Eumir Deodato – Percepção (1972)


PERCEPÇÃO
Eumir Deodato
1972 London/Odeon
LLB-1080

1 Dia de verão
(Eumir Deodato)
2 A grande caçada
(Eumir Deodato)
3 O sonho de Judy
(Eumir Deodato)
4 Adeus amigo
(Eumir Deodato)
5 Bebê
(Hermeto Pascoal)
6 Neve
(Eumir Deodato)
7 Barcarole
(Eumir Deodato)
8 Serendipity
(Eumir Deodato)

All compositions by Eumir Deodato except “Bebê” by Hermeto Pascoal.


An interesting and beautiful album from Deodato, very different from his funkier work from the same period. It´s extremely short — only 24 minutes — but its a very engaging listen, even as it can make good ‘background’ music for chilling out with a good book (as I found out recently), which can’t be said of his very lively funk interpretations of pieces like ‘Also Sprach Zarathurstra’. It’s dominated by lush orchestrations, most of the pieces being rather slow and often melancholic, with a few upbeat numbers (“A grande caçada”, The Great Hunt, and “Bebê”, written by Hermeto Pascoal). This might be one of his lesser-known albums but I think it is some of his best work. Unfortunately the musicians are uncredited on the sessions.

Eumir Deodato – Percepção (1972) in 320 kbs em pe three

Eumir Deodato – Percepção (1972) in FLAC LOSSLESS AUDIO  

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Jimmy Smith – Black Smith (1974)


Jimmy Smith
Black Smith
Pride Records PD 6011Ripped from a new reissue on Pride Records (Atlantic) only played once prior to transfer

1. Hang ‘Em High
2. I’m Gonna Love You Just a Little Bit More
3. Joy
4. Ooh Poo Pah Doo
5. Why Can’t We Live Together
6. Groovin’
7. Pipeline
8. Wildflower
9. Something You Got

Producer – Jerry Peters , Michael Viner
Cover painting by Klaus Voormann

I doubt Jimmy Smith was aiming for irony but this record is basically tailor-made to piss off the jazz purists. I know that’s like shooting fish in a barrel but he really tries on this one. There aren’t too many jazz organists who can, with aplomb and grace, mix up Western soundtrack music (“Hang ‘Em Hang”, which sort of makes sense being that Clint Eastwood is such a jazz fan), Barry White (“I’m Gonna Love You Just A Little Bit More”), Johann Sebastian Bach (“Joy”), surf rock (“Pipeline,” previously recorded by The Chantays and The Ventures), and The Young Rascals (“Groovin'”). But more surprising is the indisputable fact that he can pull it off, with no small credit going to arrangers Jerry Peters and Michael Viner, the later of whom must have had a big hand in the repertoire selection. The one song that falls flat here is Jessie Hill’s “Ooh Poo Pah Doh,” although I am biased because its a song that I just don’t like. It might have done better here if Smith had not made a stab at singing it — Hell, if I don’t like it when Tina Turner sang it, I’m not going to dig Jimmy Smith giving it a turn. I am guessing that the first mix of this tune probably used an arrangement like some of the other tracks here that have a few female vocalists singing only some parts from the choruses and leaving the rest instrumental; ‘Ooh Poo Pah Doh’, for all its New Orleans glory, just doesn’t have that much going on in it musically and so I can imagine Smith and company being frustrated at the mixing desk and decided to record a take or two of lead vocals for the entire song. Bad move.

I suppose another reason for jazz snobs to hate on this album would be the use of uncredited session musicians.

This may not be the landmark that ‘Root Down’ was a few years before it, but this is still a cool album, long-cherished by crate diggers and beat seekers.
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REVIEW FROM DUSTY GROOVE:
A record that’s way way different than the sound of Jimmy Smith Blue Note work — and a much-loved set by fans of 70s funk! Jimmy’s organ is still very strongly out front of the arrangements — but it’s soaring over the top of grooves done by Jerry Peters and Michael “Incredible Bongo Band” Viner — tracks that have a harder, hipper style than most of Smith’s other recordings from the time — in a groove that often comes close to the best blacksploitation soundtracks of the time! The drums are plenty heavy on many numbers here — kicking in a hard and heavy bottom that gives the record a few key breaks — and other numbers even use a bit of chorus vocals, but in a way that never overwhelms the tracks, just supports them with a nice righteous edge. Titles include the classic break version of “I’m Gonna Love You Just A Little More Babe”, plus “Something You Got”, “Wildflower”, “Hang Em High”, “Groovin”, “Pipeline”, “Why Can’t We Live Together”, and “Joy”.

