Baden Powell – Swings with Jimmy Pratt (1963)

 

“Baden Powell Swings with Jimmy Pratt”
Elenco ME-4, 1963

Musicians: Baden Powell (git)
Jorge “Jorginho” Ferreira da Silva, Copinha (fl)
Moacir Santos (sax, vcl)
Sandoval (cl)
Sergio Barroso (b)
Jimmy Pratt (dr)
Rubem Bassini (perc)
unknown piano playerProduction: Aloysio de Oliveira
Direction: Jimmy Pratt
Production Manager: Peter Keller
Studio: Philips of Brasil
Sound Engineer: Norman Sternberg
Recording Technician: Celio Martins
Cover Layout: Cesar G. Villela
Photos: Francisco PereiraGuitar Model: Author 3 by luthier Reinaldo DiGiorgioAlso issued as: Developments (LP, 1970)
O Mestre do Violao Brasileiro (CD-Box, 2003)

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Flabbergasted Vinyl Transfer Specs:

Original Elenco (ME-4) pressing -> Pro-Ject RM-5SE turntable / Sumiko Blue Point 2 cartridge / Pro-Ject Speedbox power supply -> Creek OBH-18 MM Phono Preamp -> M-Audio Audiophile 2496 soundcard. Recorded at 24-bit / 96 khz resolution to Audacity. Click Repair on very light settings to remove some clicks and popsm, some manual click removal using Audition. Track splitting in Adobe Audition 3.0. Dithered to 16-bit using iZotope M-Bit noise-shaping. Converted to FLAC and mp3 using DbPoweramp. ID tags done with Foobar2000.

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I don’t know anything about Jimmy Pratt other than he plays the skins on a whole bunch of jazz records from the 40s and 50s, having done sessions with Charlie Parker, Stan Getz, Zoot Sims, Oscar Pettiford, Bud Shank, and Anita O’Day. Busy guy. But this record may be one of the most famous he played on. Partly because he essentially receives co-billing on the marquee with Baden. But also he was, in a way, in the right place at the right time to really connect with the Bossa Nova explosion.

From the back cover:

“When the drummer Jimmy Pratt was in Brazil accompanying Caterina Valente, he heard Baden play guitar like everyone that was exposed to Baden’s art, he was profoundly enthusiastic. The enthusiasm provoked the idea for this recording. And from the recording was also born a friendship and mutual admiration between the two artists. ‘Baden Powell Swings with Jimmy Pratt’ is a tribute from Baden to his friend and American colleague.” – Aloysio de Oliveira

The observent among might notice Mr. Pratt apparently did not make the photo session for the album or else closely guards his image against potential feitiço and witchcraft.. He is absent from the shots taken in the recording studio, unless we are looking at the back of his head in the shot where Vinicius de Moraes appears for no particular reason — it’s an instrumental record bereft of his lovely lyrics, he didn’t play anything, and he only has a writing credit on the very first tune, ‘Deve Ser Amor.’ Anyway, I find it amusing.

In the photo to the right of this we see Baden playing into a Neumann U-87 microphone, and looking like he wants to walk into the control room and slap somebody. I’m not sure why because it’s a great-sounding recording.

Fantastic playing from everyone involved, including Moacir Santos who contributes his own compositions, Coisas No.1 and Coisas No.2. It`s the clarinet, however, that really slays me on this record: while doing the vinyl transfer and processing, I swear I listened to Coisas No.1 about ten times in a row at one point. When you hear it you will know why. There is nothing groovier on earth.

