Baden Powell – Ao Vivo no Teatro Santa Isabel (1966)


Baden Powell
Ao Vivo no Teatro Santa Rosa
1966
Elenco ME-30
Reissue 2009 on Biscoito Fino

1. Abertura (Berimbau)
– Choro para metronomo
2. Astronauta
3. Valsa de Euridice
4. Preludio em re menor
5. Berimbau
6. Consolacao
7. Lamento *
8. Samba de uma nota so
9. Tempo feliz **

Group:
Musicians: Baden Powell (git, vcl **)
Carlinhos (b)
Oscar Castro Neves (p)
Victor Manga (dr)
unknown strings and flute *
unknown chorus **

Guitar Model: Author 3 by luthier Reinaldo DiGiorgio
Also published as: Samba de uma nota so (CD, 1999)
O Mestre do Violao Brasileiro (CD-Box, 2003)
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I am really liking this Baden Powell live record! Kudos to the almost-indie label Biscoito Fino for bringing it back into circulation with the reissue, although I am not totally in love with the mastering job. The artwork is a little on the sparse side too for a full-price release, basically just reproducing the info on the original back cover. But its the music that counts and this is a wonderful and (until now) rather rare album to come across. Includes Baden playing some Bach (Prelúdio em Ré Menor) and also a tune Vinicius co-wrote with Pixinguinha (Lamento). The rest of the tunes are all compositions by Baden and/or Vinicius, a lot of ‘afro-sambas.’

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From a cool German website I found called Brazil-On-Guitar:

BrazilOnGuitar says: Unfortunately, we did not find out the exact recording date of this first live record by BP. The half-hour recording in the Teatro Santa Rosa is another proof of his guitar abilities in 1966 and stands for his intense playing style. The sound quality of the recording is not the best and could not be improved significantly with the 2003 cd re-issue. However, BP’s guitar playing is so precise and exciting that the sound can be overlooked.

The recordings give the impression of a creative and very vital musician, whose life is completely devoted to music. At this time BP had developed great musicality and an impressive technique. It seems that on Teatro Santa Rosa he wanted to set other standards. In his high tempi there could be missed the depth and relaxation of later years, which is understandable thinking of his playing speed.

On 20 live recordings, five from the sixties, we can study his art of the moment. Teatro Santa Rosa is different with its repertoire and unique recordings. There is the impressive interpretation of the choro with a metronome and the overwhelming Bach prelude. His arrangements of the Afro-Sambas are wild, his Euridice sensitive. His virtuoso arrangement of Samba de uma nota so is very own and tricky. He would as well play it as an encore at the Berlin Jazzfestival in 1967. The record closes with Tempo feliz, his first recording as a singer……

…..We thank Robert G. (Germany) for his translation

Baden Powell – Swings with Jimmy Pratt (1963)

“Baden Powell Swings with Jimmy Pratt”
Elenco ME-4, 1963

Musicians: Baden Powell (git)
Jorge “Jorginho” Ferreira da Silva, Copinha (fl)
Moacir Santos (sax, vcl)
Sandoval (cl)
Sergio Barroso (b)
Jimmy Pratt (dr)
Rubem Bassini (perc)
unknown piano playerProduction: Aloysio de Oliveira
Direction: Jimmy Pratt
Production Manager: Peter Keller
Studio: Philips of Brasil
Sound Engineer: Norman Sternberg
Recording Technician: Celio Martins
Cover Layout: Cesar G. Villela
Photos: Francisco Pereira

Guitar Model: Author 3 by luthier Reinaldo DiGiorgio

Also issued as: Developments (LP, 1970)
O Mestre do Violao Brasileiro (CD-Box, 2003)

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Flabbergasted Vinyl Transfer Specs:

Original Elenco (ME-4) pressing -> Pro-Ject RM-5SE turntable / Sumiko Blue Point 2 cartridge / Pro-Ject Speedbox power supply -> Creek OBH-18 MM Phono Preamp -> M-Audio Audiophile 2496 soundcard. Recorded at 24-bit / 96 khz resolution to Audacity. Click Repair on very light settings to remove some clicks and popsm, some manual click removal using Audition. Track splitting in Adobe Audition 3.0. Dithered to 16-bit using iZotope M-Bit noise-shaping. Converted to FLAC and mp3 using DbPoweramp. ID tags done with Foobar2000.