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VINYL RIP specs. Ripped in December 2008 on the old rig ->
Music Hall MMF.5 Turntable with Goldring 1012GX cartridge, Gyger II diamond stylus, and MK II XLR Ringmat –> Projekt Speedbox II -> Parasound Z Phono Preamp -> Marantz PMD 661 digital recorder at 24/96khz. Declicked on very light settings with Click Repair -> DC Offset and track splitting in Adobe Audition 2.0

Dithering to 16-bit in Isotope Rx (I think! Honestly don’t recall). Converted to FLAC and mp3 with DbPoweramp

 

Donald Byrd – Ethiopian Knights (1972) SBM CD Pressing

This is not a repost. I got hold of a the Super Bit-Mapped (SBM) Remaster of this album from the late 90s and figured I would share it here. Probably not great propaganda for my own vinyl rips, because I think this remaster probably sounds better than my nth-generation Blue Note repressing. But don’t judge me — I have some tasty vinyl treats coming up soon that really do sound lovely! You can see the original description for this album here

Donald Byrd – Ethiopian Knights (1972) SBM REMASTER in 320kbs

Donald Byrd – Ethiopian Knights (1972) SBM REMASTER in FLAC LOSSLESS AUDIO

Tomasz Stanko, Michal Urbaniak, Zbigniew Seifert – We’ll Remember Komeda (1972)


Tomasz Stanko Piano, Trumpet
Zbigniew Seifert Violin, Sax (Alto)
Michal Urbaniak Violin, Sax (Soprano), Sax (Tenor), Violectra
Roman Dylag Bass
Peter Giger Drums
Armen Halburian Percussion
Urszula Dudziak Percussion Vocals
Attila Zoller Guitar

This is a tribute album for the jazz pianist and composer Krzysztof Komeda, who died far too young at age 38. Six compositions of his are performed and arranged by musicians who had all worked with him, the most famous of which by far is trumpeter Tomasz Stanko. It may be a testament to the prolific legacy of Komeda’s work that an album this incredible can remain largely unknown. It is one of those records that is both beautiful and terrifying at the same time. Terror, incidentally, is not really an accident here, as two of the compositions draw from his film work with Roman Polanski (“A Knife in the Water,” and “Rosemary’s Baby.”) Everyone is firing on all cylinders on this session and they sound very tuned-in to each other, but the vocalizations of Urszula Dudziak are particularly noteworthy for having given me goosebumps every time. The music is also recorded especially well, which is never a bad thing. This share is for my dear friend MC Aardvark, who is a big aficionado of Komeda but was not familiar with this album. He’s turned me on to a lot of good music over the years and it is one of my biggest pleasures in life to be able to return the favor whenever possible.

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Grant Green – Live at Club Mozambique (1971)

Only Idris Muhammad and Ronnie Foster are held over from the famous line-up “Alive!” record from the previous year, but this one is featuring Supreme Court Justice Clarence Thomas on sax, so how can you go wrong?! The absence of vibes and percussion means the band sheds a little texture, but the resulting lean sound is its own reward.Log, cue, m3u, artwork, and ham sandwich included!

 

Release Date Jul 18, 2006
Studio/Live Studio
Mono/Stereo Stereo
Producer Francis WolffAlign Center
Engineer Ed Greene
Personnel Ronnie Foster – organ
Grant Green – guitar
Idris Muhammad – drums
Houston Person – tenor saxophone
Clarence Thomas – sopranino saxophone, tenor saxophonePersonnel: Grant Green (guitar); Clarence Thomas (sopranino saxophone, tenor saxophone); Houston Person (tenor saxophone); Ronnie Foster (organ); Idris Muhammad (drums).Mojo (Publisher) (p.127) – 4 stars out of 5 — “Guitarist and band deliver a bonanza of funk-fuelled jazz grooves.”—————————————————————————-
By Norman Weinstein at allaboutjazz dot comThis is some apotheosis of both jazz-funk and Grant Green, just when you thought Blue Note was practicing overexposure by adding yet another Green disk to last year’s three discs worth of funky compilations. But this live session, which spent 35 years in the vault, transcends all previous Grant Green funk sessions by a mile.

A lot of the credit has to go to the pluperfect chemistry of the band. Green may have been Blue Note’s most erratic artist of the ’60s and ’70s, but the key to his best work involved matching him with a drummer who kept him steady and on-task. Art Blakey did this for the bop-flavored Green, and Idris Muhammad did it during his funk period. Muhammad enlivened a lot of other Green sessions, though, so part of the magic of this gem needs to be explained by the fiery tenor saxophonist Houston Person and the totally obscure but piercing soprano saxophonist Clarence Thomas, perhaps woodshedding to get through law school (just kidding).

The eight tunes are nothing special, often one or two-chord pieces that the band dances around with uncanny creativity. “Walk On By” seems an odd tune in this context, but maybe the lyrics touched some sappy sentimentality in Green’s heart. No matter. The musicians ruthlessly rip into it until they sound like a house band at a fundraiser for the ’71 Oakland, California Black Panthers. The crowd, however, sounds comatose, which is perhaps a plus, since a rowdy, drunk audience might have interfered with hearing the tasty licks.

