Eddie Palmieri & Cal Tjader – Bamboleate (1967) 320 kbs

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CD (Fania / Emusica – Remastered Edition 130 217), Released 1967; Re-Issued 2007

This record smokes like a chimney. There really isn’t anything I could add to the review from John Childs at descarga dot net, so here it is

Produced by Pancho Cristal

In about 1965, Cal Tjader showed up in New York where he saw Eddie Palmieri and his Conjunto La Perfecta performing at the Cheetah club. Cal proposed to Eddie that they record together: “Give me your band, the whole shit.” A deal was struck between Morris Levy of Tico Records (Eddie’s label) and Creed Taylor of MGM/Verve (Cal’s) that they do an exchange of artists. The sublime results were El Sonido Nuevo / The New Soul Sound (Verve, 1966) and Bamboleate (Tico, 1967), the second regarded by many as among Tjader’s best, La Perfecta lending a harder edge to his usual work. “The key was Bobby Rodríguez, the greatest Latin bass player we ever had,” said Eddie in 1999. “The band was at its peak.” Bobby solos on “Mi Montuno” which he co-wrote with Eddie. Neither the original vinyl release of Bamboleate nor this reissue credit the sidemen, but in addition to Bobby it’s unmistakably Ismael “Pat” Quintana’s voice providing chorus vocals. Pat calls out the name of Barry (Rogers) during his trombone solo at the beginning of the title track. Though on re-listening to the album after so long, surprisingly to me, is that the voice of Willie Torres calling out “Kako, Kako. A comer” at the opening of the timbales solo on the same track? Other suspects must surely include percussionist Manny Oquendo and Mark Weinstein (who wrote one track) on trombone. A stone classic.
Very Highly Recommended. (John Child, 2007-04-14)

Song titles include:
Bamboleate 3:23
We’ve Loved Before 2:28
Resemblance 5:38
Mi Montuno 5:21
Samba Do Suenho 3:51
Guajira Candela 3:46
Pancho’s Seis Por Ocho 5:36
Come And Get It 3:03
Musicians include:
Eddie Palmieri Piano
Cal Tjader Vibes
Bobby Rodríguez Bass
Barry Rogers, Mark Weinstein Trombones
Ismael Quintana Vocals
…others

Freddie Hubbard – Red Clay (1970) 320 kbs

I’m not typically a huge fan of the CTI catalog. Creed Taylor’s production aesthetic leans towards a sterile polish, with a dampened sense of dynamic, and with the listener feeling like they are hearing everything through headphones even when they’re not. Everything feels close-mic’d to me — the drum sound favors close-mic techniques over overhead microphones that are more common in jazz recordings from the hard-bop era where cats like Hubbard cut their teeth, resulting in a drum sound that doesn’t “breath” or have much “air,” to use the usual sound engineer metaphors. And all this in spite of the fact that the one and only Rudy Van Gelder was manning the controls as lead engineer. But I don’t really know anything about what the CTI situation was like behind the scenes.. Perhaps some kind blog visitor will set me straight.

But this record stands as a shining exception for me. Not that those production elements aren’t still there to some extent, but Hubbard’s vibrant arrangements and the energy of this ensemble overcome them easily. To borrow some imagery from my friend Clint Striker, CTI records are often just too “clean” — they could benefit from being more “dirty.” Well this one still has some grit to it, some “dirt,” particularly in the lovely Fender Rhodes work from Herbie Hancock and Johnny Hammond, the latter on the previously unissued live performance of the title track. This track is in itself worth the price of admission of this remaster. It highlights the funky loose-booty tightness and explosive dynamism that Hubbard’s band was capable of when they were not reined in by Taylor’s hermetic controls.

