Jorge Ben – Ben (1972) {Salve Jorge! boxset}


A1 Morre O Burro Fica O Homem 2:09
A2 O Circo Chegou 2:46
A3 Paz E Arroz 2:48
A4 Moça 4:57
A5 Domingo 23 3:48
A6 Fio Maravilha 2:13

B1 Quem Cochicha O Rabo Espicha 3:25
B2 Caramba 2:21
B3 Que Nega E Essa 3:34
B4 As Rosas Eram Todas Amarelas 3:45
B5 Taj Mahal 5:30

For me, this has always been the Holy Grail of Jorge Ben albums. A sentiment fueled largely by its scarcity since the time I got into the man’s music — This was one of the last of the classic Ben albums I managed to hear. I finally got my hands on it by way of an ex-girlfriend, and (not unlike the girl herself) it was damaged goods — the disc was scratched up and skipped, the cover artwork had long disappeared. But (not unlike the girl herself), it was better than nothing, and I made a personal copy of it anyway, skips and all. The vinyl for this baby has long been out of my price range (until I am lucky enough to find one at a random record stall), so this particular title is one of the main reasons I bought the Salve Jorge boxset.

A set of eleven songs, all written entirely by Jorge Ben, with unfortunately uncredited musicians after the departure of Trio Mocotó. Whoever it is playing the fretless bass on this album is just incredible. Crisp production and arrnangements by Paulinho Tabajós (with some help from Osmar Milito on a few tracks), this is probably the sparest, most stripped-down album of Ben’s discography. For all its wonderful glory, there are actually few ‘staples’ on this album that would continue to appear in Jorge’s live performances and various collections, with the major exceptions of Fio Maravilha (here presented in an extremely laid back, downbeat interpretation), Caramba!, and the earliest version of Taj Mahal which has an “Eastern-sounding” acoustic guitar solo in the middle of it.

Also, if you play the song Domingo 23 backwards, you will here references to the future death / murder of Michael Jackson, using imagery from the film BEN for which Jackson sang the theme song, also released in 1972.

Saravá Jorge, filho de Ogun!

Oh, and this is most likely my last blog post of 2009, so … HAPPY NEW YEAR!!!! Thanks to all the readers of this blog — especially those of you kind enough to take the time to leave comments! Lots of light and inspiration to you all in the new aeon.

mp3 icon

password: vibes

 

Emílio Santiago – Emílio Santiago (1975) {João Donato, Azimuth, Wilson das Neves..)


Emilio Santiago (1975)
1975, CID (8008)
CD Reissue, CID (0074102)1 Bananeira
(Gilberto Gil, João Donato)
2 Quero alegria
(Guilherme de Brito, Nelson Cavaquinho)
3 Porque somos iguais
(Pedro Camargo, Durval Ferreira)
4 Batendo a porta
(Paulo César Pinheiro, João Nogueira)
5 Depois
(Otávio Daher, Ivan Lins)
6 Brother
(Jorge Ben)
7 La mulata
(Paulo Sergio Valle, Marcos Valle)
8 Nega Dina
(Zé Keti)
9 Doa a quem doer
(Ivan Lins)
10 Sessão das dez
(Édson Lobo, Tita, Renato Rocha)

 

Truth be told, I am not a huge fan of Emilio Santiago. In fact all I have is this album, ‘Comigo é assim’ and `Feito Pra Ouvir` which might be his most famous from the 70s. But his early stuff is worth checking out, especially this debut album. This one is, in fact, pretty bad-ass. Emilio was sort of a protege, or at least a `discovery` of Roberto Menescal, who wrote the liner notes for this album and produced `Feito Pra Ouvir` a few years later.

