Ananda Shankar and His Music (1975)

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Ananda Shankar
“Ananda Shankar and his Music”
Released 1975
CD- Fass Records, Spain

WIKI PEDIA ARTICLE

Ananda Shankar (11 December 1942 – 26 March 1999) was an Bengali musician best known for fusing Western and Eastern musical styles. He was married to Tanushree Shankar.
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Early life

Ananda Shankar

Born in Almora in Uttar Pradesh, India, Shankar was the son of Amala and Uday Shankar, popular dancers, and also the nephew of renowned sitarist Pandit Ravi Shankar. Ananda did not learn sitar from his uncle but studied instead with Dr. Lalmani Misra in Varanasi.

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Professional career

In the late 1960s Shankar travelled to Los Angeles, where he played with many contemporary musicians including Jimi Hendrix. There he was signed to Reprise Records and released his first self-titled album in 1970, featuring original Indian classical material alongside sitar-based cover versions of popular hits such as The Rolling Stones’ “Jumpin’ Jack Flash” and “[[The Doors]’ “Light My Fire”. This album has become an enduring cult classic.[citation needed]

Returning to India in the early 1970s Shankar continued to experiment musically and in 1975 released his most critically acclaimed album, Ananda Shankar And His Music, a jazz-funk mix of Eastern sitar, Western rock guitar, tabla and mridangam, drums and Moog synthesizers. Out of print for many years, Ananda Shankar And His Music was re-released on CD in 2005.

After working in India during the late 1970s and 1980s, Shankar’s profile in the West began to rise again in the mid-1990s as his music found its way into club DJ sets, particularly in London. His music was brought to a wider audience with the release of Blue Note Records’ popular 1996 rare groove compilation album, Blue Juice Vol. 1., featuring the two standout tracks from Ananda Shankar And His Music, “Dancing Drums” and “Streets Of Calcutta”.

In the late 1990s Shankar worked and toured in the United Kingdom with London DJ State of Bengal and others, a collaboration that would result in the Walking On album, featuring Shankar’s trademark sitar soundscapes mixed with breakbeat and hip hop. Walking On was released in 2000 after Shankar’s sudden death from heart failure the year before.

In 2005, his song Raghupati was used on the Grand Theft Auto: Liberty City Stories soundtrack, and in 2008 his song Dancing Drums was used on the LittleBigPlanet soundtrack.
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Discography

* Ananda Shankar, 1970 (LP, Reprise 6398)
* Ananda Shankar, 1970 (CD, Collectors’ Choice CCM-545)
* Ananda Shankar And His Music, 1975 (EMI India)
* Missing You, 1977 (EMI India)
* A Musical Discovery of India, 1978 (EMI India)
* Sa-Re-Ga Machan, 1981 (EMI India)
* 2001, 1984 (EMI India)
* Ananda, 1999 (EMI India)
* Arpan, 2000 (EMI India)
* Walking On, 2000 (Real World 48118-2, with State of Bengal)
* Ananda Shankar: A Life in Music – The Best of the EMI Years, 2005 (Times Square TSQ-CD-9052)
* Ananda Shankar: Shubh- The Auspicious, 1995
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Grand Theft Auto:Liberty City Stories

His singing voice is heard in the game Grand Theft Auto:Liberty City Stories in the radio station Radio del Mundo. The song he’s singing there is Raghupati

Holy smokes is this album a delight for the ears! Fans of trippy rock, funk, weird film scores, Bollywood grooves from the 70s, and anyone else with the least bit of musical eclecticism should flock to Ananda Shankar like geese in the springtime! Tunes range from blissed-out funk that makes you want to paint your skin and go-go, to the delicate and gorgeous (“Vidai (Parting)” and the epic-length “Dawn”). The CD is taken from a vinyl copy and there is some surface noise in places, but this quickly becomes unnoticeable to me as the sound is full and rich.

As described by a friend: “The opener The Street of Calcutta Rocks your butt a big time but the very next one i.e. Cyrus mends your heart. ” Nicely put.
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Dusty Groove description / review:

One of the greatest albums ever by one of the most compelling figures in Indian music! Ananda Shankar’s been chronicled elsewhere and often on these pages — so by this point, you probably already know that he’s a renegade pioneer who combined funky grooves with sitars and tablas, forging a whole new sound in Indian music that’s still having quite a bit of influence today. This 1975 album is a stunner — way more open-minded than his other album for Reprise (which we’ve also got on reissue!), with tracks that push the funky groove a lot farther than you’d expect, swirling percussion, organ, guitar, tablas, moog, and sitar all together into an unbelievable sound that will leave you breathless! Titles include “Dancing Drums”, “Streets Of Calcutta”, “Back Home”, “Renunciation”, “Dawn”, and “The Lonely Rider”.
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Includes artwork at 600 dpi, log, cue, m3u, and a free sandwich.