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Baden Powell – Canta Vinicius de Moraes e Paulo Cesar Pinheiro (1977)

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Baden Powell – Canta Vinicus De Moraes e Paolo Cesar Pinheiro

01. Labareda [0:04:48.77]
02. Linda Baiana [0:02:49.18]
03. Cavalo Marinho [0:04:00.20]
04. Samba De Bencao [0:09:02.65]
05. E de lei [0:04:21.06]
06. Cancioneiro [0:03:43.76]
07. Figa de guine [0:03:40.61]
08. Falei e Disse [0:03:10.36]
09. Bezouro manganga [0:03:01.98]

AMG Rating: 4 Stars
Release Date: Feb 21, 2006
Recording Date: Apr 1977
Label: Universal

Andre Arpino – Drums
Raymond Guiot – Flute
Raymond Katarzynski – Trombone
Sam Kelly – Percussion
Nilton Marcelino – Percussion
Baden Powell – Guitar, Vocals
Luigi Trussardi – Bass
Vilson Vasconcelos – Percussion


Review by Thom Jurek
Only 38-minutes long, Canta Vinicius De Moraes e Paolo Cesar Pinheiro is one of the truly great Baden Powell recordings. Long before alcoholism took its toll on the great guitarist and composer, he recorded this set in 1977 for the Festival label at the behest (read: strongarm tactics) of Jacques Lubin, his A&R man at Barclay, as a tribute to the two great lyricists and collaborations in his life. This CD issue was released by the jazz label Sunnyside, and licensed from Universal International. Powell is supported on this program buy a small group of truly sympathetic studio musicians who held him in awe. His small, tender, but deeply moving voice on such classics as “Labaréda,” and “Samba de Bênção” — both of which are based on the chants, rhythms, and melodies of the Afro-Brazilian Candoble religion — that holds the magic. On the gorgeous and dreamy “Cavalo Marinho,” in which Raymond Guiot’s flute gently invokes the lyric of “Fly Me to the Moon,” from Powell’s melody in the intro, Powell’s voice gently swoons, as if singing to a lover in the wee hours of morning. There is a sadness in it too; one that holds its place even in the most expressively romantic passages. All of these were written with Vinicius De Moraes, a man far more educated and cultured in the European sense; he was also from a wealthy class and was economically secure. It was the deep knowledge of Brazilian song and rhythmic traditions that Powell brought to his poetic lyrics and which made the tunes they wrote together work so well. The lyrics written by Paulo César Pinheiro are less elegant, but more directly expressively “folk.” They have an authority about them in that they speak from the working classes and to them. Check the wild and celebratory “É de Lei,” or the taut, seductive carnival march of “Cancioneiro,” and the slow, steamy “Faleie Disse,” where the ache in Powell’s voice tells you everything you need to know about the lyrics. This is a wonderful album by Powell, one of his very best, recorded at an artistic peak. That it is available at all in America is a wonder. It should not be missed.

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Baden Powell – Le Monde Musical de Baden Powell (1964) {REPOST}

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Deve Ser Amor – 3:54
Choro Para Metronome – 3:00
Adágio – 3:07
Berimbau – 3:03
Samba Em Prelúdio – 3:30
Chanson D’hiver – 2:27
Samba Triste – 3:33
Berceuse A Jussara – 2:37
Prelude – 2:54
Euridice – 3:05
Bachiana – 4:10
Garota De Ipanema – 2:59

AMG Rating: 3 Stars
Release Date: 2005
Recording Date: 1964
Label: Universal Music France

Baden Powell (git)
Alphonse Masselier (b)
Arthur Motta (dr)
Silvio Silveira (perc)
Paul Mauriat and his orchestra
Francoise Waleh (vcl on “Samba Em Preludio”)

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1964 cover

Linernotes wrote:
Brazilian music is, as its country which is 16 times as big as France, diverse, varied, surprising, subtle and simple all at the same time. This music only asks, as Brazil, for regognition and love. With this album, which is the first he releases in Europe, the guitarist & composer BP presents us a complete palette of his musical world. From African rythms to his personal perceiving of classical european composers, and through delicate reminiscence of melodies from the Antilles, to negro american jazz accents: BP reminds all these influences on his guitar.