In truth this album may be most interested for the insane lineup of musicians who contributed to it. João Donato’s contribution on the electric Rhodes is the most obvious — as is the song he co-wrote with Gilberto Gil, “Bananeira”, as solid a piece of Brazil funk as you could find. Donato also gives the track “La mulata” (penned by the brothers Valle) a salsa-style arrangement that stands out quite nicely. The funk-fusion band Azimuth provides backing on one track only, Jorge Ben’s “Brother.” Now, ‘Brother’ is from what many regard as Ben’s best album ever — A Tábua de Esmeralda — but for me that song has always been the weakest link in the great chain of that record. Here, I dare say that Emilio may surpass the original, and with big credit due to Azimuth, who make the song hit much harder than Ben’s laid-back style.

You can see the rest of the big names who helped out on this record on the CD tray like Wilson das Neves, Copinha, Ivan Lins, Dori Caymmi… Keeping in mind that the lineup of the musical backing changes on every track, sometimes entirely, the album is remarkably consistent in its sound. Emilio’s interpretations of sambas from the likes of Nelson Cavaquinho and João Nogueira are still growing on me, and perhaps they never will… His voice veers towards the schmaltzy style that would make him famous in the 80s and 90s. He is definitely not alone in giving classic samba that kind of slick treatment, but I will always prefer ‘samba do morro’ to ‘samba de calçada’ I guess..

By the way, his name is Emilio Santiago, in case you can’t read it clearly on the front cover of the album.  Bio in Portuguese

Carioca, começou a cantar em festivais universitários nos anos 70, quando freqüentava a faculdade de Direito. Participou também de programas de calouros na televisão, chegando às finais de um concurso no programa Flávio Cavalcanti, na TV Tupi. Foi crooner da orquestra de Ed Lincoln, e cantou em boates e casas noturnas. Seu primeiro compacto foi lançado em 1973 com “Transa de Amor” (S. Tapajós/ M. Amaral) e “Saravá Nega” (Odibar), o que abriu portas para participações em programas de rádio e televisão. Dois anos depois a CID grava o primeiro LP, “Emílio Santiago”, com músicas de Jorge Ben (“Brother”), João Donato (“Bananeira”) e outros. No ano seguinte assinou contrato com a Polygram, que lançou os dez discos seguintes. Foi eleito o melhor intérprete do Festival da TV Globo de 1985 com a música “Elis Elis” (E. Natolo Jr./ M. Simões). Em 1988 mudou para a gravadora Som Livre, onde iniciou o projeto “Aquarelas Brasileiras”, dedicado exclusivamente ao repertório de música brasileira. Lançou sete discos pelo projeto, alcançando a marca de 4 milhões de cópias vendidas. No final da década de 90 lançou discos fora do Aquarela Brasileira, inclusive um em homenagem ao cantor Dick Farney.

 

flac button

password: vibes

(edit/update, March 20, 2013 – Emílio passed away today, only in his 60s too..  So I fixed the links here and reposted, but without any other changes.  Maybe in the coming weeks I’ll try to get another of his records up here..)

Baden Powell – Swings with Jimmy Pratt (1963)

“Baden Powell Swings with Jimmy Pratt”
Elenco ME-4, 1963

Musicians: Baden Powell (git)
Jorge “Jorginho” Ferreira da Silva, Copinha (fl)
Moacir Santos (sax, vcl)
Sandoval (cl)
Sergio Barroso (b)
Jimmy Pratt (dr)
Rubem Bassini (perc)
unknown piano playerProduction: Aloysio de Oliveira
Direction: Jimmy Pratt
Production Manager: Peter Keller
Studio: Philips of Brasil
Sound Engineer: Norman Sternberg
Recording Technician: Celio Martins
Cover Layout: Cesar G. Villela
Photos: Francisco Pereira

Guitar Model: Author 3 by luthier Reinaldo DiGiorgio

Also issued as: Developments (LP, 1970)
O Mestre do Violao Brasileiro (CD-Box, 2003)

——————————————————-

Flabbergasted Vinyl Transfer Specs:

Original Elenco (ME-4) pressing -> Pro-Ject RM-5SE turntable / Sumiko Blue Point 2 cartridge / Pro-Ject Speedbox power supply -> Creek OBH-18 MM Phono Preamp -> M-Audio Audiophile 2496 soundcard. Recorded at 24-bit / 96 khz resolution to Audacity. Click Repair on very light settings to remove some clicks and popsm, some manual click removal using Audition. Track splitting in Adobe Audition 3.0. Dithered to 16-bit using iZotope M-Bit noise-shaping. Converted to FLAC and mp3 using DbPoweramp. ID tags done with Foobar2000.