Ananda Shankar and His Music (1975) in 320kbs

Ananda Shankar and His Music (1975) in FLAC LOSSLESS

Grant Green – Live at Club Mozambique (1971)

Only Idris Muhammad and Ronnie Foster are held over from the famous line-up “Alive!” record from the previous year, but this one is featuring Supreme Court Justice Clarence Thomas on sax, so how can you go wrong?! The absence of vibes and percussion means the band sheds a little texture, but the resulting lean sound is its own reward.Log, cue, m3u, artwork, and ham sandwich included!

 

Release Date Jul 18, 2006
Studio/Live Studio
Mono/Stereo Stereo
Producer Francis WolffAlign Center
Engineer Ed Greene
Personnel Ronnie Foster – organ
Grant Green – guitar
Idris Muhammad – drums
Houston Person – tenor saxophone
Clarence Thomas – sopranino saxophone, tenor saxophonePersonnel: Grant Green (guitar); Clarence Thomas (sopranino saxophone, tenor saxophone); Houston Person (tenor saxophone); Ronnie Foster (organ); Idris Muhammad (drums).Mojo (Publisher) (p.127) – 4 stars out of 5 — “Guitarist and band deliver a bonanza of funk-fuelled jazz grooves.”—————————————————————————-
By Norman Weinstein at allaboutjazz dot comThis is some apotheosis of both jazz-funk and Grant Green, just when you thought Blue Note was practicing overexposure by adding yet another Green disk to last year’s three discs worth of funky compilations. But this live session, which spent 35 years in the vault, transcends all previous Grant Green funk sessions by a mile.

A lot of the credit has to go to the pluperfect chemistry of the band. Green may have been Blue Note’s most erratic artist of the ’60s and ’70s, but the key to his best work involved matching him with a drummer who kept him steady and on-task. Art Blakey did this for the bop-flavored Green, and Idris Muhammad did it during his funk period. Muhammad enlivened a lot of other Green sessions, though, so part of the magic of this gem needs to be explained by the fiery tenor saxophonist Houston Person and the totally obscure but piercing soprano saxophonist Clarence Thomas, perhaps woodshedding to get through law school (just kidding).

The eight tunes are nothing special, often one or two-chord pieces that the band dances around with uncanny creativity. “Walk On By” seems an odd tune in this context, but maybe the lyrics touched some sappy sentimentality in Green’s heart. No matter. The musicians ruthlessly rip into it until they sound like a house band at a fundraiser for the ’71 Oakland, California Black Panthers. The crowd, however, sounds comatose, which is perhaps a plus, since a rowdy, drunk audience might have interfered with hearing the tasty licks.

The title of the final track sums up Grant Green’s career as well as this generously programmed 76-minute funk fest: “I Am Somebody.” I think it took Green a lot of years to figure out the somebody he was. This recording is evidence that at the end of his life, he did find his truest musical identity. He was a fierce funk improviser, and no studio session caught the fire—but this live session does.
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From Dusty Groove

A rare funky treasure — lost live material from Grant Green’s hippest years at Blue Note — presented here for the first time ever ! The set’s an incredibly smoking one — with loads of long tracks that really stretch out in a hard-hitting, bottom-heavy funky mode — no surprise, considering that Idris Muhammad’s on drums, as part of a lineup that also includes Ronnie Foster, Houston Person, and Clarence Thomas! The groove here is a bit more Prestige jazz funk than Blue Note — the kind of rough-edged and spontaneous vibe that Rusty Bryant, Leon Spencer, and others cooked up during the early 70s on some of their best classics for that label — but Green’s a perfect person to catch the spirit of that wildfire, and jams long and nicely here on 8 tracks that include “Farid”, “Jan Jan”, “One More Chance”, “Patches”, “I Am Somebody”, “More Today Than Yesterday”, “Bottom Of The Barrel”, and “Walk On By”.
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For much more by Grant Green, see the stellar and truly flabbergasting labor of love that is the Blaxploitation Jive website for a Grant Green discography here

VA – Nigerian Disco Funk Special: The Sound of the Underground Lagos Dancefloor 1974-79 (2008)

