Lonnie Liston Smith and The Cosmic Echoes – Cosmic Funk (1974)

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Lonnie Liston Smith & The Cosmic Echoes
“Cosmic Funk”
Released 1974

Flying Dutchman Records (BDL 1-0591)

1 Cosmic Funk Smith 5:39
2 Footprints Shorter 6:11
3 Beautiful Woman Smith 6:58
4 Sais (Egypt) Mtume 8:16
5 Peaceful Ones Smith 5:03
6 Naima Coltrane 4:01

Produced by Bob Thiele
Engineered by Bob Simpson

Electric bass – Al Anderson
Congas, Percussion – Lawrence Killian
Drums – Art Gore
Percussion – Andrew Cyrille , Doug Hammond , Ron Bridgewater
Acoustic and electric pianos, percussion – Lonnie Liston Smith
Soprano saxaphone, Flute, Percussion – George Barron
Vocals, Piano, Flute – Donald Smith

You will have to escuse me if I don’t give this album the presentation and descrption it really deserves. I have wanted to post about here for a long, long time. But for anyone else who is celebrating Christmas alone, as I currently am, I feel an urgent impulse to put this album out there. While all of Lonnie Liston Smith’s records with the Cosmic Echoes may have carried more or less the same variations of messages about peace and love, nothing comes close to the eruption of the first cut off this one that gave the album its name, which introduces Lonnie’s brother Donald Smith on vocals

CITIZENS OF THE WORLD
IT’S TIIIIIIIIIIIIIIIME for WORLD PEACE!

followed by a long hair-raising scream to let you know he really means this.

This song is one of the heaviest slabs of spiritual/soul jazz funkiness out there. The track, along with much of the rest of the album, combines creative use of electronics in some seriously psychedelic flourishes along with free and post-bop jazz explorations. While his next album, “Expansions”, may get the lion’s share of attention for this former Pharoah Sanders sideman, I find this album to be every bit its equal and in fact I seem to come back to it more often. Beyond the first cut, the rest of the album is a real treat too, with first-rate original compositions along inspired readings of Wayne Shorter’s “Footprints” and, unafraid of taking the risk, a vocal version of Coltrane’s “Naima.”

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in 320kbs em pee tre

in FLAC LOSSLESS AUDIO

not sure if there is a password on this one… but I don`t think so

Betty Davis – Is It Love or Desire? (1976)


Release Date: Oct 6, 2009
Recording Date: 1976
Label: Light In The Attic

I have been sitting on this one for a while, waiting until I had something “profound” to say about it. Since that day seems to be adrift in the unforeseeable future, I thought it would just post about it and let you, the listener, decide what is or what is not profound about the “lost album” from Betty Davis. Without doubt, it deserved to be released and not confined to a record companies vault for thirty years (there were never even any bootleg copies that made it out). This is the last stand for Betty Davis and her backing band Funk House. Recorded in the middle of a swamp in Louisiana, the wonderful liner notes narrate the whole story about the making of the record. In the eyes of the musicians involved (although not necessarily in Betty’s judgment, for the careful reader) this was the best album they made and the most creative thing they’d ever been involved with. Some of the critics, like the hacks at AMG, have been agreeing with their promo kits, *cough*, I mean independently-thought-out music reviews…

I am still listening to this album and sizing it up but for me, it is not as good as “They Say I’m Different”, which I think will always reign as Betty at her best for my money. But that isn’t to say this is a disappointment by any means. It just lacks something of the excitement and energy found on her first three albums. I find some of the lyrics a bit dubious, and not in the good way of her first two albums, but I don’t want to piss on anybody’s parade who is rightfully excited to get their hands on an album that has been wondered about for years. And if the wonderful Light In The Attic label had not reissued her earlier albums, sparking a revival of interest in Betty Davis, this one may never have seen the light of day.