——————————————————————


——————————————————————-
I don’t know anything about Jimmy Pratt other than he plays the skins on a whole bunch of jazz records from the 40s and 50s, having done sessions with Charlie Parker, Stan Getz, Zoot Sims, Oscar Pettiford, Bud Shank, and Anita O’Day. Busy guy. But this record may be one of the most famous he played on. Partly because he essentially receives co-billing on the marquee with Baden. But also he was, in a way, in the right place at the right time to really connect with the Bossa Nova explosion.

From the back cover:

“When the drummer Jimmy Pratt was in Brazil accompanying Caterina Valente, he heard Baden play guitar like everyone that was exposed to Baden’s art, he was profoundly enthusiastic. The enthusiasm provoked the idea for this recording. And from the recording was also born a friendship and mutual admiration between the two artists. ‘Baden Powell Swings with Jimmy Pratt’ is a tribute from Baden to his friend and American colleague.” – Aloysio de Oliveira

The observent among might notice Mr. Pratt apparently did not make the photo session for the album or else closely guards his image against potential feitiço and witchcraft.. He is absent from the shots taken in the recording studio, unless we are looking at the back of his head in the shot where Vinicius de Moraes appears for no particular reason — it’s an instrumental record bereft of his lovely lyrics, he didn’t play anything, and he only has a writing credit on the very first tune, ‘Deve Ser Amor.’ Anyway, I find it amusing.

In the photo to the right of this we see Baden playing into a Neumann U-87 microphone, and looking like he wants to walk into the control room and slap somebody. I’m not sure why because it’s a great-sounding recording.

Fantastic playing from everyone involved, including Moacir Santos who contributes his own compositions, Coisas No.1 and Coisas No.2. It`s the clarinet, however, that really slays me on this record: while doing the vinyl transfer and processing, I swear I listened to Coisas No.1 about ten times in a row at one point. When you hear it you will know why. There is nothing groovier on earth.

mp3 icon   flac button

24bit

 

Antonio Adolfo e Brazuca (1970) REPOST

 

adolfo

Créditos:
Antônio Adolfo: Piano, Piano Elétrico, Arranjos
Luiz Cláudio Ramos: Guitarras
Luizão Maia: Baixo
Paulo Braga: Bateria
Bimba: Vocais
Luiz Keller: Vocais

This record starts out mellow, low-key.. fairly normal, laid-back MPB for 1970. But by the time you make your way a few cuts in, on the track “Tribute to Victor Manga,” you realize this is an extraordinary album. With vocals that are often in tension with the lush and careful arrangements, with a lot melodic interplay, and with sharp, crisp and always-interesting production, and anchored in the tight rhythm-section of Luizão Maia and Paulo Braga, this is one of the best put-together Brazilian albums of 1970. This is no accident, as Adolfo is probably most famous as an arranger, although for those of us who compulsively read writing credits will have noticed his name cropping up on records by the likes of Toni Tornado (his biggest hit, “B.R. 3”, was penned by Adolfo), Wilson Simonal, and even Elis Regina. On this album, tracks like “Que se dane” with its sarcastic lyrics and funky-as-hell Wurlitzer sounds give way to even stranger pieces like ‘Atenção, atenção!” and the barbs of ‘Transamazonica’. Some very groovy female vocals all over this too. Adolfo would make more ‘respectable’ music of a jazz variety in the later seventies, and these days he runs his own music school and still puts out records every now and again.

