Colombia! The Golden Age Of Discos Fuentes. The Powerhouse Of Colombian Music 1960-76

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Colombia! The Golden Age Of Discos Fuentes. The Powerhouse Of Colombian Music 1960-76
Various Artists
Soundway Records (SNDWCD008)
Every Soundway compilation is a labor of love and this one is no exception. This collection focuses on the Fuentes label of Colombia, which has been active there since the 1930s. Covering a mighty chunk of stylistic territory and a span of over fifteen years is no mean feat and it’s remarkable the collection holds together as well as it does. It has its flaws but they are relatively minor and far outweighed by the fact that Soundway is making this music available to a wider audience that to a large extent have not had much access to it. Continue reading

Eddie Palmieri – The Sun of Latin Music (1973) 320kbs

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EDDIE PALMIERI – The Sun of Latin Music (1973) 320kbs
with Lalo Rodriguez

1 Nada de Ti Palmieri 6:31
2 Deseo Salvaje Rodriguez 3:41
3 Una Rosa Española Palmieri 5:21

4 Nunca Contigo Palmieri 3:51

5 Un Dia Bonito Palmieri 14:52

6 Mi Cumbia Palmieri 3:18
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Credits: Arranged By – Rene Hernandez
Bass – Eddie “Gua-Gua” Rivera*
Bongos – Tommy Lopez
Congas – Eladio Perez
Coro – Jimmy Sabater , Willie Torres
Engineer – Dave Palmer (2) , Dave Wittman , Ralph Moss
French Horn – Peter Gordon
Lead Vocals – Lalo Rodriguez
Mastered By – Al Brown (5)
Piano – Eddie Palmieri
Producer – Harvey Averne
Saxophone [Baritone], Flute – Mario Rivera (2) , Ronnie Cuber
Timbales, Percussion – Nicky Marrero
Trombone – Jose Rodriguez (3)
Trombone, Tuba [Tenor] – Barry Rogers
Trumpet – Virgil Jones
Trumpet [Lead] – Vitin Paz
Tuba – Tony Price (2)
Violin – Alfredo De La Fe

This is original album, The Sun Of Latin Music, *not* the double-CD anthology released by the revamped Fania Records. Please don’t leave a comment if all you are going to do is ask for that anthology… The sound quality on this edition (on the label `Musical Productions`) is deplorable, and there are apparently are other CD pressings out there, on Charly and Sony records. But this is the one I have, so love it or leave it.

Now that I have given you the hard sell, let me tell you that this is an essential album. It won Palmieri the first of many Grammy awards, but that’s not why it’s essential. For a guy who was always pushing boundaries during this period, this record still stands out. One thing that will immediately grab your attention is the presence of a violin on the album – not an instrument sometimes heard on salsa records but which always sounds unique to me. Alfredo de la Fe will make you forget that’s the case, as he blends seamlessly with the ensemble while adding a unique tonal edge. All of the songs are winners here, but the stand-out centerpiece is the fifteen-minute Un Dia Bonito, which took up most of the second side of the original LP. It is everything that was great about Barretto during this period — beginning with moody, ‘out’ jazz explorations, laced with psychedelic fringes (this was recorded at Electric Lady, after all), it culminates in a smoking descarga jam that, well, leaves you rather short of air. The Sun of Latin music, indeed.

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Alegre All-Stars – Best of The Alegre All-Stars (2005)

 

Alegre All-Stars – The Best of..(2005) 320kbs
Released pm Vampi-Soul, 2005

This set of music really cooks. VampiSoul is a cool label that puts out great music, but isn’t exactly known for thorough packaging or notes. The blurb below the tracklist here is literally all we get. The lineup listed on the inside of the digipack is filled with heavy hitters, but probably not playing all the same time! But, the music is fantastic and that’s what counts!!!

1. Ay Camino y Ven
2. Rareza del Siglo
3. Soy Feliz
4. Almendra
5. Peanut Vendor
6. Consulelate
7. El Sopon
8. Sono Sono
9. Guajira en “F”
10. Clo Clo Ki-Ki-Ri-Ki
11. Manteca
12. Los Dandies
13. Ensayo Pa’La Luna
14. Se Acabo lo Que Se Daba

“Product Description”
The first Alegre All Stars was recorded in 1961, and it became an immediate favorite of latin oriented musicians and the so-called “super-hip”. The public did not take to it so rapidly, and it became a “sleeper”. In retrospect we must remember it was released at the time when the latin record business was geared mostly for the “le lo lai” market (a typical Puerto Rico festival). Guitar music of trios and quartets were the thing then. The latin dance music of New York was limited to the connoisseur (i.e., D.J’s, musicologists merchant marines and the Palladium crowd). Eventually it had its impact: it was loose, relaxed and it ventilated many brain cells. It blended latin and jazz, improvised yet melodically interesting because the soloists were not guessing, they were confident, they knew their horns, skins and tonsils and were playing and singing for themselves at a party. Not a recording session, a real party. Without charts, less restrictions and less organized, it was therefore freer to swing and be creative. Over the years the Alegre All Star albums have become “classics”, and this album is a compilation of their best.

 

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