The title of the final track sums up Grant Green’s career as well as this generously programmed 76-minute funk fest: “I Am Somebody.” I think it took Green a lot of years to figure out the somebody he was. This recording is evidence that at the end of his life, he did find his truest musical identity. He was a fierce funk improviser, and no studio session caught the fire—but this live session does.
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From Dusty Groove

A rare funky treasure — lost live material from Grant Green’s hippest years at Blue Note — presented here for the first time ever ! The set’s an incredibly smoking one — with loads of long tracks that really stretch out in a hard-hitting, bottom-heavy funky mode — no surprise, considering that Idris Muhammad’s on drums, as part of a lineup that also includes Ronnie Foster, Houston Person, and Clarence Thomas! The groove here is a bit more Prestige jazz funk than Blue Note — the kind of rough-edged and spontaneous vibe that Rusty Bryant, Leon Spencer, and others cooked up during the early 70s on some of their best classics for that label — but Green’s a perfect person to catch the spirit of that wildfire, and jams long and nicely here on 8 tracks that include “Farid”, “Jan Jan”, “One More Chance”, “Patches”, “I Am Somebody”, “More Today Than Yesterday”, “Bottom Of The Barrel”, and “Walk On By”.
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For much more by Grant Green, see the stellar and truly flabbergasting labor of love that is the Blaxploitation Jive website for a Grant Green discography here

Leny Andrade – Estamos Aí (1965)

Happy Birthday to Flabbergasted Vibes! We are 1 years old!!

 

 

Leny Andrade
“Estamos Aí”
Released 1965 on CID/ODEONProduced by Milton Miranda
Orchestral arrangements by Eumir Deodato1-Estamos aí
(Regina Werneck – Maurício Einhorn – Durval Ferreira)
2-A resposta
(Paulo Sergio Valle – Marcos Valle)
3-Pot-pourri:
• Deixa o morro cantar
(Tito Madi)
• O morro não tem vez
(Tom Jobim-Vinicius de Moraes)
• Opinião
(Zé Keti)
• Enquanto a tristeza não vem
(Sergio Ricardo)
• Reza
(Edu Lobo-Ruy Guerra)
4-Clichê
(Maurício Einhorn – Durval Ferreira)
5-Olhando o mar
(Ronaldo Soares – Arthur Verocai)
6-Banzo
(Odilon Olyntho – Marcos Valle)
7-Samba de rei
(Pingarilho – Marcos de Vasconcellos)
8-Tema feliz
(Regina Werneck – Durval Ferreira)
9-Razão de viver
(Paulo Sergio Valle – Eumir Deodato)
10-Esqueça não
(Tito Madi)
11-Samba em Paris
(Nelsinho)
12-Coisa nuvem
(Roberto Nascimento – Victor Freire)

Recorded when she was only 22 years old, this record is what one might call a “powerhouse.” Not only is she performing compositions by a stable-full of the great songwriters of bossa nova — Tito Madi, Marcos Valle, Jobim & Vinicius, Edu Lobo / Ruy Guerra, Zé Keti, and the still under-appreciated Arthur Verocai — she is also one of the most energetic and sophisticated vocalists of the genre. In particular she brings an incredible jazz sensibility and ferocious scat singing to many of these songs. Just last weekend I had the privilege of watching her perform with Roberto Menescal, and was blown away by her phrasing, her scat improvisation, and her voice that is still in top notch shape. Leny Andrade has a place among the greatrdy jazz singers of North America. This record is a delight from start to finish. If you ever have some unlightened person in your house, your apartment, or your car who refers to bossa nova as “elevator music,” put on this record and they will shut the hell up.
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bio from allbrazilianmusic

Born in Rio de Janeiro, Leny Andrade began studying the piano at the age of six. Later on, she sang on radio shows for amateur performers and won a scholarship to study at the Brazilian Conservatory of Music. At 15, Leny debuted as a professional singer as crooner of Permínio Gonçalves’ Orchestra. Subsequently, she performed at the nightclubs Bacará (with Sergio Mendes trio) and Bottle’s Bar. In 1965 she caught the public’s attention with the show “Gemini V”, performing with Pery Ribeiro and Bossa Três at the nightclub Porão 73, and released the live recording of that show. After a successful tour round Argentina, Leny moved to Mexico, where she lived for 5 years. In the 70’s, she made albums that mixed samba with avant-garde music, like “Alvoroço” (73) and “Leny Andrade” (75). In 1979, through Columbia, Leny recorded the LP “Registro”, returning to samba-jazz, a music style that Leny has always mastered.

Performing with renowned artists like Dick Farney, Luiz Eça, Wagner Tiso, Eumir Deodato, Francis Hime, Gilson Peranzzetta and João Donato, Leny Andrade established herself as the best Brazilian jazz singer, due to her outstanding ability to improvise. In the 80’s and 90’s, she divided her time between Brazil and the U.S., where she made several samba-jazz records, including classics like “Luz Neon”, for Eldorado. Leny also paid tribute to samba composers like Cartola and Nelson Cavaquinho. Some of her discs include the songs by composers like Cesar Camargo Mariano (“Nós”), Cristóvão Bastos (“Letra & Música/Tom Jobim) and Romero Lubambo (“Coisa Fina”). Leny also recorded a CD of American standards shaped as bossa nova (“Embraceable You”).

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