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I don’t know anything about Jimmy Pratt other than he plays the skins on a whole bunch of jazz records from the 40s and 50s, having done sessions with Charlie Parker, Stan Getz, Zoot Sims, Oscar Pettiford, Bud Shank, and Anita O’Day. Busy guy. But this record may be one of the most famous he played on. Partly because he essentially receives co-billing on the marquee with Baden. But also he was, in a way, in the right place at the right time to really connect with the Bossa Nova explosion.

From the back cover:

“When the drummer Jimmy Pratt was in Brazil accompanying Caterina Valente, he heard Baden play guitar like everyone that was exposed to Baden’s art, he was profoundly enthusiastic. The enthusiasm provoked the idea for this recording. And from the recording was also born a friendship and mutual admiration between the two artists. ‘Baden Powell Swings with Jimmy Pratt’ is a tribute from Baden to his friend and American colleague.” – Aloysio de Oliveira

The observent among might notice Mr. Pratt apparently did not make the photo session for the album or else closely guards his image against potential feitiço and witchcraft.. He is absent from the shots taken in the recording studio, unless we are looking at the back of his head in the shot where Vinicius de Moraes appears for no particular reason — it’s an instrumental record bereft of his lovely lyrics, he didn’t play anything, and he only has a writing credit on the very first tune, ‘Deve Ser Amor.’ Anyway, I find it amusing.

In the photo to the right of this we see Baden playing into a Neumann U-87 microphone, and looking like he wants to walk into the control room and slap somebody. I’m not sure why because it’s a great-sounding recording.

Fantastic playing from everyone involved, including Moacir Santos who contributes his own compositions, Coisas No.1 and Coisas No.2. It`s the clarinet, however, that really slays me on this record: while doing the vinyl transfer and processing, I swear I listened to Coisas No.1 about ten times in a row at one point. When you hear it you will know why. There is nothing groovier on earth.

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Baden Powell – Canta Vinicius de Moraes e Paulo Cesar Pinheiro (1977)

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Baden Powell – Canta Vinicus De Moraes e Paolo Cesar Pinheiro

01. Labareda [0:04:48.77]
02. Linda Baiana [0:02:49.18]
03. Cavalo Marinho [0:04:00.20]
04. Samba De Bencao [0:09:02.65]
05. E de lei [0:04:21.06]
06. Cancioneiro [0:03:43.76]
07. Figa de guine [0:03:40.61]
08. Falei e Disse [0:03:10.36]
09. Bezouro manganga [0:03:01.98]

AMG Rating: 4 Stars
Release Date: Feb 21, 2006
Recording Date: Apr 1977
Label: Universal

Andre Arpino – Drums
Raymond Guiot – Flute
Raymond Katarzynski – Trombone
Sam Kelly – Percussion
Nilton Marcelino – Percussion
Baden Powell – Guitar, Vocals
Luigi Trussardi – Bass
Vilson Vasconcelos – Percussion


Review by Thom Jurek
Only 38-minutes long, Canta Vinicius De Moraes e Paolo Cesar Pinheiro is one of the truly great Baden Powell recordings. Long before alcoholism took its toll on the great guitarist and composer, he recorded this set in 1977 for the Festival label at the behest (read: strongarm tactics) of Jacques Lubin, his A&R man at Barclay, as a tribute to the two great lyricists and collaborations in his life. This CD issue was released by the jazz label Sunnyside, and licensed from Universal International. Powell is supported on this program buy a small group of truly sympathetic studio musicians who held him in awe. His small, tender, but deeply moving voice on such classics as “Labaréda,” and “Samba de Bênção” — both of which are based on the chants, rhythms, and melodies of the Afro-Brazilian Candoble religion — that holds the magic. On the gorgeous and dreamy “Cavalo Marinho,” in which Raymond Guiot’s flute gently invokes the lyric of “Fly Me to the Moon,” from Powell’s melody in the intro, Powell’s voice gently swoons, as if singing to a lover in the wee hours of morning. There is a sadness in it too; one that holds its place even in the most expressively romantic passages. All of these were written with Vinicius De Moraes, a man far more educated and cultured in the European sense; he was also from a wealthy class and was economically secure. It was the deep knowledge of Brazilian song and rhythmic traditions that Powell brought to his poetic lyrics and which made the tunes they wrote together work so well. The lyrics written by Paulo César Pinheiro are less elegant, but more directly expressively “folk.” They have an authority about them in that they speak from the working classes and to them. Check the wild and celebratory “É de Lei,” or the taut, seductive carnival march of “Cancioneiro,” and the slow, steamy “Faleie Disse,” where the ache in Powell’s voice tells you everything you need to know about the lyrics. This is a wonderful album by Powell, one of his very best, recorded at an artistic peak. That it is available at all in America is a wonder. It should not be missed.