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While not as compelling as the 2-disc “Nigeria Special” collection, this is a righteous set of songs in its own right. There are actually some weaker cuts on this one, especially for those whose tastes run like Clint Striker who said “I’m not really into all that wah-wah guitar stuff.” Maybe the problem is that the collection kicks off with its strongest cut, “Take Your Soul” (1976) from The Sahara All Stars of Jos.” The momentum of the rest of the album just never quite reaches those heights again. Tracks like the seriously-flanged “Lagos City” (1976) from Asiko Rock Group, and the closer, Afro-beatish “Love Affair” (1976) by SJOB Movement, keep the stew simmering. “Greetings” (1978) from Joni Hastruup — which manages to be both the most melodic cut here and also one of the funkiest, with some tight riffing on sax, flute, and Rhodes that match Joni’s stident voice. — keep it interesting in between some of the more monochromatic jams here. It’s probably my favorite track on this compilation. The sound quality varies between the tracks here, no doubt due to most if not all of these tracks being sourced from vinyl, but if you are seeking stuff like this out then you probably won’t care much about that. If this doesn’t quite reach the same level as Soundway’s other Nigerian compilations, its only because they set such a high benchmark with them.

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From CD Universe
Nigerian music is known for its polyglot character, a fact that is exemplified by its native juju and highlife–a perfect storm of indigenous music traditions bolstered by Western technology. Lesser-known are Nigerian attempts to adopt Western trends wholesale, as with the exquisitely rare disco and funk groups compiled for NIGERIA DISCO FUNK SPECIAL: THE SOUND OF THE UNDERGROUND LAGOS DANCEFLOOR 1974-1979. Taking obvious cues from stateside horn-driven funk ensembles like B.T. Express, Ohio Players and the J.B.’s, the propulsive dancefloor beats are punctuated by horn blasts and the scratchy, repetitive insistence of rhythm guitars–a sound with distinctive echoes of the ringing melodicism of highlife guitar sections. Highlights on this funky slice of Afro-disco include: Asikos’s “Lagos City,” an energetic blast of African brass, and Dr. Adolf Ahanotu’s “Ijere,” a slick, overdriven funk number done in a distinctly Nigerian style.

Nigerian musicians adopt ’70s funk and disco in this collection of rarities.Uncut (p.103) – 4 stars out of 5 — “The Afrobeat thunder is still strong on NIGERIA DISCO FUNK SPECIAL….T-Fire could be the Lagos branch of Clinton’s P-Funk family.”

Track Listing

1. Take Your Soul – The Sahara All Stars
2. Will of the People – T-Fire
3. Lagos City – Asiko Rock Group
4. Greetings – Johnny Haastrup
5. You’ve Gotta Help Yourself – The Groovies/Bongos Ikwue
6. Some More – Jay U Experience
7. Mota Ginya – Voices of Darkness
8. Ijere – Dr. Adolf Aonotu
9. Love Affair – S-Job Movement

 in 320kbs

 in FLAC LOSSLESS AUDIO FORMAT

Toni Tornado – B.R. 3 (1971)

toni tornado

Toni Tornado
B.R.3
Released 1971 on Odeon
2002 reissue, Odeon Cem Anos

Another great album from Toni Tornado, the “James Brown of Brazil.” But first off — here is the deal with this CD pressing: There is a really annoying defect on the first track, Juizo Final (*not* the Nelson Cavaquinho song, by the way), where it skips obnoxiously within the first ten seconds. This is not a problem with the individual disc or the rip. How do I know this?? I bought two of them… Same exact skip in the same exact place on both of them.

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On the whole the album is less funky than his 1972 album that would follow this but it is no less soulful for it. The repetoire seems him giving soulful treatments to two Roberto Carlos / Erasmo Carlos compositions (Não lhe quero mais, and Papai, não foi esse o mundo que você valou); a song by Hyldon (O repórter informou) and of course the title track that was a big hit (penned by Antônio Adolfo and Tibério Gaspar). This song would gain awards at the annual Festival of Song, in 1970, after which his career took off. The title, B.R.3, besides referring to the highway that connects Rio to Belo Horizonte, is also street slang for an intravenous injection… Giving the refraine “A gente corre, a gente morre, na B.R.3” a different shade of meaning.