The Rhodes electric piano on this album is off the hook. And as Simon says, there is never enough Rhodes in the world..

Dusty Groove says
A lost treasure from Antiono Adolfo — keyboard player, arranger, and one of the greatest Brazilian talents of his generation! Adolfo’s sound and style is contemporaneous with the best work of Marcos Valle, Edu Lobo, and others — and like them, he has an approach that mixes together jazz, MPB, baroque orchestrations, easy scoring, and a bit of funk — similar to the best work of the Blue Brazil generation on EMI/Odeon Records. The approach is one that’s rarely been matched by any other artist — and it’s a strong reason why Adolfo’s records from this period are extremely sought after in the world of collectors. This beautiful album from 1970 has Adolfo working with the group A Brazuca — who bring some wonderful vocal harmonies to the set, mixing with strings, guitars, and some great electric piano work from Adolfo. Includes the breezy classic “Transamazonica”, plus the cuts “Que Se Dane”, “Atencao Atencao”, “Claudia”, “Panorama”, “Tributo A Victor Manga”, “Caminhada”, “Grilopus No 1”, and “Cotidiano”.

 

Adolfo’s bio in English from his own page:

Antonio Adolfo is an important composer, having written songs recorded by Nara Leao, Marisa Gata Mansa, Angela Ro Ro, Wilson Simonal, Ivete Sangalo, Leci Brandao, Emilio Santiago, Beth Carvalho, Sergio Mendes & Brasil ’66, Stevie Wonder and Herb Alpert among others. Adolfo also had a noted role in the process of making important music available through independent production, through the creation of the pioneer independent label Artezanal. His recordings of important and almost-forgotten composers of the belle epoque, like Chiquinha Gonzaga, Ernesto Nazareth and Joao Pernambuco, are noted cultural initiatives. As an arranger, he worked for Leci Brandao, Angela Ro Ro, Elizeth Cardoso, Emilio Santiago, Fatima Guedes, Marcos Valle, Mongol, Nara Leao, O Grupo, Ruy Maurity (his brother), Sueli Costa, Vinicius Cantuaria, Rita Lee, Zeze Motta, and others.