He’s 27 years old. Born in Rio. He played since 8 y.o. After having studied in Rio academy, where he improved his style and learned composition, he started like many other, in clubs with little rythmic entities. He eventually showed up in several Tv & radio broadcasts, and his compositions became very popular. He teamed with Tom Jobim, Carlos Lyra, Roberto Menescal for work and tours in several big cities in Brazil. He recorded with Herbie Mann and Jimmy Pratt just before his departure to the US. After some concerts in the Village Vanguard, his friend and poet Vinicius de Moraes made him come to Paris in the late of 63. He gave recitals and tv shows: Living room, musicorama etc… Asked for his guitaristic influences he answers: Segovia, Van Eps, Django are people that are part of the musical world i love. With this record you’ll be able to discover samples from this musical universe.

Here are the themes: DEVE SER AMOR: was recorded using play back device. Baden first recorded the rythmic part with the bass & drums. Afterwards he recorded the melody. The same process was involved with BACHIANA.
CHORO PARA METRONOME is quite a challenge. The choro which was originally an improvisation over folkoric patterns, turns here into a guitar piece. The metronome replaces the whole rythm section. Fitting perfectly with this souless rythm, BP shows here its astounding technique.

The Albinoni ADAGIO and the Bach PRELUDE so seduced the guitarist, that he did want to give a respectful homage to these composers by playing these two pieces.
BERIMBAU is the name of a musical instrument looking like an arc, which is used in the Capoeira. This is a dance which partly look like wrestle, and is done by Nordeste youth, especially in the Bahia area. It is undoubtly of African inspiration.

SAMBA EM PRELUDIO is made of two distincts melodies. Baden plays the first which is in turn played by the orchestra. Then the guitar plays the second theme, and then the two parts are played together, and taken by cello and Francoise Waleh’s voice. CHANSON D’HIVER is the first song that Baden wrote when he came to Paris in December 63.

SAMBA TRISTE opens on a very dark climate and dramatic first part, then the repetitive rythm takes over and leads to the conclusive chords. BERCEUSE A JUSSARA is a delicate composition, dedicated to his little niece “Sobrinha” Jussara. EURIDICE is a Vinicius de Moraes composition, which illustrates the Orphee myth. BACHIANA is a piece written with, once again, Johann S. Bach in mind. GAROTA is a new composition from Tom Jobim and Vinicius. Baden takes it as a basis for a free improvisation, with a complete command on the instrument.
Jacques Lubin, 1964.

Scott Yanow, AMG wrote:
When it was originally released in 1964, this set of music was a bit of a hit, selling over 100,000 copies. Brazilian guitarist-composer Baden Powell was working regularly in France at the time and he is joined on various selections by a French rhythm section and an orchestra. There are also some unaccompanied guitar solos. Listened to over four decades later, much of the music comes across as being overly sweet, safe and sleepy. Powell plays well enough, but the lack of mood variation and the unimaginative arrangements are unfortunate. Since the guitarist rarely gets beyond the melody, the overall results are pleasant background music, nice but predictable. [Universal reissued Le Monde Musical de Baden Powell on CD in 2005.]


Leny Andrade – Estamos Aí (1965)

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Leny Andrade
“Estamos Aí”
Released 1965 on CID/ODEONProduced by Milton Miranda
Orchestral arrangements by Eumir Deodato1-Estamos aí
(Regina Werneck – Maurício Einhorn – Durval Ferreira)
2-A resposta
(Paulo Sergio Valle – Marcos Valle)
3-Pot-pourri:
• Deixa o morro cantar
(Tito Madi)
• O morro não tem vez
(Tom Jobim-Vinicius de Moraes)
• Opinião
(Zé Keti)
• Enquanto a tristeza não vem
(Sergio Ricardo)
• Reza
(Edu Lobo-Ruy Guerra)
4-Clichê
(Maurício Einhorn – Durval Ferreira)
5-Olhando o mar
(Ronaldo Soares – Arthur Verocai)
6-Banzo
(Odilon Olyntho – Marcos Valle)
7-Samba de rei
(Pingarilho – Marcos de Vasconcellos)
8-Tema feliz
(Regina Werneck – Durval Ferreira)
9-Razão de viver
(Paulo Sergio Valle – Eumir Deodato)
10-Esqueça não
(Tito Madi)
11-Samba em Paris
(Nelsinho)
12-Coisa nuvem
(Roberto Nascimento – Victor Freire)

