João Gilberto – João Gilberto (1961) Vinyl Rip 24bit-96khz

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JOÃO GILBERTO
1961 Odeon (MFOB 3202)

1 Samba da minha terra
(Dorival Caymmi)
2 O barquinho
(Roberto Menescal, Ronaldo Bôscoli)
3 Bolinha de papel
(Geraldo Pereira)
4 Saudade da Bahia
(Dorival Caymmi)
5 A primeira vez
(Marçal, Bide)
6 O amor em paz
(Tom Jobim, Vinicius de Moraes)
7 Você e eu
(Carlos Lyra, Vinicius de Moraes)
8 Trem de Ferro-Trenzinho
(Lauro Maia)
9 Coisa mais linda
(Carlos Lyra, Vinicius de Moraes)
10 Presente de natal
(Nelcy Noronha)
11 Insensatez
(Tom Jobim, Vinicius de Moraes)
12 Este seu olhar
(Tom Jobim)

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Vinyl First Pressing -> Pro-Ject RM-5SE turntable (with Sumiko Blue Point 2 cartridge, Speedbox power supply) > Creek Audio OBH-15 -> M-Audio Audiophile 2496 Soundcard -> Adobe Audition 3.0 at 24-bits 96khz -> Click Repair light settings, additional clicks and pops removed in Audition -> dithered and resampled using iZotope RX Advanced -> ID Tags done in foobar2000 v.1.0.1 and Tag & Rename. No EQ or compression or nuthin.

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Flabbergast’s review:
Every song a symphony in two minutes.

Features arrangements from Antonio Carlos Jobim and the Walter Wanderley Trio on accompaniment.

Everything on this classic album is classic. At the time an innovator of almost unimaginable proportions, today’s João Gilberto’s work is classic. And all the classic songs written by classic composers are interpreted, with class, on this classic early entry in the catalog of João’s classic discography.

It is filled with genius staples in the ‘bossa nova canon’ – “O barquinho”, “Você e eu,” and “Insensatez” for example, which have all been recorded numerous times by numerous people in numerously worthwhile interpretations. But one of João Gilberto’s shamanic skills was taking a tune like Caymmi’s “Samba da minha terra” and transforming it while retaining its essence like an alchemist distilling a musical elixir of eternal youth. Plus, he sings the line “chicken din, chk nndong n a din, ch dongdongdong ch diiiiing, ch dondong ch ch ding ch ch don don don” in it.
Which reminds me, I have to remark one of his other remarkable talents, his onomatopoetic skills evident on songs like “Trem de Ferro-Trenzinho”… Who else can do that and not sound silly? Or better yet, who else can do that and stay in time with his complex syncopation? The album closes with one of my favorite Jobim compositions “Este seu olhar”, a true gem of lovelorn melancholic transcendence. Off the top of my head I can’t think of anybody else who recorded this (I’m sure I’m wrong) but it doesn’t matter – there is no surpassing the master’s masterful mastery of this one.

About the only tune I find a little tedious is ‘Presente de natal’ that manages to combine a love song and a Christmas song in what is a bit of an overdose of glucose for me. Small quibble about a masterful album from a master. But I have to feign a critical ear, right?

I hope you all enjoy this vinyl rip. It is from a first pressing vinyl copy from an album that is HALF A CENTURY OLD so of course there is some surface noise. But I find it quite nice. The second side of the album has more distortions than the first, for whatever reason. Perhaps some day I will score another copy and do a combined-rip super-upload.
Lest I forget, I was planning this post a long while back to celebrate João’s 80th birthday. Then I sort of forgot it was upon us. So, this is a day late, but I have a feeling we will be celebrating him for a while this year still!

in 320 kbs 
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16bit-44.1khz FLAC
    (Mirror)

24bit-96khz FLAC LOSSLESS

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HAPPY 80th BIRTHDAY, João Gilberto, born June 10, 1931

password / senha / shamanic chant in the comments

Toquinho e Vinicius – O Poeta e o Violão (1975)

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O POETA E O VIOLÃO (1975)
TOQUINHO E VINICIUS
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RGE (303.0032)

1 Tristeza
(Haroldo Lobo, Niltinho)
2 Marcha da quarta-feira de cinzas
(Carlos Lyra, Vinicius de Moraes)
3 Morena flor
(Toquinho, Vinicius de Moraes)
4 Chega de saudade
(Tom Jobim, Vinicius de Moraes)
5 Dora
(Dorival Caymmi)
6 Canto de Ossanha
(Baden Powell, Vinicius de Moraes)
7 Rosa desfolhada
(Toquinho, Vinicius de Moraes)
8 Berimbau
(Baden Powell, Vinicius de Moraes)
Consolação (Baden Powell-Vinicius de Moraes)
9 Januária
(Chico Buarque)
10 Insensatez
(Tom Jobim, Vinicius de Moraes)
11 Apelo
(Baden Powell, Vinicius de Moraes)
12 Garota de Ipanema
(Tom Jobim, Vinicius de Moraes)
13 O velho e a flor
(Bacalov, Toquinho, Vinicius de Moraes)
14 Nature Boy
(Eden, Ahbez)