The son of Yolanda Maurity, a music teacher and violinist of the orchestra of the Teatro Municipal do Rio de Janeiro, Antonio Adolfo began to study music very early. At seven, he began his violin studies with Paulina D’Ambrozzio. At 15, he took up piano, studying with Amyrton Vallim and with the internationally renowned Eumir Deodato. In 1963, he joined the group Samba Cinco, which performed in the famous Beco das Garrafas on Rio’s 52nd street. In 1964 Adolfo was invited by Carlos Lyra and Vinicius de Moraes to be a musician for their play Pobre Menina Rica (at Teatro de Bolso), beginning to accompany important names of MPB. Adolfo formed the group 3-D for that gig, and continued to perform with it until 1968, having recorded four LPs. In that year, he became acquainted with Tiberio Gaspar, with whom he wrote important songs such as “Juliana,” “Sa Marina,” “Teletema,” and “BR-3.” “Caminhada” made it to the finals of the II FIC (Rio’s International Song Contest), 1967. The next year, Wilson Simonal recorded “Sa Marina” with success. In that year “Visao” was included in the III FIC. In 1969 Adolfo accompanied Elis Regina in her tour through Europe. Back to Brazil in the same year, he wrote music for soap operas and participated in the IV FIC (1969) with “Juliana” (written with Tiberio). The song was defended by Adolfo’s group A Brazuca, and took second place. With that group he toured Brazil and Peru, recording two albums through Odeon. In 1970, “Teletema” (with Tiberio) took second place in an International Festival (Song Olympiad) in Athens, Greece, in Evinha’s interpretation, which achieved popular success also in Brazil. “BR-3” won the national phase of the V FIC, in Toni Tornado’s interpretation. In 1971 Adolfo moved to the U.S.. In 1972 he returned to Brazil, beginning to write alone, and recording Antonio Adolfo (Philips). In that year he studied with David Baker at Indiana University. Adolfo was a member of the band that backed Elis Regina in two European tours, finding time in between for a stint with the classical Nadia Boulanger, having studied also with Guerra Peixe and Esther Scliar. Back in Brazil, he developed his career as pianist, arranger, and producer. But even more deserving of attention is his work as a pioneer in the independent production field, which awakened artists and public to the necessity of opening alternative routes to non-commercial productions. In 1977 he launched his independent label Artezanal with the album Feito em Casa, with only originals. Encontro Musical, released in the same year, brought again originals and only one song, “Sa Marina,” written together with Tiberio. The album had the participation of Joyce and Erasmo Carlos. Viralata (1979) had mainly originals, and Continuidade had special guests. The albums were propelled by shows throughout Brazil, together with artists like Tiao Neto, Vitor Assis Brasil, Carmelia Alves, Oswaldinho do Acordeom, Alaide Costa, Sidney Miller, Walter Queiroz, and Danilo Caymmi, among others. In 1984 Adolfo released through the label Funarte a tribute album dedicated to the compositions of Joao Pernambuco, with participation of No em Pingo D’agua. In 1985 he paid tribute to Chiquinha Gonzaga, a seminal Brazilian female conductor, pianist, and composer, interpreting her songs in Viva Chiquinha Gonzaga, with participation of Nilson Chaves and Vital Lima. The album Os Pianeiros is dedicated to belle epoque piano composers. In the same year he participated in the first Carioca experience of teaching popular music/jazz in the Centro Calouste Gulbenkian, together with Pascoal Meirelles, Helio Delmiro, Ary Piassarollo, Paulo Russo, and others. Seeing the potential of the sector, he opened his Centro Musical Antonio Adolfo, also developing workshops in the U.S. and Europe. Adolfo published music education material in Brazil and abroad, including the video Secrets of Brazilian Music and two books with companion CD Brazilian Music Workshop (1996) and Phrasing In Brazilian Music (2007), both published by Advance Music, together with seven other books through Lumiar publishing (Brazil). In 1996 he received the Premio Sharp award for his instrumental composition “Cristalina,” from his album Cristalino (1993). In 1997 released Chiquinha com Jazz (Artezanal), which also was awarded the Premio Sharp, and so was the album Antonio Adolfo. Since then Adolfo released the CDs Puro Improviso, Viralata, Feito em Casa, Os Pianeiros, Carnaval Piano Blues and Anatonio Adolfo & Carol Saboya Ao vivo/Live, this one was released both in Brasil and in the US.

 flac button

Elis Regina – Como e Porque (1969)

elis regina

ELIS REGINA
“Como e porque”
Released 1969 on Philips

1 Aquarela Do Brasil/Nega Do Cabelo Duro (Barroso, Nasser, Soares) 3:02
2 O Sonho (Gismonti) 2:20
3 Vera Cruz (Borges, Nascimento) 2:34
4 Casa Forte (Lobo) 2:47
5 Canto de Ossanha (DeMoraes, Powell) 3:25
6 Giro (Adolfo, Gaspar) 2:16
7 O Barquinho (Boscoli, Menescal) 2:06
8 Andança (Caymmi, Souto, Tapajós) 3:14
9 Récit de Cassard [Do Filme “Les Parapluies de Cherbourg”] (Demy, Legrand) 2:52
10 Samba da Pergunta (Pingarilho, Vasconcellos) 1:32
11 Memórias de Marta Saré (Guarnieri, Lobo) 3:17

Along with her record from 1968, this is my favorite of her 1960s records. Arrangements by Roberto Menescal make this album unique in her discography. Menescal also contributes the most famous tuned he penned with friend Ronaldo Boscoli — “O Barquinho”, a tune written for Nara Leão, but stolen by Maysa when she stole Boscoli from her… Elis doesn’t surpass Maysa’s smoky rendition, but it’s still a delight for the ears.

