) had recorded hit versions of “Samba de verão.” It is kind of a shame, since Marcos had only just ‘hit his stride’ with this album and it would be a few years before he recorded again on Brazilian soil. In the USA he would make a delightful little album, “Samba 68”, but also a dreadful little one called “Braziliance!”, and then find his way back home.

The bonus tracks feature the B-side “Vamos prenchar” which was released on the single (compato) for ‘Samba de verão’, and the instrumental takes of “Dues brasileiro” and “Não pode ser”.

Amidst all the greatness on the record, the tune “Dorme profundo” is very special to me as the ‘sleeper’ cut that somehow distills the best of what the album has to offer to me.

In regards to the sound quality issues pawlyshyn mentioned concerning the (expensive) Japanese remasters, I regret to inform you that at least some of those problems remain so perhaps it is a problem with the tapes. “Dorme profundo” has a drop-out, for example, at 1 minute and 36 seconds in the right channel. I’m pretty sure there are a few others scattered around. The is some distortion in places in the upright bass and drums but I’ve become accustomed to it on the Odeon releases from this period — they needed a Rudy Van Gelder to set them straight on how to record the rhythm section of jazz combos with proper separation. But as far as digital distortions go, I haven’t noticed any yet but since I have only had this box for two weeks, feel free to point them out if you come across them. Usually they jump out at a person, but I haven’t noticed any yet.

The back of the album jacket had original liner notes by Paulo Sérgio which unfortunately are only reproduced in microscopic form in the CD artwork. But I’ve taken the liberty of translating them here:

“”Marcos composes in the middle of the night. For this reason his sambas have the flavor of ‘saudade’ for the end of night, waiting for the day to be born. They are songs of love, that demand poetry in the lyrics in place of shouts of revolution, as some people want. It is true that sometimes this exremely lyrical composer has his moments of realism, like in “Gente”, for example. But without capitulating to some type of pre-fabricated formula. It is what we would like to call “lyrical realism.” As a singer, Marcos creates a contagious intimacy. There is nobody better suited to sing his own songs, that come to us still warm from his heart. It is one of the privleges of the singer-composer. On this album we again have the partnership of Marcos and Eumir Deodator, arranger of choice. They are two friends united by a perfect musical identification, by talent, and by the seriousness engraved on everything they do. Here they put into practice what for so long they have studied: the union of heart and technique. In the orchestration of Eumir and the singing of Marcos is the voice of poetry.”
-Paulo Sergio Valle, original liner notes
free translation by Flabbergasted Enterprises

Enjoy this one, folks.

in 320 kernals-per-bite audio

in FLAC LOSL3SS AUDIO

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9 Comments

  1. password:
    vibes

  2. Thanks so much for this. A joy to hear this so clear. Love the orchestrations.

  3. MARAVILHOSO !!!THANK YOU

  4. What always amazed me most about this album is the sheer mass of first class songs here. Tracks 1-7 all became staples of the bossa nova songbook, all where covered several times. "Samba de verão" sure was the internationally most often played tune from Marcos, while "Preciso" has plenty of versions from fellow Brasilian artists.

    I just wish they had followed the Japanese edition with the bonus tracks, as the Jap. version of this album contains wonderful vocal versions of the single-only tunes "Batucada Surgiu" and "É Preciso Cantar" (which is otherwise only available in English on "Samba 68").

    P.S.: according to http://www.discosdobrasil.com.br the flute player is Paul Winter.

    Big thanks for this classic!

  5. If that's Paul Winter on flute I'll eat my hat!
    Try Copinha.
    kind regards

  6. Copinha makes a lot more sense seeing as he played on the previous album….

  7. Quimsy and Flabbergast:
    I also think the flute player is Copinha. Paul Winter was indeed living in Rio in 1965, but I think, Marcos Valle would remember his appearence on this session.
    Le Porc Rouge: The bonus tracks of the Japanese edition are on the lost session CD.
    These tracks appear on also on a Odeon compacto duplo.

    Frank-Oliver

  8. Invalid Link

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