Wilson Simonal – Alegria! Alegria! Vol. 3 & 4 (1969)

Booklet notes:

Recorded under the uncontrollable shadow of the hit “Sá Marina”, Alegrie Alegria Vol 3, or Cada Um Tem o Disco que Merece, is a move in the direction toward a maturation of a style, of unity in the middle of the diversity that the public had already accustomed itself with Simonal. “Sá Marina” (from Alegria Vol. 2) loaned its soul-music romanticism to various songs on the album. “Meia Volta (Ana Cristina), “Moça” and “Aleluia Aleluia” all from Antonio Adolfo and Tibério Gaspar, are the clearest examples. But practically the whole album is calm and serene. From the delicate “Menininha do Portão” to the rhythm and blues “na lingua da matriz” of “What You Say,” Simonal and Som Três move their music into an area that is more adult, and more black. The reinterpretations of classics attest to this: ‘Pensando em ti” brings bassoons and flugelhorns to the old hit by Nelson Gonçalves; “Prece ao Vento” uses the riff from “Sunny”, a classic by Elizeth Cardoso; “Atire a Primeira Pedra” plays with Atualfo Alves for a generation enchanted with ‘Barbarella’.

Simonal and Som Três also grew in structure. Cesar debuts his electric piano and the synthesized sounds to the tone of different songs (especially “Mustang Cor de Sangue”). Sabá begins using to the electric-acoustic bass common to salsa groups. Also the “brass with mushrooms” (??) gain force here too, with the arrival of Aurino, Darcy and the singer’s brother, José Roberto Simonal, joining with the veterans Maurílio and Juarez. It is this era that saw the vertiginous sky-rocketing professional ascension of Simonal, exploding after his performance at Maracanãzinho on July 5, 1969, when the singer stole the show from Sergio Mendes and was dragged back to the stage by 30,000 fans. Soon after this show, Simonal joined up with Shell in a series of mega-events that brought him back to the sports arena, repeating the success of his first presentation.

The photo of this second show adorns the cover of Alegria! Aelgria! Vol.4. The alternative title (Homage to the Grace, Beauty, Charm and the Venom of the Brazilian Woman) comes from that which, maybe, could be the biggest hit of his career: “País Tropical,” composed by Jorge Ben and freely adapted by the singer, who cut entire passages of the lyrics, changed other parts, and through it created the expression “patropi”. Nothing seemed to conatin this great, exciting phase of Wilson Simonal.

—Ricardo Alexandre
Journalist and author of the biography “Nem Vem Que Não Tem: A Vide e o Veneno de Wilson Simonal”

Free translation by Flabbergast

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ALEGRIA, ALEGRIA VOL. 3 ou CADA UM TEM O DISCO QUE MERECE
Wilson Simonal (1969)
Released in April of 1969 as Odeon MOFB 3576

1 Silva lenheira
(Jorge Ben)
2 Mustang cor de sangue
(Paulo Sergio Valle, Marcos Valle)
3 Menininha do portão
(Nonato Buzar, Paulinho Tapajós)
4 Silêncio
(Eduardo Souto Neto, Sergio Bittencourt)
5 Prece ao vento
(Gilvan Chaves, Fernando Luiz Câmara, Alcyr Pires Vermelho)
6 What you say
(Wilson Simonal)
7 Moça
(Tibério Gaspar, Antônio Adolfo)
8 Aleluia aleluia
(Tibério Gaspar, Antônio Adolfo)
9 Mamãe eu quero
(Vicente Paiva, Jararaca)
10 Meia-volta (Ana Cristina)
(Tibério Gaspar, Antônio Adolfo)
11 Pensando em ti
(Herivelto Martins, David Nasser)
12 Atira a primeira pedra
(Ataulfo Alves, Mário Lago)
13 Mulher de malandro
(Celso Castro, Oswaldo Nunes)

BONUS TRACK
14. Se Você Pensa
(Roberto Carlos / Erasmo Carlos)

Recorded in November 1968, January and March 1969
Arrangements and orchestration, César Camargo Mariano (1-3,5,6,8-10, 12) Laércio de Freitas (13), Erlon Chaves (4,7,11).
Artistic director: Milton Mrianda
Musical director: Lyrio Panicali
Technical director: Z.J.Merky
Sound engineer: Jorge Teixeira da Rocha
Mixing and editing of the LP: Reny Rizzi Lippi
Art director: Moacyr Rocha
Photos: Studio Maitiry

Som Três: Cesar Camargo Mariano (piano), Sabá (upright bass and voice), Toninho Pinheiro (drums and voice).

Brass: Aurino (baritone sax), José Roberto SImonal (alto sax), Maurilio and Darcy (trumpets), and Juarez (tenor sax)
Electric guitar: Geraldo Vespar
Percussion: Chacau

Bonus track recorded in July and released by Odeon as since 7B 380 in August 1969.