I think the best way to hear this album is on wax. If I had time – which I don’t — I’d give you all a vinyl rip. But this remaster, loud and brash as it may be, should hold you over. Enjoy!
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Freddie Hubbard – Red Clay (1970) 320 kbs in em pee three

Originally released on CTI
Reissued in 2002 as a Legacy Remaster

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Freddie Hubbard – Backlash (1967) 320 kbs


Thanks to Kung for this rip of the recent remaster. I lost my copy of the first CD pressing years ago, nice to have this again! Next up is Red Clay, my personal favorite. We lost a lot of great artists in 2008, so much so that I’m tired of eulogizing them. Rest well, Freddie…
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Freddie Hubbard – Backlash (1967) 320 kbs

01. Backlash [4:15]
02. The Return Of The Prodigal Son [5:43]
03. Little Sunflower [7:56]
04. Om The Que-Tee [5:48]
05. Up Jumped Spring [6:43]
06. Echoes Of Blues [9:45]

Freddie Hubbard – Trumpet & Fluegehorn
James Spaulding – Flaute & Alto sax
Albert Dailey – Piano
Bob Cunningham – Bass
Otis Ray Appleton – Drums
Ray Baretto – Percussion (1-3)

Review by Scott Yanow, AMG
The first of trumpeter Freddie Hubbard’s three Atlantic albums (reissued on a Koch CD in 2000), this excellent set falls between hard bop and the avant-garde, often hinting at both. Hubbard’s regular group of the time (with James Spaulding on alto and flute, pianist Albert Dailey, bassist Bob Cunningham, and drummer Otis Ray Appleton, plus guest conga player Ray Barretto) performs the debut version of his famous “Little Sunflower,” an excellent remake of “Up Jumped Spring,” and four lesser-known pieces. Hubbard and Spaulding made for an excellent team and there are plenty of exciting moments on this brief but potent set.

Rating: 4.5 Stars
Recording Date: Oct 19, 1966,Oct 24, 1966
Label: Koch
Time: 40:04
LabelAtlantic (2005)

01. Backlash [4:15] 02. The Return Of The Prodigal Son [5:43] 03. Little Sunflower [7:56] 04. Om The Que-Tee [5:48] 05. Up Jumped Spring [6:43] 06. Echoes Of Blues [9:45] Freddie Hubbard – Trumpet & Fluegehorn James Spaulding – Flaute & Alto sax Albert Dailey – Piano Bob Cunningham – Bass Otis Ray Appleton – Drums Ray Baretto – Percussion (1-3) Review by Scott Yanow, AMG The first of trumpeter Freddie Hubbard’s three Atlantic albums (reissued on a Koch CD in 2000), this excellent set falls between hard bop and the avant-garde, often hinting at both. Hubbard’s regular group of the time (with James Spaulding on alto and flute, pianist Albert Dailey, bassist Bob Cunningham, and drummer Otis Ray Appleton, plus guest conga player Ray Barretto) performs the debut version of his famous “Little Sunflower,” an excellent remake of “Up Jumped Spring,” and four lesser-known pieces. Hubbard and Spaulding made for an excellent team and there are plenty of exciting moments on this brief but potent set. Rating: 4.5 Stars Recording Date: Oct 19, 1966,Oct 24, 1966 Label: Koch Time: 40:04 LabelAtlantic (2005)”>
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Ray Barretto – The Message (1972) 320kbs

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Ray Barretto
“The Message”
Released 1972, Fania Records
Release Date Jul 17, 2007
Studio/Live Studio
Mono/Stereo Stereo
Producer Ray Barretto
Engineer Irv Greenbaum
Recording Time 35 minutes
Personnel Ray Barretto – congas
Orestes Vilato – timbales
Andy Gonzalez – bass
Roberto Rodriguez – trumpet
Johnny “Dandy” Rodriguez – bongos
Rene Lopez
Joseph “Papy” Roman
Louis Cruz – piano

From Dusty Groove
One of Ray Barretto’s hardest-hitting salsa albums of the 70s — a raw set of grooves that’s got Ray moving away from the playfulness of the Latin Soul years, into a more righteous mode that’s easily guessed at from the title of the set! The vibe here is very straightforward — with Ray coming down hard on conga, and working with a group that features Adalberto Santiago on lead vocals, plus Orestes Vilato on timbales, Andy Gonzalez on bass, and Luis Cruz on piano. The sound is spare and raw — and titles include the wonderfully echoey tune “O Elefante”, with some great elephant-like work on trumpet — plus “Con El Cimarron”, “Se Traba”, “Arrepientete”, and “Te Traigo Mi Son”.

Review by José A. Estévez, Jr.

