Herb Alpert & Hugh Masekela – Herb Alpert / Hugh Masekela (1978)

Herb Alpert and Hugh Masekela – Herb Alpert / Hugh Masekela
Vinyl rip in 24 bit 196 khz | Art at 600 and 300 dpi
24-bit 192 khz 1.29 GB |24-bit 96 khz – 688 MB |16-bit 44.1 khz – 232 MB
1978 Horizon / A&M Records Sp 728  |  Jazz-Funk / Jazz / African Continue reading

Gil Scott-Heron and Brian Jackson – From South Africa To South Carolina (1975)

Gil Scott-Heron and Brian Jackson
From South Africa to South Carolina
1975 Arista Records AL 4044

01 Johannesburg 4:47
02 A Toast To The People 5:45
03 The Summer Of ’42 4:38
04 Beginnings (The First Minute Of A New Day) 5:36
05 South Carolina (Barnwell) 4:33
06 Essex 9:19
07 Fell Together 4:26
08 A Lovely Day 3:25 Continue reading

Bobbi Humphrey – Blacks and Blues (1974) (24-bit 192 khz)

Bobbi Humphrey
Blacks And Blues
1974 Blue Note BN-LA142-G

Chicago, Damn  6:44
Harlem River Drive  7:24
Just A Love Child  8:21
Blacks And Blues  4:30
Jasper Country Man  5:16
Baby’s Gone  8:47

Recorded at Sound Factory Studios Hollywood, CA
Mastered at The Mastering Lab
Manufactured by United Artists Records, Inc.

Arranged By, Conductor – Larry Mizell
Backing Vocals and vocal arrangements – Fred Perron, Larry Mizell & Fonce Mizell
Clavinet, Trumpet – Fonce Mizell
Composed By – Larry Mizell
Congas – King Errison
Drums – Harvey Mason
Electric Bass  – Chuck Rainey, Ron Brown
Flute, Vocals [Solo] – Bobbi Humphrey
Guitar – David T. Walker, John Rowin
Percussion – Stephanie Spruill
Piano, Electric Piano [Fender Rhodes] – Jerry Peters
Synthesizer [Arp] – Fred Perren

Producer – Chuck Davis, Larry Mizell
Liner Notes – Leonard Brown
Photography By, Art Direction – Bob Cato
Engineer [Recording Assistant] – Chuck Davis, John Arias
Engineer [Recording] – John Mills
Engineer [Remix] – Chuck Davis, John Arias*, John Mills
Design – John Williams
Executive-Producer – George Butler

Notes
Recorded June 7 & 8, 1973 at Sound Factory, Hollywood, California.
Mastered at Mastering Lab, Hollywood, California.
Matrix / Runout (Runout Side 1 etched): 22 BN – LA 142 G – I
Matrix / Runout (Dead Wax Side 1 stamped): TML
Matrix / Runout (Runout Side 2 etched): 22 BN – LA 142 G – 2
Matrix / Runout (Dead Wax Side 2 stamped): TML

RIPPING INFO:
Blue Note BN-LA142-G vinyl; Pro-Ject RM-5SE with Audio Tecnica AT440-MLa cartridge; Speedbox power supply); Creek Audio OBH-15; Audioquest King Cobra cables; M-Audio Audiophile 192 Soundcard ; Adobe Audition at 32-bit float 192khz; clicks and pops removed with Click Repair on light settings, manually auditioning the output; further clicks removed with Adobe Audition 3.0; dithered and resampled using iZotope RX Advanced. Converted to FLAC in either Trader’s Little Helper or dBPoweramp. Tags done with Foobar 2000 and Tag and Rename.

 

This is one of the best records crafted by the production team of the Mizell Brothers for Blue Note, who also did notable albums for Donald Byrd, Freddie Hubbard, Johnny Hammond (for Salvation Records, a Motown subsidiary), and Gary Bartz, among others.  It was the first of three albums they made with Bobbi Humphrey, and although I’m not completely sure whether or not this was her biggest seller, it certainly put her on the map. The soaring, epic funk of tunes like Harlem River Drive sound deceptively effortless. There’s actually a lot going on there. Bobbi  does some singing on this album too in a girlish but charming voice.  The Mizells crafted their own genre in a way, pushing jazz-funk and soul-jazz into a kind of cinematic disco-jazz, as if all your favorite 2-3 minute instrumentals from Blaxploitation soundtracks were given new, deeper treatments and allowed to stretch out into full-fledged compositions.  Actually this a mediocre analogy for this record, because those constant qualities of blaxploitation film music – the tension of danger or menace – are nowhere to be found here.  There’s still a sense of something exciting going on, but it’s a lot more Summer Breeze than Superfly, I guess.  Pretty much all joyful exuberance here – this is another post I meant to do during the summer, but it’s about to be summer soon enough in the southern hemisphere so maybe I’m early rather than late.   The ensembles found on the Mizell Bros albums were always filled with heavyweights and this one does not disappoint, with stalwart Harvey Mason on the drum kit and the regal King Erisson on congas pinning down the lush soundscapes to solid earth.  Fans of the Arp synthesizer (and who isn’t a fan of the Arp?) won’t be disappointed either as it’s put to great use.  Also don’t be put off by the scrappy condition of the album cover – I lucked out and found an almost Near Mint copy of this in a “previously well-loved” jacket. Hope you enjoy it.

password: vibes


CTI All-Stars – CTI Summer Jazz at the Hollywood Bowl – Live Three (1977)

CTI ALL-STARS
CTI Summer Jazz at the Hollywood Bowl
Live Three
1977 CTI Records – CTI 7078

 