ALEGRIA, ALEGRIA VOL. 4 ou HOMENAGEM À GRAÇA, À BELEZA, AO CHARME E AO VENENO DA MULHER BRASILEIRA

Odeon MOFB 3613 released November 1969

15 Maquilagem
(Nonato Buzar, Wilson Simonal)
16 Porque hoje é domingo
(Tibério Gaspar, Antônio Adolfo)
17 Evie
(Jimmy Webb)
18 Brasileira
(Sergio Augusto, Rubinho)
19 Olho d’água
(Nonato Buzar, Paulinho Tapajós)
20 Canção da criança
(René Bittencourt, Francisco Alves)
21 Eu fui ao Tororó
(Foclore)
22 Que maravilha
(Jorge Ben, Toquinho)
23 Uma loira
(Hervé Cordovil)
24 Quem mandou
(Sergio Bittencourt, Eduardo Souto)
25 País tropical
(Jorge Ben)
26 Adios, muchachos / Adios
(César Vedani, J.C.Sanders. E. Madrigeura)

Recorded in July, October, and November of 1969.

Arrangements, orchestration, horn charts: Cesar Camargo Mariano (15,16,18-24,25) Lyrio Panicali (17), Erlon Chaves (18,26)

Musician credits and technical credits same as Alegria Alegria Vol 3

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Reissue info:
Remastered in 24 bits and digitally edited from the original master tapes by Carlos Freitas and Jade Pereira at Classic Master, São Paulo, in February 2004.
Production and project coordination: Max de Castro and Wilson Simoninha
Reproduction of original album covers: Rogério Alonso

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One more Simonal brings us two more albums full of joy in this series. Tons of gems here, with the hard-swing accompaniment of Som Três. More songs by Jorge Ben, Antonio Adolfo & Tibério Gaspar — definitely moving into more soul territory here. There is even a cover of a rather obscure song, Evie, by Jimmy Webb (By The Time I Get To Phoenix, Wichita Lineman, and the notorious MacArthur Park). On that song Wilson’s singing in English has improved from “What You Say” (on Vol.3), which is pretty frankly awful but also charming in its awful-ness.

These four albums of ‘Alegria! Alegria!’ mark a hugely important phase in Simonal’s career and in many ways, taken as a whole, could be the centerpiece of his discography. There was a live album (show em Simonal) released in the middle of them, recorded earlier in 1967, that I may share here although frankly it is kind of for the die-hard obsessive collectors (more details later).

More ALEGRIA for the holiday seasons from Flabbergasted Vibes!

Wilson Simonal – Alegria! Alegria! Vol. 3 & 4 (1969) in 320 kbs em pee three


Wilson Simonal – Alegria! Alegria! Vol. 3 & 4 (1969) in FLAC LOSSLESS AUDIO

Complete artwork included. Composer credits are included in the ID tags, as well as restored Portuguese orthographic and diacriticals.

Joe Cuba Sextet – Bustin' Out (1972)

The Joe Cuba Sextet
“Bustin’ Out” (1972)
Vampi Records CD 019

Whereas Joe Cuba’s 60s output was prolific to the point of flooding the market with boogaloo, his releases in the 1970s were spaced pretty far apart. This one catches the Sextet somewhere between their 60s sound and a new sensibility taking cues from Eddie Palmieri and the Harlem River Drive band. The single from the album was Pud-Da-Din b/w Ooh! Ya, and the track “Do You Feel It” with its almost-social-commentary-rap has made it to a few Latin soul compilations. While the shorter cuts are certainly groovy and all, my favorite on this is Joe Cuba’s Madness Parts 1 & 2 (actually separated by silence, presumably for another 7-inch release). Instrumental jamming co-authored with Charlie Palmieri, Cuba’s long-time musical director.

01 – What a Baby
02 – Pud-Da-Din
03 – Ain’t it Funny What Love Can Do
04 – Ooh! Ya
05 – Do You Feel It
06 – A Thousand Ways
07 – Joe Cuba’s Madness Part 1
08 – Joe Cuba’s Madness Part2

Produced by Joe Cain. Original release on Tico Records.

Ray Barretto – The Message (1972) 320kbs

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Ray Barretto
“The Message”
Released 1972, Fania Records
Release Date Jul 17, 2007
Studio/Live Studio
Mono/Stereo Stereo
Producer Ray Barretto
Engineer Irv Greenbaum
Recording Time 35 minutes
Personnel Ray Barretto – congas
Orestes Vilato – timbales
Andy Gonzalez – bass
Roberto Rodriguez – trumpet
Johnny “Dandy” Rodriguez – bongos
Rene Lopez
Joseph “Papy” Roman
Louis Cruz – piano

From Dusty Groove
One of Ray Barretto’s hardest-hitting salsa albums of the 70s — a raw set of grooves that’s got Ray moving away from the playfulness of the Latin Soul years, into a more righteous mode that’s easily guessed at from the title of the set! The vibe here is very straightforward — with Ray coming down hard on conga, and working with a group that features Adalberto Santiago on lead vocals, plus Orestes Vilato on timbales, Andy Gonzalez on bass, and Luis Cruz on piano. The sound is spare and raw — and titles include the wonderfully echoey tune “O Elefante”, with some great elephant-like work on trumpet — plus “Con El Cimarron”, “Se Traba”, “Arrepientete”, and “Te Traigo Mi Son”.