Betty Davis – Is It Love Or Desire? (1976) in 320kbs em pee thwee

Betty Davis – Is It Love Or Desire? (1976)in FLAC Lossless Audio

Selda Bagcan – Vurulduk Ey Halkim Unutma Bizi (1976)

selda
selda

Review of the original album:

Vurulduk Ey Halkim Unutma Bizi
(Turkuola 305) 1976

A. 1. Vurulduk Ey Halkim Unutma Bizi 2. Utan Utan 3. Karaoglan 4. Aciyi Bal Eyledik 5. Askerin Turkusu 6. Maden Dagi
B. 1. Maden Iscileri 2. Gardasim Hasso 3. Bundan Sonra 4. Gozden Gezden 5. Arpaciktan 6. Ecoya Donder Beni 8. Zamani Geldi


A very good folk album with some nice folkrock tracks, for progressive music lovers especially is “Utan,Utan” (in a more prog folk way with some fuzz) & “Karaoglan”. “Askerin Türküsü” is also interesting for its “mediaeval” arrangements. “Maden Dagi” is also very beautifully, very emotionally sung. A protest album forbidden at those days, so hard to find. It is however the same as the vol 3 CD (or “Türkülerimiz 3”), with again other order in tracks. Her singing is beautiful. (The photoraph you see here was also included on Türkülerimiz 3).

Bio found on the interwebs:

Selda Bağcan or Selda, was born in Muğla, Turkey in 1948, is a well renowned Turkish folk music singer, composer and politic activist.

She has been one of the most effective names in Turkish Folk and Folk Rock music for years. Her protest style and leftist, socialist political views both in lyrical and activist means brought her a great support from the public yet caused many troubles with the military and governmental authorities. Selda Bağcan’s lyrics demonstrate a political struggle as well as the problems and demands of working class and the public. Her satirical lyrics make critical references to contemporary politicians from both left and right-wings yet mostly criticizes the right-wing governments and imperialism.

She both composed her own songs and covered Turkish Folk songs. Bağcan’s covers involves the usage of western instruments like acoustic guitar as well as traditional ones like saz or bağlama. Her modern and universal style in covering the traditional folk songs, involving a wide variety of musical styles from progressive and psych rock to traditional folk catches the attention of many music lovers who are into different genres of music. And because of her powerful and emotional voice, she is known as (and she calls herself) bitter sound of Turkish people.

Biography

She has started his musical career when she was a student at Ankara University, Faculty of Sciences, Department of Engineering Physics. The first two singles had sold around one million and following this success she somehow had to choose music as a profession. She had gave concerts in many countries including Germany, Netherlands, France, England, Belgium, Denmark, Sweden, Norway, Switzerland, and Australia. Also attended to the Golden Orpheus 1972 representing Turkey with the request of Turkey Ministry of Foreign Affairs. She mainly performed on activities mainly organized by left wing foundations and initiatives. In 1973, for the first time she toured the Western Europe.

After the 1980 Turkish coup d’état, her activities were limited by the military junta and she had been arrested and jailed three times between 1981 and 1984. She couldn’t attend to The WOMAD (Word of Music and Dance) Foundation Festival 1986, which was supported by Peter Gabriel, just because her passport had been seized. But the festival committee decided to add one of her songs to the official record of the festival. This record has helped her to receive many international invitations for festivals around the world. With the hard efforts of the WOMAD Foundation, the government returned Bağcan’s passport in 1987. At the same year, she attended Rotterdam Art Festival (June 13), WOMAD and Glastonbury Festival (June 19), Jubile Gardens (June 20), Eurls Court (June 25), Capital Radio Festival (June 26). After her Western Europe tour in 1988, she gave local public concerts during 1989 and 1990. These concerts were free and hundreds thousands of people were gathered.

In year 1990, she was invited to Netherland by Rasa Organization (Interkultureel Centrum) and gave public concerts in Utrech, Jmegen, Tilburg cities and later on in Prizren ve Pristina, Yugoslavia. She also traveled to Israel and Denmark for concerts and festivals, at the same year.

In 1992, she recorded the film musics for Kurşun Adres Sormaz.

She lives in İstanbul and runs her own business under the name Majör Müzik Yapım (Majör Music Production)
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Singles

* Katip Arzuhalim Yaz Yare Böyle/Mapusanede Mermerden Direk, 1971
* Tatlı Dillim Güler Yüzlüm/Mapusanelere Güneş Doğmuyor, 1971
* Çemberimde Gül Oya/Toprak Olunca, 1971
* Adaletin Bu Mu Dünya/Dane Dane Benleri, 1971
* Seher Vakti/Uzun İnce Bir Yoldayım, 1971
* Yalan Dünya/Kalenin Dibinde, 1972
* Eyvah Gönül Sana Eyvah/Zalim Sevgililer Bu Sözüm Size, 1972
* Bölemedim Felek İle Kozumu/Bülbül, 1973
* Gesi Bağları/Altın Kafes, 1973
* Nem Kaldı/Rabbim Neydim Ne Oldum, 1974
* Aşkın Bir Ateş/O Günler, 1974
* Anayasso/Bad-ı Sabah, 1974
* Dostum Dostum/Yuh Yuh, 1975
* Kaldı Kaldı Dünya/İzin İze Benzemiyor, 1975
* Görüş Günü/Şaka Maka, 1976
* Almanya Acı Vatan/Kıymayın Efendiler, 1976
* Aldırma Gönül Aldırma/Suç Bizim, 1976
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Albums

