Leci Brandão – Antes Que Eu Volte A Ser Nada (1975) (1980 Japan Polydor / Marcus Pereira WLP)

Leci Brandão – Antes Que Eu Volte A Ser Nada
Vinyl rip in 24-bit/192 kHz | FLAC |  300 dpi scans |Samba, MPB, Brazil
1975 Marcus Pereira || 1980 Polydor Japan

 

A classic debut album from one of the best artists to emerge from the 1970’s roots samba revival in Brazil, Leci Brandão is unique in that not only was she a tremendous singer but she also composed — on this album, there’s not a song she didn’t write!  Continue reading

Airto – Seeds On The Ground / The Natural Sounds of Airto (1971) (2020 Real Gone Music) Day 4 of FV’s 12 Days of Xmas

Airto – Seeds On The Ground / The Natural Sounds of Airto
Vinyl rip in 24-bit/192 kHz | FLAC |  300 dpi scans | Jazz, Brazilian, Fusion
Original release, 1971 Buddah Recordhs / Reissue 2020 Real Gone Music / Sony Records

Day 4 of Flabbergasted Vibes’ 12 Days of Christmas finally brings us to Brazil.  Sort of.   I predict there will be much more Brazilian content on this blog in 2022.

The first couple albums from Airto Moreira could easily be co-credited to Hermeto Pascoal, since he played such a major role in them.  He wrote all but two of the tracks on this one. I once had a transcendental shamanic experience with this album while laying in a hammock in the middle of mountain forest.  But you don’t need such accoutrements  to be transported by the music here, it’s truly  the stuff of magic.  At turns moody, deep, and profoundly uplifting, sometimes all at once.  A young Flora Purim shines here too, and she channels Gal Costa’s tropicalista phase with aplomb on tunes like O Sonho / Moon Dreams, a tune credited to Livingston & Evans of “Que Sera Sera” fame and which is also on Flora’s “Butterfly Dreams” LP on Milestone from a few years after this.   It is also worth noting that Sivuca puts in an appearance on the accordion, and Dom Um Romão on the drums, as well as (honorary Brazilian?) Ron Carter on bass throughout.

A1 – Andei (I Walked)
A2 – O Sonho (Moon Dreams)
A3 – Uri (Wind)
A4 – Papo Furado (Jive Talking)
B1 – Juntos (We Love)
B2 – O Galho Da Roseira (The Branches Of The Rose Tree)
B3 – O Galho Da Roseira (The Branches Of The Rose Tree) Part II

A1    Andei (I Walked)
Bass – Ron Carter
Vocals, Percussion, Berimbau – Airto
Written By, Harpsichord, Flute – Hermeto Pascoal


A2    O Sonho (Moon Dreams)
Bass – Ron Carter
Drums, Percussion – Airto
Keyboards – Hermeto Pascoal
Vocals – Flora Purim
Written By – J. Livingston & R. Evans


A3    Uri (Wind)
Accordion – Sivuca
Acoustic Guitar, Voice, Written-By, Flute [Bass Flute] – Hermeto Pascoal
Bass, Cello – Ron Carter
Viola – Severino De Oliveira
Vocals, Drums, Percussion, Voice – Airto
Voice, Vocals – Flora Purim
Voice, Written By – Googie


A4    Papo Furado (Jive Talking)
Acoustic Guitar, Voice – Severino De Oliveira
Bass, Voice – Ron Carter
Percussion, Voice – Dom Um Romão
Vocals, Percussion, Voice – Airto*
Written By, Acoustic Guitar, Voice – Hermeto Pascoal


B1    Juntos (We Love)
Bass – Ron Carter
Drums, Percussion – Airto
Organ – Severino De Oliveira
Percussion – Dom Um Romão
Written By, Flute [Bass Flute], Piano – Hermeto Pascoal
Written By, Vocals – Flora Purim


B2    O Galho Da Roseira (The Branches Of The Rose Tree)
Acoustic Guitar, Accordion – Severino De Oliveira
Bass – Ron Carter
Keyboards, Written By – Hermeto Pascoal
Percussion – Dom Um Romão
Vocals – Flora Purim


B3    O Galho Da Roseira (The Branches Of The Rose Tree) Part II
Acoustic Guitar, Accordion – Severino De Oliveira
Bass – Ron Carter
Percussion – Dom Um Romão
Vocals – Flora Purim
Written By, Keyboards – Hermeto Pascoal
Credits