Toquinho (Antônio Pecci Filho) – guitar and vocal
Vinicius de Moraes – vocal

Luis Enríquez Bacalov – piano on “O velho e a flor”

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TRANSCRIPTION INFO

Vinyl -> Pro-Ject RM-5SE turntable (with Sumiko Blue Point 2 cartridge, Speedbox power supply) > Creek Audio OBH-15 -> M-Audio Audiophile 2496 Soundcard -> Adobe Audition 3.0 at 24-bits 96khz -> Click Repair light settings, additional clicks and pops removed in Audition -> dithered and resampled using iZotope RX Advanced -> ID Tags done in foobar2000 v.1.0.1 and Tag & Rename. No EQ or compression.

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It’s a simple enough idea, and it works beautifully. Take these two masters, these two entities incorporating the bohemian culmination of seventeen years of the bossa nova lifestyle known as Vinicius and Toquinho, and put them in a room with nothing but a guitar and some microphones and have them play for four hours. This album plays like we are listening in on a rehearsal or a casual backstage jam session with all the tunes spun off the cuff, but if you listen carefully the sheen of spontaneity dims a little as you realize there is no way that these two — especially the old lush, Vinicius – could have nailed all these tracks so angelically in one take. On their earliest collaborations, Toquinho and Vinicius didn’t always sound this confident in their vocals and often brought in one or another chanteuse to fill the spotlight (Maria Bethania, Maria Cruesa, Miucha). The tracklist is a leisurely stroll through the bossa nova songbook, and the in-between song banter makes it sound like they are deciding on the repetoire right there on the spot. But, again, I ain’t buying it. The song choices, sequence, and arrangments are just too damn perfect – but this is a compliment and not a complaint. The only slightly false step is `Chega de saudade`, to which they add a whole lot of nothing special. Among the other song interpretations that do NOT have the name of Vinicius in the credits, is a respectable version of Chico Buarque’s “Januária”, jazz standard, Nat King Cole hit and touchstone of the bossa nova crowd “Nature Boy,” and a tune from Caymmi, “Dora.” The latter is one of Dorival Caymmi’s rare compositions that is *not* about Bahia but instead is an homage to the city of Recife. The remainder of the tunes dip into all of Vinicius’ famous writing partnerships – Tom Jobim, Carlos Lyra, and especiallY Baden Powell. Toquinho’s guitar playing may not have had the mercurial energy and vision of Powell, but he has a great sense of dynamics and a lovely voice that blends excellently with Vinicius, giving an urgency and excitement to ‘Canto de Ossanha” and “Berimbau” that do justice to everyone involved, and in the case of “Apelo” make the song particularly suited to the style of this duo.

It pays to remember that in 1975, there were not yet thousands of coffee shops, restaurants, airports and the like with some poor sap paid to sit on a stool plunking away at “Garota de Ipanema.” I sometimes feel empathy for these poor souls, unless they have decided to accompany themselves with a drum machine or sequencer, in which case I silently curse them and all of their offspring for seven generations. But I digress. Even without the official designation of this song to background restaurant dinner music (which, in fact, most likely had already occurred by 1975), there is just not a lot of room to make this song terribly interesting beyond the first, initial burst of recordings by singers and jazz-bossa combos. But Toquinho and Vinicius manage to give it a bit of a nudge back into relevance and remind us that we are, after all, listening to masters of the genre. Last but not least, the songs that Toquinho and Vinicius actually composed together are likely to lose place to their more famous brethren on this record, and there are only three selections out of fourteen songs represented here. But those three demonstrate that not only could they hold their own in the company of ‘the classics’ but that their partnership was really onto something during the first half of the 1970s. “Morena flor” featuring heavily their interwoven vocal harmonies; “Rosa desfolhada” is more of a solo vehicle for Toquinho and had heavy overtones of Chico; the penultimate track on the album “O velho e a flor” is one of the most interesting, as it also features Argentinian composer and arranger Luis Bacalov on the piano. (The casual between song banter becomes rather tongue-in-cheek here as Bacalov just *happens* to be hanging around the studio, and with a piano, to help them out…)

This album was recorded in Milan, Italy. As per the back cover:
“This album was recorded in 4 hours of studio time in Milan with the special participation of mestres Bacalov and Bardotti, in a climate of total distraction.”

