Selda Bagcan – Selda (1976) *Repost*

Back by popular demand! This is in fact one of the most visited and commented-upon albums featured on this blog since it was posted a year and a half ago. Now it comes complete with a FLAC set for my fellow audiofreaks. I have sort of drifted away from the idea of sharing or writing about the interesting Anatolian psych scene in favor of focusing on other musics, but I might revisit that territory more often this year. Who knows.

Don’t let the folky cover fool you, the music is much more far-out psychedelic folk (of the Turkish variety) than it would lead you to believe. Fuzzy guitars, electric oud, Moog and other analog synths are all layered over and under her powerful voice. In fact most of Selda’s subsequent records are apparently more in the traditional vein of pop/folk songstress. Quite a bit of this is still psychedelic-tinged dreamy folk, sometimes wading into prog-rock waters (which is okay by me), and occasionally downright funky. My personal favorites in this set are ‘Yaz Gazeteci Yaz’ and ‘Yaylalar’ but the whole record is extremely engaging and ’tis hard to chose. I wish I could understand the lyrics because this IS protest music, engaged with the social problems of life under the oppressive right-wing regime of the mid 70s. I prefer to contextualize the posts on this blog in their historical context but this one is a bit outside my reach.

So here are some reviews and info:

Selda Bagcan – Selda (1976) [FLAC]
2006, Finders Keepers Records/B-Music BMS004

1. Meydan Sizindir (3:39)
2. Yaz Gazeteci Yaz (2:45)
3. Mehmet Emmi (3:21)
4. Nasirli Eller (3:38)
5. Ince Ince (3:42)
6. Gine Haber Gelmis (4:54)
7. Yaylalar (3:48)
8. Dam Ustune Cul Serer (3:47)
9. Dost Uyan (3:02)
10. Gitme (4:12)
11. Niye Cattin Kaslarini (3:15)
12. Kizil Dere (3:41)

Bonus Tracks:

13. Utan Utan (2:52)
14. Karaoglan (4:00)
15. Eco’ya Donder Beni (2:57)
16. Anayasso (3:03)
17. Nem Kaldi (3:47)

Total: 60:23

(REVIEWS)

Embodying all the aesthetic watermarks of a private press country LP, Selda’s
debut long player from 1976, Istanbul, has masqueraded as lamb dressed as mutton
throwing many a discerning wolf from the gourmet scent. Behold! Space age,
Anatolian, electronic, progressive-protest, and psych-folk-funk-rock from the
Middle-East.

Fusing Selda’s radical prose with equally radical musical gestures from some of
the most lorded musical mavericks was a match made in psychedelic heaven.
Artists such as Andalou beat combo Mogollar (Also known to a growing French
audience as Les Mogol) along with the talents of Turkish rock stalwart Arif Sag
and master electronic producer and pioneer Zafer Dilek (whom would later gain
critical acclaim amongst collectors of Turkish library music.) Each of these
artists involved in the recording of this album are considered the cream-of-the-
crop amongst Eastern Psych aficionados. In recent years, the legacy of Turkish
progressive rock has been gaining popularity amongst DJs, producers and record
collectors as an unrivalled source for unique sounds rarely found in other
genres of international music and, until now, rarely heard outside their native
environment.

——————————–another review—————————-

Finders Keepers continues in it’s mission to unearth some of the finest
treasures the Western world has never seen with this incredible 1976 album from
Turkish radical folk singer Selda Bagcan.

Part of Finders Keepers’ ‘Anatolian Invasion’ series, this particular record
stirred up quite a fuss among the world’s Turkish communities on it’s release,
achieving a certain notoriety for Selda herself as she proclaimed unashamedly
her thoughts on freedom of speech and quality of life.

So it’s political, we’ve got that down, but since most of us don’t speak any
Turkish we need to get hooked on the music itself, which mercifully isn’t a
tough task. Harnessing the genre-bending talents of a number of Turkish musical
free-thinkers she managed to conjure up a record that was equal parts
experimental and pure Middle Eastern pop, blending elements of folk, psych,
rock, prog and proto-electronica.