Recorded when she was only 22 years old, this record is what one might call a “powerhouse.” Not only is she performing compositions by a stable-full of the great songwriters of bossa nova — Tito Madi, Marcos Valle, Jobim & Vinicius, Edu Lobo / Ruy Guerra, Zé Keti, and the still under-appreciated Arthur Verocai — she is also one of the most energetic and sophisticated vocalists of the genre. In particular she brings an incredible jazz sensibility and ferocious scat singing to many of these songs. Just last weekend I had the privilege of watching her perform with Roberto Menescal, and was blown away by her phrasing, her scat improvisation, and her voice that is still in top notch shape. Leny Andrade has a place among the greatrdy jazz singers of North America. This record is a delight from start to finish. If you ever have some unlightened person in your house, your apartment, or your car who refers to bossa nova as “elevator music,” put on this record and they will shut the hell up.
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bio from allbrazilianmusic

Born in Rio de Janeiro, Leny Andrade began studying the piano at the age of six. Later on, she sang on radio shows for amateur performers and won a scholarship to study at the Brazilian Conservatory of Music. At 15, Leny debuted as a professional singer as crooner of Permínio Gonçalves’ Orchestra. Subsequently, she performed at the nightclubs Bacará (with Sergio Mendes trio) and Bottle’s Bar. In 1965 she caught the public’s attention with the show “Gemini V”, performing with Pery Ribeiro and Bossa Três at the nightclub Porão 73, and released the live recording of that show. After a successful tour round Argentina, Leny moved to Mexico, where she lived for 5 years. In the 70’s, she made albums that mixed samba with avant-garde music, like “Alvoroço” (73) and “Leny Andrade” (75). In 1979, through Columbia, Leny recorded the LP “Registro”, returning to samba-jazz, a music style that Leny has always mastered.

Performing with renowned artists like Dick Farney, Luiz Eça, Wagner Tiso, Eumir Deodato, Francis Hime, Gilson Peranzzetta and João Donato, Leny Andrade established herself as the best Brazilian jazz singer, due to her outstanding ability to improvise. In the 80’s and 90’s, she divided her time between Brazil and the U.S., where she made several samba-jazz records, including classics like “Luz Neon”, for Eldorado. Leny also paid tribute to samba composers like Cartola and Nelson Cavaquinho. Some of her discs include the songs by composers like Cesar Camargo Mariano (“Nós”), Cristóvão Bastos (“Letra & Música/Tom Jobim) and Romero Lubambo (“Coisa Fina”). Leny also recorded a CD of American standards shaped as bossa nova (“Embraceable You”).

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Alaíde Costa – Coração (1976)

Produced by Milton Nascimento and Mariozinho Rocha

Arrangements – Joao Donato

Joao Donato (piano)
Novelli (bass)
Robertinho Silva (drums)
Nelson Angelo (guitars)
Toninho Horta (electric guitar)
Ivan Lins (piano on track Corpos)
Joao Donato, Beto Guedes, Novelli, Nelson Angelo and Fernando Leporace (backing vocals)

01 – Pai Grande (Milton Nascimento)
02 – O Samba Que Eu Lhe Fiz (Sueli Costa)
03 – Coração (Nelson Ângelo / Ronaldo Bastos)
04 – Catavento (Milton Nascimento)
05 – Quem Sou Eu (Johnny Alf)
06 – Sonho e Fantasia (João Donato / Lysias Ênio)
07 – Corpos (Ivan Lins / Vitor Martins)
08 – Pé Sem Cabeça (Danilo Caymmi / Ana Borba)
09 – Tomara (Novelli / Paulo César Pinheiro / Maurício Tapajós)
10 – Viver de Amor (Toninho Horta / Ronaldo Bastos)
11 – Tempo Calado (Alaíde Costa / Paulo Alberto Ventura)
12 – O Que Se Sabe de Cor (Fernando Leporace)

