VA – Nigerian Disco Funk Special: The Sound of the Underground Lagos Dancefloor 1974-79 (2008)


While not as compelling as the 2-disc “Nigeria Special” collection, this is a righteous set of songs in its own right. There are actually some weaker cuts on this one, especially for those whose tastes run like Clint Striker who said “I’m not really into all that wah-wah guitar stuff.” Maybe the problem is that the collection kicks off with its strongest cut, “Take Your Soul” (1976) from The Sahara All Stars of Jos.” The momentum of the rest of the album just never quite reaches those heights again. Tracks like the seriously-flanged “Lagos City” (1976) from Asiko Rock Group, and the closer, Afro-beatish “Love Affair” (1976) by SJOB Movement, keep the stew simmering. “Greetings” (1978) from Joni Hastruup — which manages to be both the most melodic cut here and also one of the funkiest, with some tight riffing on sax, flute, and Rhodes that match Joni’s stident voice. — keep it interesting in between some of the more monochromatic jams here. It’s probably my favorite track on this compilation. The sound quality varies between the tracks here, no doubt due to most if not all of these tracks being sourced from vinyl, but if you are seeking stuff like this out then you probably won’t care much about that. If this doesn’t quite reach the same level as Soundway’s other Nigerian compilations, its only because they set such a high benchmark with them.


From CD Universe
Nigerian music is known for its polyglot character, a fact that is exemplified by its native juju and highlife–a perfect storm of indigenous music traditions bolstered by Western technology. Lesser-known are Nigerian attempts to adopt Western trends wholesale, as with the exquisitely rare disco and funk groups compiled for NIGERIA DISCO FUNK SPECIAL: THE SOUND OF THE UNDERGROUND LAGOS DANCEFLOOR 1974-1979. Taking obvious cues from stateside horn-driven funk ensembles like B.T. Express, Ohio Players and the J.B.’s, the propulsive dancefloor beats are punctuated by horn blasts and the scratchy, repetitive insistence of rhythm guitars–a sound with distinctive echoes of the ringing melodicism of highlife guitar sections. Highlights on this funky slice of Afro-disco include: Asikos’s “Lagos City,” an energetic blast of African brass, and Dr. Adolf Ahanotu’s “Ijere,” a slick, overdriven funk number done in a distinctly Nigerian style.

Nigerian musicians adopt ’70s funk and disco in this collection of rarities.Uncut (p.103) – 4 stars out of 5 — “The Afrobeat thunder is still strong on NIGERIA DISCO FUNK SPECIAL….T-Fire could be the Lagos branch of Clinton’s P-Funk family.”

Track Listing

1. Take Your Soul – The Sahara All Stars
2. Will of the People – T-Fire
3. Lagos City – Asiko Rock Group
4. Greetings – Johnny Haastrup
5. You’ve Gotta Help Yourself – The Groovies/Bongos Ikwue
6. Some More – Jay U Experience
7. Mota Ginya – Voices of Darkness
8. Ijere – Dr. Adolf Aonotu
9. Love Affair – S-Job Movement

 in 320kbs


Eddie Kendricks – The Hit Man (1975) 320kbs & FLAC vinyl rip


Eddie Kendricks has a magic wand, that moves at his command, and he wants to turn you on. Eddie Kendricks just wants to make you happy. He wants to take your frown and turn it upside down. Eddie Kendricks wants you not to be afraid to pleasure yourself. He wants you to get the cream off the top. He wants to hear your body talk. I think you see where Eddie Kendricks is coming from. He wants you to skip work today, and put on this record, and stay home with your lady or your man.

Until recently the last time I had listened to this album in its entirety was a little over six months ago, right before All Hallow´s Eve. And when that star-crossed day came around, I threw a huge party in an abandoned house, quite an event for the rather sleepy and dull city I was living in. The party was somewhat notorious, lasting until dawn. Talk of the town even. But nothing and nobody caught fire, except on the dance floor, and I think the person who fell down the stairs ended up okay.

