Reposts – Sept 26, 2013

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From top left to bottom right:

 Antonio Adolfo e Brazuca (1970)
João Nogueira (1972)
Paulo Moura – Fibra (1971)
Ray Barretto – Indestructable (1973)
Bobby Hutcherson – Now! (1969) 
Alaíde Costa – Canta Suavamente (1960)

Some reups for all of you while I am busy with other things.  Please report any erroneous links you come across, cheers.

VA – O Fino da Bossa (1964) (Alaíde Costa, Jorge Ben, Nara Leão, Zimbo Trio, Oscar Castro Neves, Wanda Sá)

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“O Fino da Bossa”
O show “O Fino da Bossa” recorded at the Paramount Theatre in São Paulo, 25th of May, 1964.
Original LP produced by Walter Silva
CD repressing on RGE 1994
featuring:
Alaide Costa
Zimbo Trio
Rosinha de Valenca
Ana Lucia
Paulinho Nogueira
Jorge Ben
Wanda Sá
Nara Leao
Oscar Castro Neves
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Some interesting photos included in the packaging, which feature a young Flora Purim and Toquinho, neither of whom seemingly participated in the recording, but they sure do look pretty
01 – Onde Está Você (Oscar Castro Neves / Luvercy Fiorini) – Alaíde Costa
02 – Garota de Ipanema (Tom Jobim / Vinicius de Moraes) – Zimbo Trio
03 – Samba Medley | Gosto Que Me Enrosco (J. B. da Silva “Sinhô”) Agora É Cinza (Alcebíades Barcelos “Bide” / Armando “Marçal”) Duas Contas (Garoto) Bossa na Praia (Pery Ribeiro / Geraldo Cunha) – Paulinho Nogueira
04 – Tem Dó (Baden Powell / Vinicius de Moraes) – Ana Lúcia
05 – Consolação (Baden Powell / Vinicius de Moraes) – Rosinha de Valença
06 – Chove Chuva (Jorge Ben “Jorge Benjor”) – Jorge Ben
07 – Desafinado (Tom Jobim / Newton Mendonça) – Wanda Sá
08 – Maria Moita (Carlos Lyra / Vinicius de Moraes) – Nara Leão
09 – Berimbau (Baden Powell / Vinicius de Moraes) – Oscar Castro Neves
As the liner notes explain, this concert was recorded less than two months after the military coup that plunged the country into twenty-plus years of repression and censorship. Brazil already having undergone its share of rapid power shifts across the first half of the twentieth century, a lot of people still thought (or hoped) it was a temporary state of affairs. (Actually the generals who took over the country promised to hold elections after they had the situation ‘under control’, which of course never happened except in the most artificial of ways years later). It is surprising to read in these notes how this show was not only sold out but — being that the Paramount only held about 2000 people or so — that people were breaking the glass in doors and windows to force their way in! ! Anyway, the music here is excellent and has some real rarities. Alaíde Costa, still the most underrated of the bossa nova chanteuses, opens the recorded set. Zimbo Trio, led by bassist Luiz Chaves, run through a ripping version of ‘A Garota de Ipanema’ that makes me forget how tired I am of hearing that song — I could be mistaken but I believe that they were the first bossa-jazz trio to play an instrumental version of the tune… Paulinho Nogueira provides a solo acoustic guitar medley of tunes that probably goes on for too long. I have a couple of Nogueira’s albums on vinyl and I like him well enough, they are enjoyable, but he often comes across as a diluted and derivative version of Baden Powell or sometimes João Gilberto (when he sang) combined, without the inspiration or innovation of either of those two. He did however bring a different type of finger-picking style to the way he played samba that is different from Baden.
A nice thing about this record is that we get some of the less famous bossa nova singers who haven’t been canonized into musical sainthood like their brethren, names like Ana Lúcia, Rosinha da Valença, and Wanda, whose records can be hard to track down. Jorge Ben’s live version of “Chove Chuva” is slower and more jazzed-out than the album version, and its quite a treat given how early in his career this is. Note that this track was NOT included in the 2-CD set of rarities that was part of the boxset ‘Salve, Jorge!’ from 2009. Nara Leão is amazing as always singing Maria Moita, and the sound quality on this track is amazing. In fact the whole record sounds great but this one stands out for some reason. The album closes with ten minutes of Oscar Castro Neves’ group giving a majestic treatment of “Berimbau” that includes a full orchestral arrangement in the middle. Too bad all the musicians are uncredited, especially since the guitar sounds.. familiar. Almost like it might be Baden Powell. Who played on a lot of albums uncredited. Hmmm…