Art Direction, Photography By – Sid Maurer
Co-producer, Engineer – Tony May
Coordinator – Flora Purim
Creative Director [Director Of Creative Packaging & Merchandising] – Milton Sincoff
Design – Michael Mandel
Photography By [Back & Inside Covers] – Hal Wilson
Producer – Airto Moreira

Notes
Limited to 1000 copies

LINEAGE: 2020 Real Gone Music / Sony vinyl; Pro-Ject RM-5SE with Audio Tecnica Signet TK7E cartridge; Speedbox power supply; Creek Audio OBH-15; Audioquest Black Mamba and Pangea Premier interconnect cables; M-Audio Audiophile 192 Soundcard ; Adobe Audition at 32-bit float 192khz;  clicks and pops removed manually with Adobe Audition 3.0; resampled and dithered using iZotope RX Advanced. Converted to FLAC in either Trader’s Little Helper or dBPoweramp. Tags done with Foobar 2000 and Tag and Rename.

All resolutions of FLAC: 16/44.1, 24/96, 24/192

password: vibes

Hermeto Pascoal e Grupo – Lagoa da Canoa Municipio de Arapiraca (1984)

Hermeto Pascoal E Grupo
Lagoa Da Canoa Município De Arapiraca
Original release 1984, Som da Gente
This issue, 1988  Happy Hour Music HH5005-2

Normally, during this time of year, I like to post some forró pé de serra and baião to commemorate the marvelous Festas Juninas I came to appreciate when I lived in the northeast of Brazil.  It’s not as if I’ve run out of vintage forró records to post about on the blog, but I feel I could use a change of pace.  I’ve been experiencing some pretty wicked job burnout and other related issues that have put me in an odd state of mind and, with unfortunate frequency, a rather foul mood.  Hence, Hermeto Pascoal is kind of just what the proverbial doctor ordered: something to alleviate the foul mood by way of resonating with odd and the uncomfortable.  Hermeto’s music can be disorienting in the most humanistic of ways. Continue reading

Gal Costa – Gal (1969) (Mono mix)


Gal Costa – Gal
1969 Philips R 765.098 L

The great Gal Costa released two classic Tropicália records in 1969, and this one is widely known as the mind-bendingly psychedelic monster of the two.  The version presented here is the original mono mix and not the stereo mix that appeared on the Gal Total boxset and later in a Polysom reissue.  Gal has always surrounded herself with musical heavyweights but she was keeping particularly heady company at this time: this record has substantial involvement from Gil, Caetano and Jards Macalé (who would serve as her musical director not long after this).  No less than two compositions from Jorge Ben are featured here, including the rather deep cut “Tuareg” in a particularly funky arrangement. Continue reading

Tim Maia – Disco Club (1978) (2018 Mr. Bongo reissue)

Tim Maia – Disco Club
2018 Mr. Bongo MRBLP156/ Original release 1978 Atlantic (Brazil)

I am making this blog post on May 31 so that it cannot be said that the first six months of 2020 did not have any Brazilian content whatsoever from Flabbergasted Vibes.  I guess I have been kind of ‘down’ on Brazil lately – fascism has run / been running amok there and the Covid situation is just heartbreaking.  Something’s got to change.  But today is a holiday in the U.S. and the unofficial start of summer, so in case your BBQ needs a soundtrack, here’s a fun Tim Maia album.  If you are totally new to Tim Maia, I personally wouldn’t pick Disco Club as an introduction. Not because I have a problem with the disco sound of a few tunes (and there are lots of soul tunes and a couple of funk slammers too, in case you have an irrational aversion to disco). Actually the first two tunes are an unapologetic-ally commercial take on disco without any of the underground currents or ripples which make that genre interesting, though ‘Ascendo O Farol’ scored a big hit for Tim.  But putting that aside, mostly I just don’t get as excited about this album as I do about most of his other records made both before and after this one. Lots of people love the record though, so YMMV. Contributions from Hyldon and Cassiano (who died this year from Covid-19)  help keep things lively.   Worth having just for ‘Sossego’ alone, but there are lots of great songs here. Continue reading

João Bosco – João Bosco (1973)


João Bosco – João Bosco
Original release 1973
2003 reissue
RCA / BMG France 74321 965032

 

In 1972, João Bosco only had a split 7-inch single under his name as a recording artist, but the fact that the other side of that 7″ was from Tom Jobim should tell you the high regard he was held in even at this stage. That same year, Elis Regina would record her first Bosco/Blanc-authored song, Bala Por Pala, and songs from the prolific writing duo would feature prominently on her records for the rest of the decade.  That song also appears here, on João Bosco’s debut album, in a version that is more exciting and, well, smoothly frenetic in a way that is distinctly Bosco’s. Continue reading