Review by José A. Estévez, Jr.

Bandleader/conga player Ray Barretto continued to assert himself as one of the premier mainstream salsa catalysts of the early ’70s with one of his most celebrated albums. Barretto, bass player Andy Gonzalez, pianist/arranger Louis Cruz, timbales master Orestes Vilató, and bongo player Johnny Rodríguez contribute to the band’s tough rhythm section; of course, vocalist Adalberto Santiago is a knockout on tunes like the hilarious “Se Traba” and the memorable “Alma Con Alma.” One of Barretto’s top albums of the 1970s and another example of what made New York salsa so special.

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Ray Barretto looking curiously like Al Franken….

Ray Barretto – The Message (1972) 320kbs em pee three

Ray Barretto – Acid (1968) VBR

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{2001 French pressing with bonus tracks}

RAY BARRETTO – Acid (1968)VBR

Psychedelic salsa? Not quite, except for the occasional Austin Powers-isms like “yeah, baby” and “sock it to me”. But this is a landmark record and needs to be in the collection of any fan of salsa or Latin soul. The closing track is the most ‘out’ of any of them and for me is worth the price of admission all on its own.

Tracks (of the original LP)
1. El Nuevo Barretto (Barretto) – 5:50
2. Mercy, Mercy, Baby (Barretto) – 2:44
3. Acid (Barretto) – 5:05
4. Deeper Shade of Soul (Barretto) – 2:46
5. Soul Drummers (Barretto) – 3:48
6. Sola Te Dejare (Barretto/Lopez) – 3:49
7. Teacher of Love (Barretto/Cruz) – 2:27
8. Espiritu Libre (Barretto) – 8:27

Players
Ray Barretto – Percussion, Congas, Vocals
Big Daddy – Bass
Rene Lopez – Trumpet
Roberto Rodriguez – Trumpet
Adalberto Santiago – Vocals, Bells
Orestes Vilato – Timbales
Pete Bonet – Vocals, Guiro

BONUS TRACKS ( I do not know where Sony got these tracks from.. No information in the booklet. Production sounds like early 70s. Anyone with session/line-up data feel free to comment and enlighten me!)

9. Guarare
10. Vina Pa’Echar Candela
11. Vale Mas Un Guaguanco
12. Canto Abuaco
13. Eras

REVIEW from John Ballon at ‘allaboutjazz dot com’
By the time 1968 rolled around, Ray Barretto was a celebrated studio session player whose hard-driving conga rhythms could be heard all over the records of Dizzy Gillespie, Cal Tjader, Cannonball Adderley, and countless others. Once he dropped Acid onto the music world, Barretto firmly established a reputation for himself as an innovator in his own right.

Like the drug itself, Acid had a mind-expanding influence on everyone, allowing for a far more adventurous and eclectic edge to slip into New York’s Latin music scene. A lot less psychedelic than its title and cover might lead you to believe, Acid remains one of the most far-out fusions of Latin and soul music ever conceived.

Catchy as hell, the records four original Latin/soul numbers (”Mercy, Mercy Baby”, “The Soul Drummers”, “A Deeper Shade of Soul” and “Teacher of Love”) are obscure classics loaded with plenty of vintage ’60s soul references—punchy James Brown and Stax Records sounding horns, thickly grooving bass lines, fat-back drums, and cliché soul catch-phrases such as “What I say,” “Lord have mercy,” “Come on, come on baby” and “Sock it to me!”

El Nuevo Barretto (The New Barretto)” opens the album on familiar ground, with its high-energy boogaloo-styled salsa sung passionately in Spanish. With the second track, “Mercy, Mercy Baby,” the sound shifts dramatically as soul gets a serious drenching in hot sauce. The band chants “Mercy, Mercy Baby” behind Memphis-styled horns, catchy lyrics, timbales, and Barretto’s kicking congas. The title track, “Acid,” opens up sparsely with a lazy hypnotic bass and percussion groove over which stretches the muted trumpet sounds of Rene Lopez (who was soon to be drafted and shipped off to Vietnam). After a rock-steady timbales solo by Orestes Vilato, the band begins calling out “Barretto, Barretto,” and master Ray steps forward, obliging them with one of his most fiery and intense conga solos ever. The lyrics on “The Soul Drummers” totally sums up the record: “Have you heard them cooking / The Soul Drummers / well they play so cool / Soul Drummers / so hard to resist / Soul Drummers / with the African twist.”

The album’s most psychedelic soul sounds can be heard on its closing track, the appropriately titled “Espiritu Libre (Free Spirit).” This instrumental opens with some pretty far out-there trumpet statements that sound as if they could’ve come straight off of Bitches Brew—pretty advanced stuff for a 1968 Latin record! The track builds into a full blown drum-heated jam flavored with odd rhythmic time-signatures, passionate brass, and feverish bass lines, bringing the album to a satisfying peak that leaves you in bad need of a smoke.

Acid turned on a lot of important players with its irresistible blending of Latin and soul music, significantly helping to bring about the rise of the Afro-Latin funk revolution.