To be quite honest this is a record that simply has to be heard to be believed,
Selda’s voice is a marvel and complemented by such peculiar backing tracks
produces a record that stands head and shoulders over the competition.

There seems to be a bubbling of interest in Middle Eastern psych at the moment,
but I must say that Selda’s debut album is a real eye-opener. You don’t have to
know anything about psychedelic folk or Middle Eastern pop to glean enjoyment
from Selda, this is inclusive, intense, hugely enjoyable music and is as
essential as they come. Just buy it.

password: vibes

Paulo Diniz – Quero Voltar pra Bahia (1970)

Photobucket

PAULO DINIZ
“Quero Voltar Pra Bahia”

1970
Odeon
MOFB 3664

1 – Piri Piri

(Odibar – Paulo Diniz)

2 – Um chope pra distrair

(Odibar – Paulo Diniz)

3 – Ninfa mulata

(Odibar – Paulo Diniz)

4 – Quero voltar pra Bahia

(Odibar – Paulo Diniz)

5 – Felicidade

(Lupicínio Rodrigues)

6 – Marginal III

(Odibar – Paulo Diniz)

7 – Chutando pedra

(Nenéo)

8 – Chega

(Odibar – Paulo Diniz)

9 – Canseira

(Odibar – Paulo Diniz)

10 – Ponha um arco-íris na sua moringa

(Odibar – Paulo Diniz)

11 – Me leva

(Nanuk)

12 – Sujeito chato

From cliquemusic

Nascido no interior de Pernambuco, foi para Recife trabalhar como crooner e baterista em casas noturnas. Foi locutor e ator de rádio e televisão, em Pernambuco e no Ceará. Em 1964 foi para o Rio de Janeiro, onde trabalhou na Rádio Tupi e passou a compor com mais freqüência. Sua primeira gravação saiu em 1966, com a música “O Chorão”. Quatro anos depois lançou dois LPs, e em seguida dedicou-se à tarefa de musicalizar poemas de língua portuguesa de autores como Carlos Drummond de Andrade (“E Agora, José?”), Gregório de Matos (“Definição do Amor”), Augusto dos Anjos (“Versos Íntimos”), Jorge de Lima (“Essa Nega Fulô”) e Manuel Bandeira (“Vou-me Embora pra Pasárgada”). Suas músicas foram gravadas por Clara Nunes, Emílio Santiago, Simone e outros. Entre seus sucessos destacam-se “Pingos de Amor”, gravado por vários intérpretes, “Canoeiro”, “Um Chopp pra Distrair”, “I Want to Go Back to Bahia” (uma homenagem a Caetano Veloso, então exilado em Londres) e “Quem Tem um Olho É Rei”, todas em parceria com Odibar.

——————————-

The first time I put this record on I thought to myself, “Groovy, man, groovy…”, and my second thought was, wow, this guy has a voice like a Brazilian Neil Diamond with a less emotive voice and more restricted range. Now, it depends on your personal taste whether or not this is a good thing, but I have a soft spot for Mr. Diamond and so kept an open mind. The album cover is much more psychedelic than anything you will hear in its contents, a visual tribute to the hit title song which was intended as an homage to then-exiled Caetano Veloso. Musically the record is in some weird plane of existance where Jovem Guarda, Tropicália, and Brazilian soul music, and harpsichord-laden baroque pop mingle and mutate. I can imagine Raul Seixas — who had yet to realize a solo album at this point — grooving out to this record. I think the main flaw in this record is that Diniz sings virtually every single tune the same way, with an overly-blown out belting that doesn’t have the nuance his own songs sometimes call for. It’s probably because of this that he is better known as the author of songs made famous by others. But this obscure little gem is rewarding for any fan of Brazilian music or early 70’s psych-inflected pop-rock. In addition to the title song, other highlights include “Felicidade” (not the bossa nova tune, but a reworking of Lupicínio Rodrigues), “Chutando Pedra”, and the gorgeous “Chega.”

Paulo Diniz – Quero Voltar pra Bahia (1970) in 320 kbs mp3

16-bit 44.1 khz

password: vibes