Jorge Ben – Negro é Lindo (1971) {Salve, Jorge! Boxset}


01 – Rita Jeep
02 – Porque é Proibido Pisar Na Grama
03 – Cassius Marcelo Clay
04 – Cigana
05 – Zula
06 – Negro é Lindo
07 – Comanche
08 – Que Maravilha
09 – Maria Domingas
10 – Palomaris

Original release:
Produced by Paulinho Tapajós
Recording technicians: Toninho and Mazzola
Studio: C.B.D.P.
Arrangements by Arthur Verocai
Photo: Wilney Cover design: Aldo Luiz

2009 reissue credits
Supervision: Alice Soares
Project conceptualization: Carlos Savalla
Liner Notes: Ana Maria Bahiana
Coordination: Rodrigo Faour
Remastering: Luigi Hoffer at DMS Mastering Solutions
Restoration of original LP covers and adaptation for CD: Leandro Arraes at LAStudio
Editing: Luiz Augusto
Graphic design: Geysa Adnet

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Interestingly, the bilingual texts on the new CD jackets do not actually have the same information, both containing some tidbits of info that the other doesn’t have. In the interest of globalization I am going to do a quick free translation here (all errors are my own..):


Jorge Ben Jor’s trilogy of albums with Trio Mocotó closes with the powerful “Negro É Lindo” (Black is Beuatiful) in 1971, in a phase of the Brazilian culture industry where blacks began to be perceived as potential consumers. Negro é Lindo delivers an homage to Cassius Clay (later known as Muhammad Ali) and also to João Parahyba, nicknamed Comanche. It has delcarations of love for his beloved wife Maria Tereza Domingas and, at the same time, proposes a pact of goodwill and unity to Rita Lee, responsible for his trips to and from the studio to his house in Brooklin (*southside neighborhood of São Paulo, not the one in New York…).

One difference in relation to the other LPs is the fact that this one was to be more centered on the acoustic guitar in its arrangements, possibly the fruit of his partnership with Paulinho Tapajós, who directed Ben’s recordings between 71 and 75. In the studio, Tapajós prefered to record Jorge one his own and on stop of a platform, under which were placed microphones that captured the time-keeping beats of the artists’ shoes and foot-tapping, and the scrape of his pick across the guitar strings. Beginning with this base, the arrangements were built around him. “With the pulse of the foot-taps, his, voice, and the guitar pick, Jorge transformed himself into a machine of rhythm. Afterward, I embellished this with the other instruments in arrangements (of scale and tone) that wouldn’t conflict with what he was doing. We recorded 30, 40 songs for one single album and I believe there must be a lot of unreleased material. It was the best way to work, because the coolest thing about Jorge is the freedom. He does not have discipline. Therefore, we had to follow along after him.” One could analyze this liberty and freedom as a certain kind of alienation between the techniques and artifices of the studio and the process of practicing as a group. There are classic moments calling for the bridge, or the end of a sing, same as LPs recorded live (“Em cima!”, “Miudinho!”). Add to this the fact that Ben, aside from composing the lyrics and music for the vast majority of the songs he created, did not do arrangements for other instruments: in this era, he played his guitar and sang, and the arranger (or Trio Mocotó) did their work on top of this.

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Side note from Flabbergast… Interesting that Arthur Verocai, who at this point in time is probably more famous outside Brazil than within it, does not get any mention in these liner notes even though he was responsible for the arrangements as much or more so than producer Tapajós…

The notes also sidestep Ben’s involvement with and importance to the movement(s) variously referred to as Black Rio, Black Power, Samba Soul, Movimento Negro, in the 1970s. An embracing of black identity in an allegedly colorblind ‘racial democracy’ where bring up something like “Black Pride” is likely to spark an argument. In fact doing so led to just such an argument for me TODAY — one has to remember this was even more polemical in the early 70s. It’s not the first foray into this territory in Ben’s music or lyrics, by any means, but probably the first where he is self-consciously integrating his work around Afrocentric ideas, making him part of a global phenomenon happening at the same time in the US, the Caribbean, in other parts of Latin America, and in Africa itself. The liner notes would almost imply that this was a marketing strategy (the black woman or man as potential consumer), an interpretation which I hope is just me being reactionary and radical and indignant as I sometimes tend to be… Because if that IS the implication, then its an insult to Jorge Ben and the massive accomplishments of his music during this period.

This pressing hails from the 12-CD boxset released just a week ago. There will be more of it to come…

With complete artwork, m3u playlist, and proper ID-tags

Jorge Ben – Negro é Lindo (1971) in 320 kbs em pee three

Jorge Ben – Negro é Lindo (1971) in FLAC LOSSLESS AUDIO

Luiz Eça y La Familia Sagrada – Onda Nova do Brasil (1970)

Luiz Eça y La Familia Sagrada
Recorded 1970*
Released on Discos AVV SA (Mexico) – AVV-1136, 1978

My friend in Italy is setting me up with a bunch of music on one of my favorite labels, VampiSoul. This one is the first of the bunch I will share with you, and it is really an amazing delight for the ears. One of the biggest aural surprises I have had in a long time was putting this album on and thinking, how the HELL did this go unreleased for 8 years — and to all appearances has never seen an official release in Brazil itself.

