Airto – Fingers (1973) (CTI Records 6028)

Airto – Fingers
Vinyl rip in 24-bit/192 kHz | FLAC |  Art scans at 300 dpi
1.4GB (24/192) | 865 MB (24/96)
CTI Records 6028| Genre: Fusion, Latin Jazz, Jazz Rock

This post was intended to go up over the weekend as a commemoration to wrap up the Festas Juninas.  “Fingers” is really is a masterpiece from Airto Moreira, one of the progenitors of jazz fusion, with lots of help from future members of the Uruguayan group Opa and, of course, his wife Flora Purim. It is less “out” than his solo records up to this point but still retains enough traces of his wild urges toward surprise and experimentation to keep things interesting. The compositions, about half of which are contributed by Opa members, are accessible enough to instantly grab your attention but are always offering new nuances on repeated listens. How many edgy Latin-Jazz-Fusion albums actually contain EARWORMS in their grooves? This album has tunes you will be whistling to yourself for weeks afterward, in particular the track “Parana.” (more below) Continue reading

Som Três – Som Três Show (1968) (BOM24183)

Som Tres – Som Tres Show (1968)
Original: 1968 Odeon MOFB 3541
Reissue: 2010 Bomba Records, Japan – BOM24183
Originally Odeon MOFB 3541

1. Leonardo
2. Falsa Baiana
3. Amazonas (Keep Talking)
4. The World Goes On
5. The Look Of Love
6. Frevo Rasgado
7. Jungle
8. Sá Marina
9. Watch What Happens
10. Emília
11. Balanço Zona Sul Continue reading

Dora Lopes – Enciclopédia da Gíria (1957 Mocambo)

Dora Lopes – Enciclopédia da Gíria
Mocambo / Rozenblit 1957

Is this a Pride Month post?  Sort of, because Dora Lopes was possibly the first “out” singer in Brazilian popular music.   But this record was  before anyone outside Rio scenesters knew or cared about her sexuality, and even before she was the proprietor of O Caixotinho, one of Rio’s first lesbian nightclubs that served the Copacabana area beginning in the second half of the 60s.  This 1957 album is notable for other reasons, like being released on the small Recife imprint Mocambo, and for the fact that Dora gets composer credits on all but a couple songs here in a era when women songwriters were not the norm.  The songs and arrangements fit more in the jazz-samba world than the nascent bossa nova scene. Continue reading

Roberto Carlos – O Inimitável (1968)

ROBERTO CARLOS –  O  INIMITÁVEL
1968 CBS Records (Brasil)
This CD pressing 199_? Columbia 850.105/2-464065

12 Days of Christmas – Day 12 – For Three Kings Day, you get one king. O Rei, the incomparable, inimitable Roberto Carlos.  This is a thoroughly excellent record with the exception of one song that annoys the crap out of me.  See if you know Dr. Vibes’ tastes well enough to figure out which one it is, and win a free year’s subscription to Flabbergasted Vibes!  I’m exhausted, too exhausted to give this album a worthy write-up, but maybe I will share the MONO version of it sometime soon and unloosen my tongue with aplomb.   Meanwhile this early CD pressing of the stereo mix sounds pretty good, at least it isn’t crushed / brick-walled like the version include with the “Pra Sempre” boxset.    I hope you have all enjoyed this 12 Days of Christmas, perhaps inaugurating a new tradition as the blog continues into its second decade (!!).  I’m going to be extremely busy in the next few months, so I don’t know how often you’ll hear from me, but may you all be free of trouble in this New Year!

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João Donato & Deodato – DonatoDeodato (1973)

João Donato & Deodato – DonatoDeodato
1973 Muse Records MR 5017

Vinyl rip in 24 bit 192 khz | Art at  300 dpi
24-bit 192 khz – 1.22 GB | 24 bit 96 khz – 645 MB | 220 MB 16-bit 44.1 khz
Jazz-Funk – Latin – Brazilian

 

Dr. Vibes’ 12 Days of Christmas – Day 5:  Quite a lineup on this short gem of a record. I mean, if I could have added Chuck Rainey, Idris Muhammad, and Phil Upchurch to it, it would have been PERFECT but heck, I’ll take this…  This is a nice, short, mildly psychedelic jazz-funk gem, if not quite the explosive results you might expect for a meeting of the minds like Donato & Deodato.  Ray Barretto and Airto are kept on kind of a short leash, for example.  Considering the total album time clocks in at around 30 minutes, one wonders why they couldn’t have stretched out a little more on a few of these tunes.  The band surely could have handled it.

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