Another fine album from Alaide Costa, this time with Milton Nascimento producing and the one and only João Donato on keys and arrangements. It’s a fine record, but Milton’s production is a bit on the slick side and, in my opinion, sometimes heavy-handed. Milton was well on the road to international respect as a Brazilian jazz-pop-fusion star, but this record sees him still clinging to some of the charms of the Clube da Esquina period. A bunch of the players from that Minas Gerais scene are here, and the repetoire includes songs penned by Toninho Horta, Nelson Angelo, Ronaldo Bastos, and of course Milton. The first song is from the latter’s 1970 album, where it received a much more psychedelic performance, and frankly this one leaves me cold but I suppose Milton wanted to make sure we knew he was producing this. But lest we forget of Alaíde’s bossa nova roots, we move right along with “O Samba Que Eu Lhe Fiz” and soon after, the highlight of this album for me — her version of Johnny Alf’s “Quem Sou Eu.” Other standout tracks are Danilo Caymi / Ana Borba’s “Pem Se Cabeça,” and “Viver de Amor” from Horta & Bastos, both songs bringing a bossa-informed MPB sound that suits Alaíde’s style quite nicely. The closer, “O Que Se Sabe De Cor,” is everything that makes Alaíde will leave you, well, wanting more as the alternate title says. The orchestration from Donato is very good throughout, helping keep things interesting in a set of songs that tend to stay around the same mid-tempo pace.

Nara Leão – O Canto Livre de Nara (1965)

nara leao
nara leao

NARA LEÃO
O Canto Livre de Nara
1965, Philips #632.748
CD reissue, 2002 Japan release (courtesy of Kung)

Nara Leão was a very busy woman in the 1960s. After all it is not easy being The Muse of Bossa Nova. By 1965, however, she was broadening the scope of her work to incorporate “musica engajada,” a type of protest folk music that was gaining momentum in the wake of the 1964 military coup and the dictatorship that followed and would endure for twenty years. The first song, Corisco, is from the film Deus e Diabo na Terra do Sol released the previous year, a film directed by Glauber Rocha, who co-wrote the song.. Probably the pinnacle of the Cinema Novo movement, and certainly its best-known offering, this song would have been an immediate cultural reference point to the students, artists, and intellectuals that were following Cinema Novo. The song was the main theme for the character of the same name, a lieutenant of the bandit Lampião. Lampião has honorary status as Brazil’s equivalent of Robin Hood, a bit of a hyperbolic comparison since Lampião wasn’t quite as discriminating in, um, dispensation of vigilante justice. In fact he was as feared by the rural poor as he was by the wealthy landowners of the northeast Brazilian backlands, and it was only during and after the Brazilian military pursued and hunted his gang that he became an icon of peasant resistance. Brazil had just changed from being a monarchy to a Republican government. For a variety of complicated reasons – including the fact that the monarchy ended slavery in Brazil (the last place in the Western Hemisphere to do so) as one of its last official acts – the fall of the monarchy was not quite the occasion to celebrate that one might imagine. In fact there was a growing sense among the rural poor that they were getting a raw deal, and the early years of the Republic saw an efflorescence of various kinds of protest, unrest, revolts, millenarian movements… Deus e o Diabo na Terra do Sol deals with all of this, including a direct reference to the “colony” of Canudos led by messianic itinerant preacher Antônio Conselheiro, a place which promised redemption to thousands of rural poor seeking a release from the stranglehold of sharecropping and other types of tenant arrangements left in the wake of slavery. Canudos grew to somewhere in the area of 35,000 people, and concerned the new government enough for them to send the military to put a stop to it — which, eventually and after several attempts where the army was embarrassingly beaten back — they eventually did. With a bloody and brutal massacre which became an emblem of the “order and progress” that was, no matter how you want to analyze it, built upon the blood, sweat, and brutality of a slavocratic system.