Luiz Eça, the innovative pianist behind the Tamba Trio (and later the Tamba 4), explores more pop territory on this album, with only one of his own compositions making an appearance. Classic tunes from Milton Nascimento and Fernando Brandt, an original interpretation of the oft-covered ‘Pais Tropical’ from Jorge Ben features Wilson Simonal belting it out, several songs from my favorite freak Antônio Adolfo, and even a Roberto Carlos tune. The song ‘Yemele’ (by Luis Carlos Vinhas and Chico Feitoso, mispelled on the CD jacket), had been recorded in a very funky version by Maria Bethania a year or two earlier and may have been an inspiration for this reading.

Sr. Eça has help from a HUGE ensemble of amazing musicians. Check this out:

Wow you can possibly go wrong with this? Also it seems that Nelson Angelo, Joyce, and Nana Vasconcelos had a habit of working on albums that never got released in their day.

If you enjoy this album even a fraction as much as I do, I think it will improve your day considerably.

* According to VampiSoul this was recorded in Brazil, but I question this. Most if not all of the musicians participating on this album were hiding out in Mexico after the military counter-revolution issued constitutional act AI-5 and things got *really* bad. In fact the person responsible for the eventual release of the album, Rogelio Villareal, ran a hotel chain at which tons of bossa nova and MPB starts took refuge and performed regularly. As it seems rather unlikely to me that a huge group of musicians like this would go back to the dictatorship to record this album, all signs point to it being recorded in Mexico itself.

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Luiz Eça y La Familia Sagrada – Onda Nova do Brasil (1970) in 320 em pee three

Luiz Eça y La Familia Sagrada – Onda Nova do Brasil (1970) in FLAC LOSSLESS AUDIO

Jorge Ben – Força Bruta (1970) 320kbs ABR

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JORGE BEN
Força Bruta
Original release 1970
Dusty Groove America reissue 2007

This is a fantastic record. I was wrong with crediting the 1969 to Trio Mocotó yesterday — I believe the partnership actually began with this record. Formerly very difficult to track down, Dusty Groove has done us all a public service by making it available again!! BUY A COPY today

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Jorge Ben “Forca Bruta” (Philips, 1970)
A dreamy, relaxed album made with the Trio Mocoto (see below for more info about them…) A couple of the songs on here are regularly included on anthologies (“O Telefone Tocou Novamente,” “Charles, Jr.”) but most of this album is material that tragically has been on the backshelf for decades… I suppose this is the sort of album that you have to settle into — it’s very pretty and very laid back, cloaking a funky undercurrent in an acoustic samba wash, and intensely seductive. Why this album remains out of print is a real mystery

review from DGA
A fantastically soulful album from Jorge Ben — one of his greatest records ever, and a key part of Brazilian music in the 70s! The album marks an earthier shift for Jorge — a sound that’s still rooted in the samba influences of the 60s, but which also takes on a bit more soul at the bottom — thanks to rhythmic contributions from Trio Mocoto, who work here famously to help Ben shape the overall feel of the set! There’s still a bit of larger orchestrations at moments, but these are used sparingly just to sweeten the sound — leaving the main force of the music to come from Jorge’s guitar, and the cuica, percussion, and tamborim of the trio. The vocals are wonderful too — slightly raspy, and with a bit more feeling than we ever remember Jorge having on record — sometimes a bit intimate, yet always with an undeniable presence throughout. One of those records that still sends chills up our spines, year after year — with tracks that include “Oba La Vem Ela”, “Ze Canjica”, “Pulo Pulo”, “Apareceu Aparecida”, “Terezinha”, “Mulher Brasileira”, “Forca Bruta”, “O Telefone Tocou Novamente”, and “Charles Junior”.

Jorge Ben – Jorge Ben (1969) 320 kbs ABR

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Jorge Ben
‘JORGE BEN’
1969 Philips

1. Criola
2. Domingas
3. Cade Tereza
4. Barbarella
5. Pais Tropical
6. Take It Easy My Brother Charles
7. Descobri Que Eu Sou Um Anjo
8. Bebete Vaobora
9. Quem Foi Que Roubou A Sopeira De Porcelana Chinesa Que A Vovo Ganhou Da Baronesa?
10. Que Pena
11. Charles, Anjo 45

This is an essential album from Jorge Ben and (until just this year!) has been rather scarce to track down. NOTE ** This rip comes from the original Philips CD pressing and not from the one on Dusty Groove’s label. ** I will probably get the latter in the near future and I could post it here, but I recommend everyone give their money to Dusty Groove America anyway because they are the GREATEST RECORD STORE OF ALL TIME and deserve it. They’ve been very picky about what music they reissue, exercising their world-famous exquisite taste — but I’d love to see them reissue more goodies so give them your $$ and help ’em out!