 24bit

Alaide Costa – Canta Suavamente (1960)

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“On Alaíde Costa’s second LP, the singer loaned her suave voice to the masters of bossa nova, a movement that was still establishing itself in that year of 1960. People like Roberto Menescal, Ronaldo Bôscoli, Carlos Lyra, Sérgio Ricardo, Chico Feitoso, alongside – of course – Tom Jobim and his partners Newton Mendonça and Aloysio de Oliveira. What is interesting is that Alaíde’s interpretations mixed the delicacy of her timbre with the intensity of someone who grew up hearing the samba-canções and boleros on the radio waves of the 1950s. On this CD, she sings some of the first versions of “Discussão,” “Chora Tua Tristeza” and “Fim de Noite”
– Rodrigo Faour, back cover of the reissue

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ALAÍDE CANTA SUAVEMENTE
1960 RCA Victor (BBL 1062)

This is Alaíde Costa’s second long-player record. Her first album was largely put together at the instigation of João Gilberto, who saw in her a perfect vehicle for the emergent bossa nova movement. Previously she had recorded a few 78’s including the tune ‘Tarde Demais’ ((Hélio Costa/Anita Andrade), and Gilberto heard something special that he felt he had to tap into. It is not hard to imagine why. Unlike Elizete Cardoso, whose career was already well-established when she first cut her version of ‘Chega de Saudades’, here was a brand new talent whose musical identity had yet to be ossified into one genre or another. Moreover, unlike Cardoso’s brash, powerful voice, Alaíde Costa had a lightness and subtlety that must have seemed to João’s ears as tailor-made for the new music they were creating. The first album she made for RCA, ‘Gosta de Voce’ (1959) featured tunes from Gilberto, Carlos Lyra,Bôscoli, Tom & Vinicius, and also classics from Dolores Duran and other ancestors. This second album was even more a full-fledged Bossa Nova album (in capital letters) and among its highlights are lovely versions of Jobim’s “Esquecendo Você” and the often-recorded “Dindi” and Carlos Lyra’s “Ciúme.” As Rodrigo Faour notes in the reissue jacket (translated above) this album also debuted some classics of bossa nova like “Discusão” and “Fim da Noite” the former a partnership between Jobim and the short-lived Newton Mendonça.

It is a bit baffling to me that Alaíde Costa’s legacy and importance to bossa nova is not as celebrated as it ought to be. To some extent it may have something to do with her having to drop out of music for nearly quite a few years in the late sixties and early seventies due to health problems — She suffered some extensive hearing damage and loss when she attended a Who concert in São Paulo in 1968 and was positioned right in front of Pete Townsend’s amplifier when he began smashing his guitar.

João Gilberto – João Gilberto (1973)

This is my favorite João Gilberto record, absolutely and without doubt. Not that I claim to have his entire discography (it is pretty massive), but this record simply cannot be surpassed. I had an old review I had written for this record in 2004 that I was going to post here, but it strikes me as a bit silly now so I’m including some commentary from others below. What I will say is that this record has an intimate ambiance unlike any other in my collection — It’s as if João Gilberto just came in off the street to play you a handful of songs in your own living room, and is doing it so quietly and gently so as not to wake up a sleeping child in the next room. He also brought along a percussionist who is crouched in a corner doing their thing as if balanced on eggshells the whole time. Anyone who has played music knows that it is much more challenging for a drummer or percussionist to play quietly than it is to play loudly, and this record seems to defy physics in that regard. This record does not just stand out in João’s body of work — it stands out as a pure artistic statement. (Also having been recorded in New Jersey by Wendy Carlos [see below] scores some weirdness points..)

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João Gilberto – (self-titled) 1973

Águas de Março
Undiú
Na Baixa do Sapateiro
Avarandado
Falsa Baiana
Eu Quero Um Samba
Eu Vim Da Bahia
Valsa (Como São Lindos Os Youguis)(Bebel)
É Preciso Perdoar
Izaura


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[quote]
from Richard Ginell, AMG:
This release is Joao Gilberto stripped down nearly to his bare essentials — his voice, guitar and the extremely spare drumming of Sonny Carr — and he’s just as mesmerizing as he’s ever been on records. The whole record is about the rhythmic clashes and dovetailings of a singer and his guitar, pitched at extremely low levels of volume yet generating volumes of drive without seeming to breathe hard. Dig the insistent way in which “Falsa Baiana” and Gilberto Gil’s marathon rhythm machine “Eu Vim Da Bahia” ride the waves of the bossa nova groove, or how Gilberto delivers one of the best renditions of Jobim’s “Aguas de Marco” — quietly relentless and to-the-point. Three of the tracks eschew words altogether — gentle syllables and/or Gilberto’s insistent guitar tell the entire story — and the final selection, “Izaura,” belatedly adds a female voice (Miucha) in the left speaker. Though recorded in a New Jersey studio — the engineer, surprisingly enough, is Wendy Carlos, the electronic music pioneer of Switched-On Bach fame — this addictive release originates from PolyGram Brazil.[/quote]

From the Slipcue E-zine:[quote]
Joao Gilberto “Joao Gilberto” (Polydor Brasil, 1973)
Joao’s “white album” — a hauntingly sparse, beautiful, and quite ethereal recording. One of the best Brazilian records ever made. Sparse and gentle, graceful beyond the reach of practically any other musician alive, this includes revamped acoustic takes on several bossa nova and pre-bossa oldies, along with newer material such as his lullaby for his young daughter, Bebel, and one song each by the upstart tropicalistas, Caetano Veloso and Gilberto Gil. Gilberto sings barely at a whisper, while his percussionist is the absolute model of restraint and economy. Next to his debut albums of the 1950s, this is probably the best work Gilberto ever did — and that’s saying a lot! HIGHLY recommended![/quote]