The Alegre All-Stars – The Alegre All-Stars (1961)

The Alegre All Stars – s/t
Vinyl transfer in 24-bit/192 kHz | FLAC |  300 dpi scans | Latin, Descarga, Salsa
1961 Alegre Records LPA-810 || Repress, 1960s/70s || Mono

This is the first of several albums made by The Alegre All Stars and the only one with Johnny Pacheco on flute, who  left the label to form Fania soon after.  It features Charlie Palmieri on piano and Barry Rogers on trombone.  It a big way, it set the template for what would become known as “salsa”. The vocalists are no slouches either: Dioris Valladares, Yayo “El Indio” Paquero, and Rudy Calzado were all well-known in their day and deserve more renown.  The album features lots of studio banter and even the sound of drinks being poured: the informal atmosphere was deliberate, with aim to capturing the kind of vibe that Israel ‘Cahcao’ Lopez had on his famous Cuban “descarga” sessions. Continue reading

Bootsy Collins – Ultra Wave (1980)

Bootsy Collins – Ultra Wave
1980 Warner Bros. Records BSK 3433

Since the end of summer I have been toiling away in a pretty consistent cloud of funk.  Not the kind for which William Collins is famous either, but of the variety that leaves a person questioning their life choices while coughing through a miasma of regrets.  To be honest, not even music has brought much pleasure to me lately, nor has putting time I don’t really have into this blog which has stubbornly persisted long past any relevance.   I mean who really needs to hear what I do or don’t have to say about any given music when you no doubt have an algorithm tethered to your digital aura which can recommend you some music with more granular accuracy than one lone, mediocre mortal.

None of this has stopped me from continuing to buy records, in fact – like many people, it seems — I’ve bought more records during this pandemic than I actually have time to listen to, because there has been fuck all else to do.

At the beginning of this month we lost Ronnie Wilson of The Gap Band, but Boosty Collins also turned 80 years old.  So it all evens out, I guess?   This is an under-appreciated Bootsy Collins effort starting of a new decade for the king of space bass.  I had only ever had digital copies of it for some reason until recently stumbling on a pristine vinyl copy in my new favorite record haunt.   I think Side 2 has some of the most out-there stuff Bootsy has ever done. The first side is also pretty great with the possible exception of the tune ‘Is That My Song?’.  As to be expected, the album features a host of the expanded P-Funk family including brother Catfish Collins as well as The Brides of Funkenstein and Parlet on backing vocals.

A1 – Mug Push (03:49)
A2 – F – Encounter (07:35)
A3 – Is That My Song? (03:42)
A4 – It’s A Musical (04:47)
B1 – Fat Cat (07:03)
B2 – Sacred Flower (06:48)
B3 – Sound Crack (07:06)

Total length: 40:50

 

 

More information: https://www.discogs.com/release/224271-Bootsy-Ultra-Wave

Published By – Mash-A-Mug Music
Published By – Rubber Band Music, Inc.
Phonographic Copyright ℗ – Warner Bros. Records Inc.
Pressed By – Capitol Records Pressing Plant, Los Angeles
Mastered At – Allen Zentz Mastering

Credits

Arranged By – Casper? Who*
Arranged By [Horn Arrangement By] – Bootsy*, Fred Wesley
Bass [Bass Things] – Casper? Who*
Bass [Space Bass] – Ystoob? Who*
Design, Illustration – R. Bangham*
Drums – Bootsy? Who*, Jerry Jones (2) (tracks: A2)
Guitar – Bootsy Collins, Casper? Who*, Catfish Collins, Rick Evans (7) (tracks: A2)
Horns [Horny Horns] – Fred Wesley, Larry Hatcher, Maceo Parker, Richard Griffith
Keyboards – David Lee Chong, Joel Johnson (tracks: A2 to B3), Mark Johnson (tracks: A2)
Percussion – Carl “Butch” Small (tracks: A2 to B3), Casper? Who*
Photography By, Art Direction – Diem M. Jones*
Producer – Bootsy Collins, George Clinton
Vocals – Brandy*, The Brides*, Casper? Who*, Godmoma, Parlet, Robert P-Nut Johnson*

Notes
This version is the Los Angeles pressing plant variation and can be identified by LW on the runout, and by the pressing ring.

Released with b/w printed inner sleeve with pictures and credits.

 

funny cartoon sign of a butcher with sausages

 

password: vibes

Salah Ragab & The Cairo Jazz Band – Egypt Strut (1974) (2021 RSD Strut reissue)


Salah Ragab & The Cairo Jazz Band – Egypt Strut
Vinyl rip in 24-bit/192 kHz | FLAC & mp3|  300 dpi scans | Jazz
2021 RSD Strut Records , Ltd. ed 3000 copies | Original release 1974

 

Original copies of this flabbergasting bit of rare groove jazz, released by the Egyptian Ministry of Culture,  change hands for thousands of dollars. It’s seen a couple of CD releases but was reissued as a double LP with extras by Strut Records for RSD 2021 with a later, single-LP version planned for the fall. But forget the scarcity factor: the music is jaw-dropping good, like Lalo Schifrin met Perez Prado and early Sun Ra for a jam at the Great Pyramids.  Continue reading

Celia Cruz and Willie Colón – Celia y Willie (1981) (2021 Craft Recordings)

Celia Cruz y Willie Colón – Celia y Willie
Vinyl rip in 24-bit/192 kHz | FLAC  & mp3|  300 dpi scans | Latin, Salsa
2021 Craft Recordings CR00375 || RSD, limited to 2000 copies ||
Original release 1981 Vaya

 

The cover may seem to invoke the glory days of the Palladium (or perhaps even the Cotton Club), but the music on this album fits mostly comfortably with any ‘salsa dura’ recorded during the 1970’s peak of that style, albeit with a bit less jamming and more focus on fitting a lot of vocals into 47 minutes.  Continue reading

Lonnie Smith – Think! with Lee Morgan & David Newman (1969)

Lonnie Smith
Think!
Original release 1969 Blue Note
This 2019 reissue, Blue Note 80 Vinyl Reissue Series

This week the world of music lost one of the greats of the jazz organ, “Dr.” Lonnie Smith.  I regret never having caught him live during his return to the spotlight, as he had quite the career.  He was part of a second (or third?) wave of soul-jazz organists that hit the scene in the latter half of the 1960s. Continue reading

Tito Puente – The Latin World of Tito Puente (1964, Mono)

Mambos, cha chas, son montunos, pachangas, Latin jazz… Tito Puente played all of those, and he apparently never liked the catch-all term “salsa” (and he stayed out of Fania Records’ orbit, for the most part).  And he has a point – each of the sub-genres and rhythms (and there are many more than those listed here) have their own backstory and sensibility….

Continue reading