I was stone cold sober all night but the evening is still a blur. Magick was afoot. We had a few DJs and a bunch of gear crammed into this empty space with paint all over the walls, off from the side room that had the full ceremonial workings for a black mass waiting to happen, and a skull-baby in a coffin-cradle resting in the bathroom. I didn’t get around to taking my turn at the tables until around 1 am.

I played the track “Happy.” It is one of the very distinct memories I have of the evening. The song just sends positive vibrations into the air of any space it is played, making all recipients lucky enough to be present… happy. Just damn happy. The dance floor moved to its mellow groove and I saw enough smiles to believe ever word Eddie whispered in my ear. The last time I fell in love (and this could be the last time, I don’t know) was because of that song, although I wouldn’t know that until later. The woman in question was there at that party, disguised as a burly man, and so officially meeting her didn’t quite count. But that was the beginning. And it was all Eddie Kendrick’s fault. His voice and vibe have the power to make total strangers fall in love from across a crowded room, and not even learn about it until a month or two later. He’s that good.

Damn you Eddie Kendricks.

Bass – James Jamerson
Congas – Eddie “Bongo” Brown
Drums – Earl Palmer , Ed Green* , Harvey Mason , James Gadson
Guitar – Jay Graydon , John McGhee* , Melvin “Wah-Wah” Ragin* , Ray Parker*
Keyboards – Harold Johnson , Leonard Caston
Percussion – Bobbye Hall , Gary Coleman , Gene Estes
Producer – Brian Holland (tracks: A3) , Frank Wilson (tracks: All except A3) , Leonard Caston (tracks: All except A3)

A1 If Anyone Can (3:22)
Written-By – Kathy Wakefield , Leonard Caston

A2 Happy (5:13)
Written-By – Kathy Wakefield , Leonard Caston

A3 Get The Cream Off The Top (3:04)
Written-By – Brian Holland , Eddie Holland*

A4 Body Talk (6:41)
Written-By – Frank Wilson , Kathy Wakefield

B1 Fortune Teller (3:32)
Written-By – Barrett Strong

B2 Skippin’ Work Today (4:35)
Written-By – J. Christopher Fox

B3 You Loved Me Then (2:30)
Written-By – Kathy Wakefield , Leonard Caston

B4 I’ve Got To Be (7:48)
Written-By – Kathy Wakefield , Leonard Caston

Not a bad song on this one. Except for Fortune Teller. That song is bad. But the rest of it is fantastic. The songwriters, especially Kathy Wakefield and Leonard Caston, really manage to provide a cohesive set of material that makes you forget that Eddie didn’t write anything on the record, it all suits his style so well. Filled with the tight hooks, arrangements, and musicianship you would only expect from Eddie in 1975, when he was really on a roll and could do no wrong.

mmmm links
Eddie Kendricks – The Hit Man (1975) 320kbs

Eddie Kendricks – The Hit Man (1975) FLAC

Caroline Crawford – Nice and Soulful (1979) 320 kbs

Caroline Crawford – Nice And Soulful (1979)
A stunning set of soul tunes from the lovely Caroline Crawford — produced by Bohannon, and some of his best work from the time! Caroline’s got a great style that moves past other club singers of the time — much more soulful and sophisticated than simple disco diva styles, drenched in a deeper soul sound that grounds the album nicely in a strong tradition of 70s soul. The production is tight, but unobtrusive — a bit like some of the best work that Barry White did with singers of a similar style — and the whole album sparkles with a freshness that will make you say “Hey, why I have I been missing this one all these years?” Titles include “The Strut”, “I’ll Be Here For You”, “Havin Fun”, “Facts Of Life”, and “Love Me Or Leave Me Alone”.

1. I’ll Be Here For You
2. Can’t Hold Me Back
3. Love Me Or Leave Me Alone
4. The Strut
5. The Facts Of Life
6. Havin’fun