Read the commentaries for the keys to your dreams. Feel free to leave them too, it is what keeps bloggers blogging

Alaide Costa – Canta Suavamente (1960)

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“On Alaíde Costa’s second LP, the singer loaned her suave voice to the masters of bossa nova, a movement that was still establishing itself in that year of 1960. People like Roberto Menescal, Ronaldo Bôscoli, Carlos Lyra, Sérgio Ricardo, Chico Feitoso, alongside – of course – Tom Jobim and his partners Newton Mendonça and Aloysio de Oliveira. What is interesting is that Alaíde’s interpretations mixed the delicacy of her timbre with the intensity of someone who grew up hearing the samba-canções and boleros on the radio waves of the 1950s. On this CD, she sings some of the first versions of “Discussão,” “Chora Tua Tristeza” and “Fim de Noite”
– Rodrigo Faour, back cover of the reissue

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ALAÍDE CANTA SUAVEMENTE
1960 RCA Victor (BBL 1062)

This is Alaíde Costa’s second long-player record. Her first album was largely put together at the instigation of João Gilberto, who saw in her a perfect vehicle for the emergent bossa nova movement. Previously she had recorded a few 78’s including the tune ‘Tarde Demais’ ((Hélio Costa/Anita Andrade), and Gilberto heard something special that he felt he had to tap into. It is not hard to imagine why. Unlike Elizete Cardoso, whose career was already well-established when she first cut her version of ‘Chega de Saudades’, here was a brand new talent whose musical identity had yet to be ossified into one genre or another. Moreover, unlike Cardoso’s brash, powerful voice, Alaíde Costa had a lightness and subtlety that must have seemed to João’s ears as tailor-made for the new music they were creating. The first album she made for RCA, ‘Gosta de Voce’ (1959) featured tunes from Gilberto, Carlos Lyra,Bôscoli, Tom & Vinicius, and also classics from Dolores Duran and other ancestors. This second album was even more a full-fledged Bossa Nova album (in capital letters) and among its highlights are lovely versions of Jobim’s “Esquecendo Você” and the often-recorded “Dindi” and Carlos Lyra’s “Ciúme.” As Rodrigo Faour notes in the reissue jacket (translated above) this album also debuted some classics of bossa nova like “Discusão” and “Fim da Noite” the former a partnership between Jobim and the short-lived Newton Mendonça.

It is a bit baffling to me that Alaíde Costa’s legacy and importance to bossa nova is not as celebrated as it ought to be. To some extent it may have something to do with her having to drop out of music for nearly quite a few years in the late sixties and early seventies due to health problems — She suffered some extensive hearing damage and loss when she attended a Who concert in São Paulo in 1968 and was positioned right in front of Pete Townsend’s amplifier when he began smashing his guitar.