Look at the eclectic songwriting credits on this one and you get an idea of how wonderful this record is — Ary Barroso, a young Egberto Gismonti, Lô Borgest/Milton Nascimento before they were household names, Edu Lobo, Baden Powell & vinicius, Antonio Adolfo (one of Brazil’s best kept secrets), Dori Caymmi. The two compositions here by Edu Lobo, who had quickly become Elis’ favored composer of this era, are among his best work: the wordless-but-vocalized Casa Forte, and the propulsive Memórias de Marta Saré. The latter closes the album and leaves you wanting more, a characterstic this album shares with its predeccesor from 68 but which all but her best records from the 70’s, in their usually-more downbeat melancholic moods, tend to lack.

  mp3 icon   flac button

password: vibes

 

Elis Regina – Elis Especial (1968)

PhotobucketELIS REGINA
“Elis Especial”
Released 1968 on PhilipsFrom the first measure of “Samba do Perdão”, this album has an excitement that it manages to maintain throughout the entire record. The Tom Jobim tribute, for whatever reason, did not impress me much the first time I heard it — perhaps it’s the way she rocks the “suingue” of ‘Vou Te Contar’ the second time around, which is now precisely the thing I love about it. I am a sucker for pretty much anything with a guitar played through an old Fender amp with the tremolo turned up somewhere between 8 and 10, and so the next track “De Onde Vens” just melts me. It’s also one of the earliest tracks of Elis Regina to feature and electric guitar at all, if I’m not mistaken. I could keep going like this, blow by blow and song by song, but you would do best to just give it a spin. The album features a choice repetoire of songs penned by the likes of Baden Powell, Dori Caymmi and Nelson Motta, Chico Buarque, Roberto Menescal and Ronaldo Bôscoli, Edu Lobo, Capinan, and Gilberto Gil (a pre-Tropicalia composition). The closing piece, a medley of songs in tribute to the Mangueira samba school, highlights one of Elis’s many skills, the ability to make you forget that her performances span virtually the entire recorded history of Brazilian music in her choice of material. It’s a shame that the session musicians are not credited, as they are really smoking throughout the entire album. Elis describes the recording session in the liner notes, saying that it felt like they were at home practicing, dimming the lights and getting loose. By the last few minutes of the Mangueira medley,when the rhythm section is doing dexterous somersaults in two different meters, I want to go shake Armando Pittigliani’s hand for leaving them all enough room to stretch out.01 – Samba do Perdão (Baden Powell / Paulo César Pinheiro)
02 – “Tributo a Tom Jobim” Vou Te Contar (Tom Jobim) Fotografia (Tom Jobim) Outra Vez (Tom Jobim) Vou Te Contar (Tom Jobim)
03 – De Onde Vens (Dori Caymmi / Nelson Motta)
04 – Bom Tempo (Chico Buarque)
05 – Da Cor do Pecado (Bororó)
06 – Corrida de Jangada (Edu Lobo / Capinan)
07 – Carta ao Mar (Roberto Menescal / Ronaldo Bôscoli)
08 – Vira-mundo (Gilberto Gil / Capinan)
09 – Upa Neguinho (Edu Lobo / Gianfrancesco Guarnieri)
10 – “Tributo à Mangueira” Mangueira (Assis Valente / Zequinha Reis) Fala Mangueira (Mirabeau / Milton de Oliveira) Exaltação à Mangueira (Enéas Brites da Silva / Aloísio Augusto da Costa) Levanta Mangueira (Luis Antônio) Despedida de Mangueira (Aldo Cabral / Benedito Lacerda) Pra Machucar Meu Coração (Ary Barroso)

Produced by Armando Pittigliani
Arrangements ay Erlon Chaves

The wonderfully memorable photo (in the note Elis writes that it was the best photo she ever had taken of her..) is by Hélio Santos for the magazine “Manchete.”

  mp3 icon   flac button

password: vibes