Why is this important to a Nara Leão album in 1965? Because the story of Canudos is known by all Brazilians. It is part of the curriculum of the school system. Euclides da Cunha immortalized it in his book Os Sertões, an instant classic that went into numerous reprintings almost immediately and was translated into English by the 1940s. The story of Lampião, his lover Maria Bonita, and their band of merry madmen is equally party of the cultural fabric. When Glauber Rocha made these two scenarios a central part of a film released in 1964, he was doing so for a reason. I am no film scholar, but his lens captures visually and narrates both the optimism for change and the anguish of seeing it thwarted. Repeatedly. Cyclically. In Rocha’s narrative, the cattle rustler Manuel is done wrong and taken advantage one time too many by a wealthy ‘coronel’ or rural boss, and he murders him during a fight over his pay. He flees with his wife to the “Holy Mountain”, the analog of Canudos mentioned above. That, well.. that doesn’t work out so well either, and he ends up seeking refuge once more, this time with what is left of Lampião’s band, now led by his lieutenant, the rather ill-tempered and erratic Corisco (also an actual historic figure). The song that follows Corisco’s character throughout the film is an unfolding variation on one musical theme, really. Also titled elsewhere, “Perseguição” (Persecution), the lyrics alternate between a coronel’s command to “deliver Corisco” to answer for his crimes and a peasant’s refusal to do so. The song contains the memorable lines of prophecy, repeated elsewhere in all manner of songs, films, books — “O sertão vai vira o mar, e o mar vai vira sertão” — The desert will turn into the sea, and the sea will turn to desert.

Nara Leão was not randomly choosing this song to open up her album. She had thrown in her lot with the “música engajada” crowd, best typified in the work of Geraldo Vandré, Zé Keti and João do Vale. She had participated in a show with Keti and João do Vale that was also released on record in 196, and their material dominates this record. This new protest music was drawing on the musical traditions of forró, xote, and baião. Deeply northeastern in melodic and rhythmic structure, and alongside the rather long ‘Fisherman’s Suite’ of Dorival Caymmi, the inclusion of this material in Nara Leão’s repertoire makes it pretty clear that we are no longer solely dealing with the beaches of Ipanema and Leblon here. The final song is an anonymously authored tune in the public domain, a song sung by holy men and women in the northeast who would make their livelihood from praying day and night , which Nara mixes with a stanza from the modernist-yet-archetypically-Northeastern poet João Cabral de Melo Netto.

Don’t believe me? The liner notes from Ferreira Gullar write of Nara consciously pursuing and deepening the road she had set out on with her ‘Opinão’ album, of augmenting her role as a singer with that of interpreting “the problems and aspirations of her people.” He writes of Nara wanting to use her voice to “bring… to the largest possible number of people, a contemporary undrestanding of the Brazilian reality, that she feels and identifies in the compositions of Caymmi, of João do Vola, of Zé Keti, of Edu Lobo, of Vinicius and of many others.” According to Gullar, Nara was interested in communicating through song a form of discussion, of dialog with a public. In 1965, the dreams of the post-Kubitschek Brazilian left for a more just society had not yet faded. Both the ideas of “dialog” and even of “a public” to have it with still seemed plausible.

“To sing of love and of life, the love that belongs to all as life does. To sing of solidarity, of peace, and of liberty. Nara discovered that it is possible and it is necessary to make into a reality the idea that all men are equal and that, as a singer, she can contribute to this. And Nara contributes to this as much when she sings of the suffering of the landless peasant, as when she interprets an old samba love-song. Because, to bring together these themes seemingly so different, she teaches us, in the knowledge of her youth, that love, peace, labor, and liberty are synonymous with life.”

Oh, and the music? Yes, well, that is pretty damn good too. The populist vanguardisms are tempered by lean ensemble work, laying out a jazz groove for Nara to carry on her work of conscientização. The band is led by the ubiquitous Luiz Eça, best known for being at the heart of the Tamba Trio. Also helping out with musical coordination is Dori Caymmi. The lineup looks like this:

Luiz Eça – piano
Bass – Bebeto
Drums – Ohana
Flute – Bebeto
Guitar – Dor
i Caymmi
Backing vocals – Peter and his voice orchestra…

Nara Leão – O Canto Livre de Nara (1965)
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