Alaíde Costa – Coração (1976)

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Produced by Milton Nascimento and Mariozinho Rocha

Arrangements – Joao Donato

Joao Donato (piano)
Novelli (bass)
Robertinho Silva (drums)
Nelson Angelo (guitars)
Toninho Horta (electric guitar)
Ivan Lins (piano on track Corpos)
Joao Donato, Beto Guedes, Novelli, Nelson Angelo and Fernando Leporace (backing vocals)

01 – Pai Grande (Milton Nascimento)
02 – O Samba Que Eu Lhe Fiz (Sueli Costa)
03 – Coração (Nelson Ângelo / Ronaldo Bastos)
04 – Catavento (Milton Nascimento)
05 – Quem Sou Eu (Johnny Alf)
06 – Sonho e Fantasia (João Donato / Lysias Ênio)
07 – Corpos (Ivan Lins / Vitor Martins)
08 – Pé Sem Cabeça (Danilo Caymmi / Ana Borba)
09 – Tomara (Novelli / Paulo César Pinheiro / Maurício Tapajós)
10 – Viver de Amor (Toninho Horta / Ronaldo Bastos)
11 – Tempo Calado (Alaíde Costa / Paulo Alberto Ventura)
12 – O Que Se Sabe de Cor (Fernando Leporace)

Another fine album from Alaide Costa, this time with Milton Nascimento producing and the one and only João Donato on keys and arrangements. It’s a fine record, but Milton’s production is a bit on the slick side and, in my opinion, sometimes heavy-handed. Milton was well on the road to international respect as a Brazilian jazz-pop-fusion star, but this record sees him still clinging to some of the charms of the Clube da Esquina period. A bunch of the players from that Minas Gerais scene are here, and the repetoire includes songs penned by Toninho Horta, Nelson Angelo, Ronaldo Bastos, and of course Milton. The first song is from the latter’s 1970 album, where it received a much more psychedelic performance, and frankly this one leaves me cold but I suppose Milton wanted to make sure we knew he was producing this. But lest we forget of Alaíde’s bossa nova roots, we move right along with “O Samba Que Eu Lhe Fiz” and soon after, the highlight of this album for me — her version of Johnny Alf’s “Quem Sou Eu.” Other standout tracks are Danilo Caymi / Ana Borba’s “Pem Se Cabeça,” and “Viver de Amor” from Horta & Bastos, both songs bringing a bossa-informed MPB sound that suits Alaíde’s style quite nicely. The closer, “O Que Se Sabe De Cor,” is everything that makes Alaíde will leave you, well, wanting more as the alternate title says. The orchestration from Donato is very good throughout, helping keep things interesting in a set of songs that tend to stay around the same mid-tempo pace.

Alaide Costa – Afinal (1963) 320kbs

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Alaide Costa – Afinal (1963) 320 kbs
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SONG SAMPLE

Insensatez (Jobim, Vinicius de Moraes)

A insensatez que você fez
Coração mais sem cuidado
Fez chorar de dor
O seu amor
Um amor tão delicado
Ah, porque você foi fraco assim
Assim tão desalmado
Ah, meu coração quem nunca amou
Não merece ser amado

Vai meu coração ouve a razão
Usa só sinceridade
Quem semeia vento, diz a razão
Colhe sempre tempestade
Vai, meu coração pede perdão
Perdão apaixonado
Vai porque quem não
Pede perdão
Não é nunca perdoado
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This is a marvelous record from start to finish. It is nice of RGE to feature the original album cover art, but it would be much nicer if they could reproduce it in a way that was legible. Lots of liner notes that look interesting as well as complete lyrics. The players (I had to squint much to get this, so please appreciate!):
Piano – César
Guitar – Theo
Bass – Naba
Drums – Hamilton
Vocal chorus on track 2 and — Trio Seleno
Arrangements – Gaya

I was never on a first-name basis with these chaps but apparently the Brazilian listening public of 1963 was.. Or maybe not. Either way there is excellent playing throughout, very sensitive to the dynamics of Alaide’s voice. There are also uncredited musicians on here, playing xylophone, sax, trombone, flute and probably a few other instruments I am forgetting. I hope you enjoy this as much as I have, it has brightened my days of late. It is truly beautiful.

1. Afinal
2. E Agora?
3. Natureza
4. Cadê O Amor
5. Ouvi Tua Voz
6. Igrejinha
7. Insensatez
8. Estorinha
9. Tristeza De Amar
10. Manhã Chegou
11. Rimas De Ninguém
12. Como Eu Gosto De Você