* Türkülerimiz 1, 1974 (reissued in 1995)
* Türkülerimiz 2, 1975 (reissued in 1996)
o See also: Selda (Album), 2006
* Türkülerimiz 3, 1976 (reissued in 1998)
* Türkülerimiz 4, 1977 (reissued in 1999)
* Türkülerimiz 5, 1978 (reissued in 2001)
* Türkülerimiz 6, 1979 (reissued in 2006)
* Türkülerimiz 7, 1980
* Türkülerimiz 8, 1982
* Türkülerimiz 9, 1983
* Türkülerimiz 10, 1985
* Dost Merhaba, 1986
* Yürüyorum Dikenlerin Üstünde, 1987
* Özgürlük ve Demokrasiyi Çizmek, 1988
* Felek Beni Adım Adım Kovaladı, 1989
* Anadolu Konserleri: Müzikteki 20 Yılım, 1990 (Live)
* Ziller ve İpler – Akdeniz Şarkıları 1, 1992
* Uğur’lar Olsun, 1993
* Koçero, 1994 (With Ahmet Kaya)
* Çifte Çiftetelli – Akdeniz Şarkıları 2, 1997
* Ben Geldim, 2002
* Denizlerin Dalgasıyım Ben, Halkımın Kavgasıyım, Yarınların Sevdasıyım… Ben Ölmedim ki!, 2004
* Güvercinleri de Vururlar, 2008

SELDA on the web:
Progressive Homestead site
Finder’s Keepers page on Selda

This is not nearly as funky as the album from 1975 reissued on Finders Keepers, but its a damn cool slab of psychedelic tinged folk-rock. Plenty of vibe to go around here. Selda has received a bit of attention with a surge of interest in Turkish rock, psychedelia, and funky beats, the “Anatolian invasion” among record collectors. This album, reissued by the sketchy ‘World Psychedelia’ label in Korea deserves a good listen. The liner notes are badly translated and not terribly informative. There is a full set of lyrics, however, for those who can read them. Selda’s songs really make me wish I knew what the hell she was singing about.

in 320kbs

 FLAC LOSSLESS

Ananda Shankar and His Music (1975)

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Ananda Shankar
“Ananda Shankar and his Music”
Released 1975
CD- Fass Records, Spain

WIKI PEDIA ARTICLE

Ananda Shankar (11 December 1942 – 26 March 1999) was an Bengali musician best known for fusing Western and Eastern musical styles. He was married to Tanushree Shankar.
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Early life

Ananda Shankar

Born in Almora in Uttar Pradesh, India, Shankar was the son of Amala and Uday Shankar, popular dancers, and also the nephew of renowned sitarist Pandit Ravi Shankar. Ananda did not learn sitar from his uncle but studied instead with Dr. Lalmani Misra in Varanasi.

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Professional career

In the late 1960s Shankar travelled to Los Angeles, where he played with many contemporary musicians including Jimi Hendrix. There he was signed to Reprise Records and released his first self-titled album in 1970, featuring original Indian classical material alongside sitar-based cover versions of popular hits such as The Rolling Stones’ “Jumpin’ Jack Flash” and “[[The Doors]’ “Light My Fire”. This album has become an enduring cult classic.[citation needed]

Returning to India in the early 1970s Shankar continued to experiment musically and in 1975 released his most critically acclaimed album, Ananda Shankar And His Music, a jazz-funk mix of Eastern sitar, Western rock guitar, tabla and mridangam, drums and Moog synthesizers. Out of print for many years, Ananda Shankar And His Music was re-released on CD in 2005.

After working in India during the late 1970s and 1980s, Shankar’s profile in the West began to rise again in the mid-1990s as his music found its way into club DJ sets, particularly in London. His music was brought to a wider audience with the release of Blue Note Records’ popular 1996 rare groove compilation album, Blue Juice Vol. 1., featuring the two standout tracks from Ananda Shankar And His Music, “Dancing Drums” and “Streets Of Calcutta”.