A1 Funkfathers (Stanley Turrentine) 7:46
A2 Cherry (Don Redman, Ray Gilbert) 8:00
B1 Bowl Full O’Blues (Hank Crawford) 7:46
B2 Cherry Red (Joe Turner, Pete Johnson) 4:39
B3 God Bless The Child (Arthur Herzog, Jr., Billie Holiday) 7:02

 

Bass – Ron Carter
Drums – Jack DeJohnette
Flute – Hubert Laws
Guitar – George Benson
Keyboards – Bob James, Deodato*, Johnny Hammond
Percussion – Airto
Saxophone – Grover Washington, Jr., Hank Crawford, Joe Farrell, Stanley Turrentine
Trumpet – Freddie Hubbard
Vibraphone – Milt Jackson
Vocals – Esther Phillips (tracks: B2 to B3)

Album graphic design – Sib Chalawick
Photography By – K’Abe
Producer – Creed Taylor
Recorded By – Wally Heider
Engineer – David Palmer
MC – Leonard Feather, Rick Holmes

Recorded at the Hollywood Bowl by Wally Heider on July 30th, 1972. Mixed at Electric Lady Studios in May 1977.

—————
RIPPING INFO

CTI 7078 vinyl; Pro-Ject RM-5SE with Audio Tecnica AT440-MLa cartridge; Speedbox power supply); Creek Audio OBH-15; Audioquest King Cobra cables; M-Audio Audiophile 192 Soundcard ; Adobe Audition at 32-bit float 192khz; clicks and pops removed with Click Repair on light settings, manually auditioning the output; further clicks removed with Adobe Audition 3.0; dithered and resampled using iZotope RX Advanced. Converted to FLAC in either Trader’s Little Helper or dBPoweramp. Tags done with Foobar 2000 and Tag and Rename.


Not much to say here: this is the third and final volume where CTI documented the days when people could get together for a giant open-air festival without fear of being gunned down like livestock. More vibes from Milt Jackson playing it safe. But Esther Phillips is the headliner, at least on the record, and we get wonderful tracks from her including a somewhat playful God Bless The Child which inexplicably has a few bars of Latin jazz that sound suspiciously like Wes Montgomery’s take on “TEQUILA” as a bridge to an instrumental stretch-out that stays in double time for a while before going back to the normal tempo.

It was a fun run of contractual-obligation records and but I felt more contractually obligated to finish sharing them than I felt enthusiastic about it. But that’s just moody old me.


password: vibes

CTI All-Stars – CTI Jazz at the Hollywood Bowl: Live Two (1977)

CTI All-Stars – Live Two (Summer Jazz at the Hollywood Bowl)
Vinyl rip in 24 bit 192 khz | Photos and art scans at 300 dpi
1977 CTI Records – CTI 7077

01 Blues Force 7:01 (Stanley Turrentine)
02 Rock Steady 10:30 (Aretha Franklin)
03 Theme From Love Story / Pavane / Fire And Rain 14:01 (Francis Lai, G. Faure*, James Taylor)
04 People Make The World Go Round 6:05  (Linda Creed, Thomas Bell)

Credits

Bass – Ron Carter
Drums – Jack DeJohnette
Flute – Hubert Laws
Guitar – George Benson
Keyboards – Bob James, Deodato, Johnny Hammond
Percussion – Airto
Saxophone – Grover Washington, Jr., Hank Crawford, Joe Farrell, Stanley Turrentine
Trumpet – Freddie Hubbard
Vibraphone – Milt Jackson
Vocals – Esther Phillips

Engineer – David Palmer
Design [Album] – Sib Chalawick
MC – Leonard Feather, Rick Holmes
Photography By – K’Abe
Producer – Creed Taylor
Recorded By – Wally Heider

Matrix / Runout (Runout A): 87738A1
Matrix / Runout (Runout B): 87738B11

RIPPING INFO
CTI 7076 vinyl; Pro-Ject RM-5SE with Audio Tecnica AT440-MLa cartridge; Speedbox power supply); Creek Audio OBH-15; Audioquest King Cobra cables; M-Audio Audiophile 192 Soundcard ; Adobe Audition at 32-bit float 192khz; clicks and pops removed with Click Repair on light settings, manually auditioning the output; further clicks removed with Adobe Audition 3.0; dithered and resampled using iZotope RX Advanced. Converted to FLAC in either Trader’s Little Helper or dBPoweramp. Tags done with Foobar 2000 and Tag and Rename.


The second volume of the contractual-obligation-trilogy, CTI Summer Jazz at the Hollywood Bowl, delivers the same kind of deal as the first, which you can read about in last week’s post.  I don’t have a tremendous amount to say about it.  “Blues Force” gives an opportunity for Milt Jackson to do his thing on the vibraphone.  In the last post I had said this volume would contain a version of the theme from The Thomas Crown Affair, “Windmills Of Your Mind” – well, I lied.  I got my Michel Legrand confused with my Francis Lai.  They both have similar, wistful melodies, so that’s my excuse.  Opening up the second side of the LP, it becomes a medley with some Renaissance jazz in “Pavane” and winds up with an almost-stirring “Fire and Rain.”  Freddie Hubbard again leads the group on the album’s closer with “People Make The World Go Round.”  Not to discourage anyone’s enthusiasm but I reiterate what I said in the first post – these live records are pleasant enough but I would mostly rather here a studio release from any of the many titans on this stage, they are just more compelling.  The third volume should be up this weekend, which features two  tracks (not one, as misspoken last week) featuring the great Esther Phillips on vocals, who gets credited on the first two LPs because it cost too much to customize the album credits on these.

Anybody who reads this blog and has some money to spare – please donate it to the relief efforts in Puerto Rico, that colonial property of the US who a certain asinine toddler just mocked instead of mobilizing support for humanitarian aid.  I’m not in the habit of endorsing specific charitable organizations, most have their pros and cons and it’s your choice.  Stay sane out there!


password: vibes