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Baden Powell – Le Monde Musical de Baden Powell (1964) {REPOST}

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Deve Ser Amor – 3:54
Choro Para Metronome – 3:00
Adágio – 3:07
Berimbau – 3:03
Samba Em Prelúdio – 3:30
Chanson D’hiver – 2:27
Samba Triste – 3:33
Berceuse A Jussara – 2:37
Prelude – 2:54
Euridice – 3:05
Bachiana – 4:10
Garota De Ipanema – 2:59

AMG Rating: 3 Stars
Release Date: 2005
Recording Date: 1964
Label: Universal Music France

Baden Powell (git)
Alphonse Masselier (b)
Arthur Motta (dr)
Silvio Silveira (perc)
Paul Mauriat and his orchestra
Francoise Waleh (vcl on “Samba Em Preludio”)

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1964 cover

Linernotes wrote:
Brazilian music is, as its country which is 16 times as big as France, diverse, varied, surprising, subtle and simple all at the same time. This music only asks, as Brazil, for regognition and love. With this album, which is the first he releases in Europe, the guitarist & composer BP presents us a complete palette of his musical world. From African rythms to his personal perceiving of classical european composers, and through delicate reminiscence of melodies from the Antilles, to negro american jazz accents: BP reminds all these influences on his guitar.

He’s 27 years old. Born in Rio. He played since 8 y.o. After having studied in Rio academy, where he improved his style and learned composition, he started like many other, in clubs with little rythmic entities. He eventually showed up in several Tv & radio broadcasts, and his compositions became very popular. He teamed with Tom Jobim, Carlos Lyra, Roberto Menescal for work and tours in several big cities in Brazil. He recorded with Herbie Mann and Jimmy Pratt just before his departure to the US. After some concerts in the Village Vanguard, his friend and poet Vinicius de Moraes made him come to Paris in the late of 63. He gave recitals and tv shows: Living room, musicorama etc… Asked for his guitaristic influences he answers: Segovia, Van Eps, Django are people that are part of the musical world i love. With this record you’ll be able to discover samples from this musical universe.

Here are the themes: DEVE SER AMOR: was recorded using play back device. Baden first recorded the rythmic part with the bass & drums. Afterwards he recorded the melody. The same process was involved with BACHIANA.
CHORO PARA METRONOME is quite a challenge. The choro which was originally an improvisation over folkoric patterns, turns here into a guitar piece. The metronome replaces the whole rythm section. Fitting perfectly with this souless rythm, BP shows here its astounding technique.

The Albinoni ADAGIO and the Bach PRELUDE so seduced the guitarist, that he did want to give a respectful homage to these composers by playing these two pieces.
BERIMBAU is the name of a musical instrument looking like an arc, which is used in the Capoeira. This is a dance which partly look like wrestle, and is done by Nordeste youth, especially in the Bahia area. It is undoubtly of African inspiration.

SAMBA EM PRELUDIO is made of two distincts melodies. Baden plays the first which is in turn played by the orchestra. Then the guitar plays the second theme, and then the two parts are played together, and taken by cello and Francoise Waleh’s voice. CHANSON D’HIVER is the first song that Baden wrote when he came to Paris in December 63.

SAMBA TRISTE opens on a very dark climate and dramatic first part, then the repetitive rythm takes over and leads to the conclusive chords. BERCEUSE A JUSSARA is a delicate composition, dedicated to his little niece “Sobrinha” Jussara. EURIDICE is a Vinicius de Moraes composition, which illustrates the Orphee myth. BACHIANA is a piece written with, once again, Johann S. Bach in mind. GAROTA is a new composition from Tom Jobim and Vinicius. Baden takes it as a basis for a free improvisation, with a complete command on the instrument.
Jacques Lubin, 1964.

Scott Yanow, AMG wrote:
When it was originally released in 1964, this set of music was a bit of a hit, selling over 100,000 copies. Brazilian guitarist-composer Baden Powell was working regularly in France at the time and he is joined on various selections by a French rhythm section and an orchestra. There are also some unaccompanied guitar solos. Listened to over four decades later, much of the music comes across as being overly sweet, safe and sleepy. Powell plays well enough, but the lack of mood variation and the unimaginative arrangements are unfortunate. Since the guitarist rarely gets beyond the melody, the overall results are pleasant background music, nice but predictable. [Universal reissued Le Monde Musical de Baden Powell on CD in 2005.]