Bandleader/conga player Ray Barretto continued to assert himself as one of the premier mainstream salsa catalysts of the early ’70s with one of his most celebrated albums. Barretto, bass player Andy Gonzalez, pianist/arranger Louis Cruz, timbales master Orestes Vilató, and bongo player Johnny Rodríguez contribute to the band’s tough rhythm section; of course, vocalist Adalberto Santiago is a knockout on tunes like the hilarious “Se Traba” and the memorable “Alma Con Alma.” One of Barretto’s top albums of the 1970s and another example of what made New York salsa so special.

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Ray Barretto looking curiously like Al Franken….

Ray Barretto – The Message (1972) 320kbs em pee three

Manu Dibango – Africadelic (1975) 320 kbs

Manu Dibango
Released 1973
This pressing 2006, Hi Fly Reocrds

1 The Panther 2:29
2 Soul Fiesta 2:08
3 Africadelic 2:16
4 African Battle 3:00
5 Black Beauty 2:50
6 African Carnaval 3:16
7 Moving Waves 4:03
8 Afro-Soul 2:44
9 Oriental Sunset 1:47
10 Monkey Beat 2:42
11 Wa-Wa 3:03
12 Percussion Storm 1:54

AFRICADELIC is the classic 1973 album composed and recorded in the span of one week by Manu Dibango, after the encouraging success of his monster hit “Soul Mokossa.” Here he continues to fuse Afro-Caribbean flavors with the contemporary Latin … Full Descriptionand funk influences of the day, resulting in a highly soulful, highly danceable album.

DUSTY GROOVE says

Incredibly funky work from Manu Dibango — a set that’s easily as great as his classic Soul Makossa album — but which is a lot more obscure overall! The work’s got a fiercely-jamming quality all the way through — lots of rumbling percussion at the bottom, and also a bit of keyboards as well — served up in a heady brew that turns out to be a perfect setting for Dibango’s sharp-edged reeds! The record’s got a few especially great break tracks, but all numbers are pretty darn great too — filled with more funky changes, flaring horns, and 70s-styled grooves than you might ever hope to find in a single album! Tracks include “Black Beauty”, “Soul Fiesta”, “The Panther”, “Africadelic”, “Moving Waves”, “Afro Soul”, “Wa Wa”, “Percussion Storm”, “Monkey Beat”, and “Oriental Sunset”.

It might be an attempt to quickly cash in on the success of Soul Makossa, but it’s still an amazing record from start to finish. Enjoy!

Check out the very very nice Manu Dibango Discography over at Soundological Investigations!

Muhal Richard Abrams – Levels and Degrees of Light (1967) 320 kbs


Muhal Richard Abrams – Levels And Degrees Of Light (1967) 320 kbs {DD 413}

Review by Brian Olewnick (allmusic.com)
Levels and Degrees of Light was the first recording under Muhal Richard Abrams’ name and was a landmark album that launched the first in a long line of beautiful, musical salvos from the AACM toward the mainstream jazz world. The title track finds Abrams broadly tracing out some of the territory he would continue to explore in succeeding decades, an ethereal, mystic quality (evinced by Penelope Taylor’s otherworldly vocalizing and Gordon Emmanuel’s shimmering vibes) balanced by a harsh and earthy bluesiness set forth by the leader’s piercing clarinet. “The Bird Song” begins with a fine, dark poetry recitation by David Moore (oh! for the days when one didn’t approach a poem on a jazz album with great trepidation) before evanescing into a whirlwind of percussion, bird whistles, and violin (the latter by Leroy Jenkins in one of his first recorded appearances). When the band enters at full strength with Anthony Braxton (in his first recording session), the effect is explosive and liberating, as though Abrams’ band had stood on the shoulders of Coltrane, Coleman, and Taylor and taken a massive, daring leap into the future. It’s a historic performance. The final track offers several unaccompanied solo opportunities, spotlighting Abrams’ sumptuous piano and the under-recognized bass abilities of Charles Clark. This is a milestone recording and belongs in the collection of any modern jazz fan.

Tracks
1. Levels And Degrees Of Light
2. The Bird Song
3. My Thoughts Are My Future-Now And Forever