The heavy influence of American black music was truly revolutionary, but also very “foreign” for Brazil, leading to some amusing parodies on TV that Toni himself participated in, on the show Os Trapalhões. These clips give you the idea, no portuguese necessary

And this one, of horrible VHS quality but even more silly, performing B.R.3. Filmed around the time of this record, this one pokes fun at the Toni’s rather idiosyncratic way of dancing while singing the tune at this point in history, sort of an odd power-walk/march. Note all the wigs of cabelo “Black Power”….

Short bio of Tony Tornado from allbrazilianmusic. com , a site from UOL that I actually forgot existed!! I could have been saving myself time on translations lately!

Born in São Paulo, Antônio Viana Gomes moved to Rio at age 11, after his father died. He worked as a shoeshine boy and sold candy until turning 18 and joining the Army (as a parachutist). He initiated his career as a rock’n’roll singer, using the stage name Tony Checker. Then, he joined the music & dance group Brasiliana and toured the world for the next ten years. He lived in New York for 3 years, and there he met Tim Maia. He was arrested in Brazil, once, accused of reproducing the Black Panthers compliment. Back in Brazil, he continued as a crooner, being eventually discovered by songwriter Tibério Gaspar. Tibério and Antônio Adolfo chose Tornado to interpret their songs, “BR-3” at a very important music festival in 1970, and the success was overwhelming. Another huge hit was “Podes Crer, Amizade”. He also developed his acting career, mainly in the 80s and 90s.

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VA – Getting Off: The Seductive Sounds of 70's Adult Cinema (2007)

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I am away from the command center at the Den of Iniquity but the blog cannot stay quiet, so I bring you a post from our contributor KUNG. Rip, scan, and description are all his.

01. L. Hurdle & F. Ricotti – Move On
02. Anton Scott – J.P. Walk (Boogie Nights)
03. Alan Tew – Gentle In The Night
04. Ray Davies – Power Play
05. Unknown – Nude interlude #1 (Kinky Ladies of Bourbon Street)
06. Alan Hawkshaw – Hawkind and fire
07. Brian Bennett – Disco Fever
08. Roger Webb & Keith Grant – The Bends
09. Alan Tew – The Heist
10. Unknown – Nude interlude #2 (Downstairs, Upstairs)
11. Unknown – Carl’s cabana (Inside Seka)
12. Unknown – Fernando’s blues (Come Under My Spell)
13. Unknown – Nude interlude #3 (Do You Wanna Be Loved?)
14. Unknown – Bang ’em hard (Inside Seka)

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Moviegrooves.com wrote: The Seductive Sounds of 70s Adult Cinema is another porno music compilation – but with a difference; the emphasis is definitely on creating an atmosphere by using the music, with almost no dialogue/moaning/groaning as is the usual deal with porno music comps.

On closer inspection, Getting Off: The Seductive Sounds of 70s Adult Cinema is actually a compilation of genuine (licensed) 70s library music mixed with some music (lifted from DVD) from actual 70s and early 80s porno movies (hey – we did our research, so you don’t have to!), with the library music here having every chance of actually being used in adult movies back in the day.

Whatever – with Getting Off: The Seductive Sounds of 70s Adult Cinema, the guys at Lucky Monkey Records have put together a great little compilation that definitely evokes that sexy 70s porno movie sound! Now where did we put that double-ended dildo?

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Library music is a term that refers to music that is done by commercial studio musicians and then sold to be used in commercials, b-movies, tv-series etc.

DESCRIPTION BY KUNG:

So today I will share one album from my Porn Groove collection. So, you wonder – why would anybody collect Porn music. Well a couple of years ago dear wifey opened by “accident” my forbidden cupboard and discovered my collection of XXX films. Again and again I tried explaining to her that I enjoy these films only because of the fabulous music in them. So why dont you buy the f@#$%^ CDs instead, she cried. My honest reply was: Its impossible! You must understand they dont release this music on CDs. You gotta get the DVDs. Oh well, I was wrong… And now I have to keep buying these CDs only to prove my love for the music. I will never admit anything else! My whole life is a lie…

VA – GETTING OFF in 320 kbs

VA – GETTING OFF in FLAC Lossless

Blackbyrds – The Blackbyrds / Flying Start (1973/74) 320kbs and FLAC

Thanks to KUNG for this rip of these wonderful two albums issued together. No time for the type of review this deserves, not this week, but you can read the back cover. I’ve just been enjoying this too much lately to keep all the fun to myself. ENJOY! And thanks again Kung!

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Blackbyrds (1973) and Flying Start (1974) at 320kbs

in FLAC…