All of Jorge Ben’s material up through the late 70s is golden, but this period of 1969-1976 was especially fruitful. This album marks a new chapter in his discography, considerably broadening out his sound pallete. His records of the mid-70s (A Tábua de Esmeralda especially) would get slightly more experimental than this one, but this album contains the track “Descobri que eu sou um anjo” (I discovered that I am an angel), which surely ranks as Ben’s strangest composition yet still manages to groove. Incidentally, I saw Caetano Veloso perform this track as an encore during his last tour — it was the highlight of the show for me, since his new record was rather lackluster and he was being backed the Brazilian equivalent of U2 in 1990 (this is not a compliment, FYI). But to come back on stage and play this “deep cut” for an American audience 95% of which wouldn’t recognize it — well, I forgave Caetano for the misguided ‘rocker’ persona he’s been flauting lately. This Jorge Ben record ought to be as famous and ubiquitous as Caetano’s 1969 “white album”, or other gems from 69 like Abbey Road. It’s a milestone and always a pleasure.

(from Dusty Groove dot com)

A samba soul masterpiece from Jorge Ben — one of the most brilliant records to come out the fertile late 60s Brazilian scene — and an incredible album that works with the psychedelic flourishes of Ben’s contemporaries and a deeper undercurrent of soul & funk! This is one of the most amazing early Jorge Ben LPs, recorded at the end of the 60s, when Jorge was singing with a stone-cold soul sound. The sharp, tight arrangements by Rogerio Duprat & Jose Briamonte made tracks like “Pais Tropical”, “Take It Easy My Brother Charles”, and “Que Pena” immediate classics — while the percussion and rhythms of Trio Mocoto provide a good part of the unique backdrop. The album is a mix of funky samba, soaring Brazilian soul, and sweeping orchestrations that give the whole thing a jazzy finish — and it’s some of the best work that Jorge Ben ever recorded! Other tracks include “Criola”, Cade Tereza”, “Domingas”, “Barbarella”, “Quem Foi Que Roubou A Sopeira” and more.

(From Wikiepedia)

“In 1969, Jorge Ben released his self-titled album amid the excitement of the cultural and musical Tropicália movement. The album featured Trio Mocotó as his backing band, who would go on to launch a successful career on the back of their association with Ben. The album was noted for “País Tropical,” one of his most famous compositions, although it would be Wilson Simonal who would take his recording of the song to the top of the charts in Brazil that same year. Instead, the song “Charles, Anjo 45″, also from the self-titled album, would become Ben’s biggest self-performed chart hit of the year.”

(From Slipcue dot com… Incidentally I think he’s wrong in his interpretation of the manacles but that’s neither here nor there…)

Jorge Ben “Jorge Ben” (Philips, 1969)
An excellent album, with some of his catchiest songs, many of which often make it onto best-of compilations. Wildly inventive, syncretic, experimental pop music, ranging from San Francisco-sound psychedelia to spaghetti western schmaltz, and deep, heavy samba-soul. The album is both soulful and playful, as when he sings the last half of one song in a funny voice, with his nose pinched shut, or when the string section veers into bent-note atonality. The album art shows Ben with the emblem of the Flamengo futbol team on his guitar, and broken manacles on his wrists — the latter presumably a powerful statement about the military dictatorship which was running the country at the time, and actively trying to repress the tropicalia movement. One of his best records… definitely worth tracking down!

Jorge Ben – Africa Brasil (1976) [320]

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

Some great funk here and a classic still going strong! I´ve enjoyed this album so many times and I was thinking there might be some not listened to it yet. Now´s your chance!

Review by Phil Jandovsky, All Music Guide
This 1976 album is undoubtedly one of the greatest classics of Brazilian popular music, with Jorge Ben mixing funky samba, Afro-Brazilian beats, and crunching guitars to create one of the most fascinating sounds ever recorded in Brazil. The album kicks off with the raw, energetic “Ponta de Lança Africano,” and from there on it never slows down, but continues to pile up one fiery, funky gem after the other. The samba soul and samba funk scenes of the ’70s in Brazil produced many great artists and many great recordings, fully comparable with the best soul and funk music recorded in the U.S. during the same period. Jorge Ben was the most prominent figure of this scene and África Brasil is probably the most famous of his ’70s recordings. For any person who is interested in the music of Jorge Ben, or indeed Brazilian funk in general, there is no better sample of it than África Brasil.

1 Ponta de Lanca Africano (Umbabarauma)
2 Hermes Trimegisto Escreveu
3 O Filosofo
4 Meus Filhos, Meu Tesouro
5 O Plebeu
6 Taj Mahal
7 Xica da Silva
8 Historia de Jorge
9 Camisa 10 da Gavea
10 Cavaleiro Do Cavalo Imaculado
11 África Brasil (Zumbi)

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