In the late 1990s Shankar worked and toured in the United Kingdom with London DJ State of Bengal and others, a collaboration that would result in the Walking On album, featuring Shankar’s trademark sitar soundscapes mixed with breakbeat and hip hop. Walking On was released in 2000 after Shankar’s sudden death from heart failure the year before.

In 2005, his song Raghupati was used on the Grand Theft Auto: Liberty City Stories soundtrack, and in 2008 his song Dancing Drums was used on the LittleBigPlanet soundtrack.
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Discography

* Ananda Shankar, 1970 (LP, Reprise 6398)
* Ananda Shankar, 1970 (CD, Collectors’ Choice CCM-545)
* Ananda Shankar And His Music, 1975 (EMI India)
* Missing You, 1977 (EMI India)
* A Musical Discovery of India, 1978 (EMI India)
* Sa-Re-Ga Machan, 1981 (EMI India)
* 2001, 1984 (EMI India)
* Ananda, 1999 (EMI India)
* Arpan, 2000 (EMI India)
* Walking On, 2000 (Real World 48118-2, with State of Bengal)
* Ananda Shankar: A Life in Music – The Best of the EMI Years, 2005 (Times Square TSQ-CD-9052)
* Ananda Shankar: Shubh- The Auspicious, 1995
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Grand Theft Auto:Liberty City Stories

His singing voice is heard in the game Grand Theft Auto:Liberty City Stories in the radio station Radio del Mundo. The song he’s singing there is Raghupati

Holy smokes is this album a delight for the ears! Fans of trippy rock, funk, weird film scores, Bollywood grooves from the 70s, and anyone else with the least bit of musical eclecticism should flock to Ananda Shankar like geese in the springtime! Tunes range from blissed-out funk that makes you want to paint your skin and go-go, to the delicate and gorgeous (“Vidai (Parting)” and the epic-length “Dawn”). The CD is taken from a vinyl copy and there is some surface noise in places, but this quickly becomes unnoticeable to me as the sound is full and rich.

As described by a friend: “The opener The Street of Calcutta Rocks your butt a big time but the very next one i.e. Cyrus mends your heart. ” Nicely put.
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Dusty Groove description / review:

One of the greatest albums ever by one of the most compelling figures in Indian music! Ananda Shankar’s been chronicled elsewhere and often on these pages — so by this point, you probably already know that he’s a renegade pioneer who combined funky grooves with sitars and tablas, forging a whole new sound in Indian music that’s still having quite a bit of influence today. This 1975 album is a stunner — way more open-minded than his other album for Reprise (which we’ve also got on reissue!), with tracks that push the funky groove a lot farther than you’d expect, swirling percussion, organ, guitar, tablas, moog, and sitar all together into an unbelievable sound that will leave you breathless! Titles include “Dancing Drums”, “Streets Of Calcutta”, “Back Home”, “Renunciation”, “Dawn”, and “The Lonely Rider”.
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Includes artwork at 600 dpi, log, cue, m3u, and a free sandwich.

Ananda Shankar and His Music (1975) in 320kbs

Ananda Shankar and His Music (1975) in FLAC LOSSLESS

Eugene McDaniels – Headless Heroes of the Apocalypse (1971) VBR

No time for a personalized review today but this one has been in the cue for a while and its about time I shared it. Heavenly and heavily minor-key dissonant cluster chord funk soul-jazz with bitingly droll lyrics, how can you go wrong? this It’s a lot of fun, you shouldn’t miss this! I would upload my vinyl copy of the follow up, ‘Outlaw’ but I have no time for a vinyl rip for the next… few years or so. Anyone who wants to contribute it, leave a message.

Song sample — SUPERMARKET BLUES
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EUGENE MCDANIELS
Headless Heroes of the Apocalypse
Released 1971 on Atlantic Records


(Wikipedia entry!)

Headless Heroes of the Apocalypse is an album of American soul music by artist Eugene McDaniels.

As with McDaniel’s previous album, this is not a typical Soul album, which can even be seen by the cover image (a picture of McDaniels screaming between two warring samurai).

This album dabbles in form between soul, Funk, jazz and even folk. In addition, it has been a collector’s item among rap music and rare groove enthusiasts since the early 90s when several of the songs were sampled by many hip hop producers including Pete Rock and Q-Tip.

Track listing

1. “The Lord is Back” – 3:19
2. “Jagger the Dagger” – 6:02
3. “Lovin’ Man” – 4:47
4. “Headless Heroes” – 3:32
5. “Susan Jane” – 2:10
6. “Freedom Death Dance” – 4:16
7. “Supermarket Blues” – 4:08
8. “The Parasite (For Buffy)” – 9:36

Personnel

* Harry Whitaker – piano
* Gary King – electric bass
* Miroslav vitous – acoustic bass
* Alphonse Mouzon – drums
* Richie Resnikoff – guitar
* Carla Cargill – female vocals

Review by John Duffy

When Headless Heroes of the Apocalypse was first released in 1971, so the legend goes, Spiro Agnew himself called Atlantic Records to complain about the album’s incendiary lyrics. Promotional efforts dried up, and since then, the album has become one of the great rare gems of the funk era. With this first-ever CD release from Label M, it is available again in all its strange, eclectic glory. McDaniels had earned his living as a producer and songwriter for artists like Roberta Flack and Gladys Knight, and was in all honesty not much of a singer, but somehow his clumsy lyrics and dry delivery combined to carry his message across. In an unthreatening manner that hardly warranted a call from the White House, McDaniels warns that man’s struggles against each other are pointless, as some dark sinister force controls us all (“Headless Heroes”), and that protest without action is futile (“no amount of dancing is going to make us free,” he sings in “Freedom Death Dance”). With a dry wit he recounts an episode of everyday racist brutality in “Supermarket Blues,” and finds simple carnal pleasures in the acoustic folk-flavored “Susan Jane.” It all gets wrapped up in an appealing stew that draws from rock, funk, folk, soul, and even free jazz. Considering the number of times McDaniels’ sinewy beats and chunky guitar riffs have been sampled over the years, it’s about time a proper re-release allowed listeners to hear the whole picture.

Bo Diddley – The Black Gladiator (1970) Japanese press

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It’s never too late to commemorate the passing of the great Bo Diddley earlier this year. And what better choice than this little-known piece of fuzzed-out gutter funk, “The Black Gladiator.” OK, now the first thing you’re thinking is, “What’s going on with this cover art?” Don’t ask me. Maybe Bo (and not Hendrix, or Miles Davis) was actually the subject of Betty Davis’ infamous tune, “He Was A Big Freak.” But we’re not interested in fogging the memory of the renowned Mr. Diddley here, no sir. Maybe he’s just a gladiator, in addition to being a gunslinger and other occupations, and I’m reading too much into that. I am notoriously guilty of over-interpretation. This record speaks for itself. Is this a desperate attempt for an artist fifteen years into his career to “keep up with the times,” to ‘update’ his sound? Maybe. Do I care? Not really. Recasting his thang in a new musical landscape of black pride and consciousness, of psychedelic funk, does not bother me one wit. And the music is unmistakably Bo Diddley. One thing about the early 1970s, for me the apex of quality of all recorded music in every imaginable genre around the world (I’m not kidding folks.. I will take this claim to my grave and wager money on it) is that keeping up with the times wasn’t such a bad thing. The sounds of the decade age well — if they didn’t, why are the beats, textures, and tones from the 70s continually recycled, resampled, and reinvented, every decade hence? @#$% the 80’s revival. I’m staying in 1975 with my Curtis Mayfield records and this copy of The Black Gladiator. From a Japanese limited edition pressing with LP-sleeve artwork dupes. Enjoy! (My apologies for the misogyny of “Shut Up, Woman.” I tried selling Mr. Diddley on a song titled “Bo Diddley is a Radical Feminist Deconstructionist” but he refused to record it.)

P.S. Some people really hate this record. They loath it alongside Muddy Water’s “Electric Mud,” which I also like. Different strokes.

Bo Diddley – The Black Gladiator (1970) Aqui!!

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An “obituary” of sorts that circulated on a email listserv I belong to, upon news of his passing.

“No, goddammit, no. That grouchy genius can’t be dead. He was a
fucking Gunslinger. He fought monsters. He was loose, he was a surfer, he was
a man, he was a lumberjack, he would not be accused, he was looking for a
woman, he could bounce, he could twist, he was cookie-headed, he was powered by
heart-o-matic love, he was bad, he did the crawdaddy, he let them
bring it to Jerome, he shot tombstone bullets, he wore a fucking cobra snake
around his neck, he had a rock and roll nurse who gave him pills, he stopped
mumbling and talked out loud, he was my dearest rock and roll darling.

He was a lot of things, goddammit, but he can’t be dead. There’s no
fucking “Bo Diddley’s Dead” in his catalog.”