Ray Barretto – The Message (1972) 320kbs

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Ray Barretto
“The Message”
Released 1972, Fania Records
Release Date Jul 17, 2007
Studio/Live Studio
Mono/Stereo Stereo
Producer Ray Barretto
Engineer Irv Greenbaum
Recording Time 35 minutes
Personnel Ray Barretto – congas
Orestes Vilato – timbales
Andy Gonzalez – bass
Roberto Rodriguez – trumpet
Johnny “Dandy” Rodriguez – bongos
Rene Lopez
Joseph “Papy” Roman
Louis Cruz – piano

From Dusty Groove
One of Ray Barretto’s hardest-hitting salsa albums of the 70s — a raw set of grooves that’s got Ray moving away from the playfulness of the Latin Soul years, into a more righteous mode that’s easily guessed at from the title of the set! The vibe here is very straightforward — with Ray coming down hard on conga, and working with a group that features Adalberto Santiago on lead vocals, plus Orestes Vilato on timbales, Andy Gonzalez on bass, and Luis Cruz on piano. The sound is spare and raw — and titles include the wonderfully echoey tune “O Elefante”, with some great elephant-like work on trumpet — plus “Con El Cimarron”, “Se Traba”, “Arrepientete”, and “Te Traigo Mi Son”.

Review by José A. Estévez, Jr.

Bandleader/conga player Ray Barretto continued to assert himself as one of the premier mainstream salsa catalysts of the early ’70s with one of his most celebrated albums. Barretto, bass player Andy Gonzalez, pianist/arranger Louis Cruz, timbales master Orestes Vilató, and bongo player Johnny Rodríguez contribute to the band’s tough rhythm section; of course, vocalist Adalberto Santiago is a knockout on tunes like the hilarious “Se Traba” and the memorable “Alma Con Alma.” One of Barretto’s top albums of the 1970s and another example of what made New York salsa so special.

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Ray Barretto looking curiously like Al Franken….

Ray Barretto – The Message (1972) 320kbs em pee three

Manu Dibango – Africadelic (1975) 320 kbs

Manu Dibango
Released 1973
This pressing 2006, Hi Fly Reocrds

1 The Panther 2:29
2 Soul Fiesta 2:08
3 Africadelic 2:16
4 African Battle 3:00
5 Black Beauty 2:50
6 African Carnaval 3:16
7 Moving Waves 4:03
8 Afro-Soul 2:44
9 Oriental Sunset 1:47
10 Monkey Beat 2:42
11 Wa-Wa 3:03
12 Percussion Storm 1:54

AFRICADELIC is the classic 1973 album composed and recorded in the span of one week by Manu Dibango, after the encouraging success of his monster hit “Soul Mokossa.” Here he continues to fuse Afro-Caribbean flavors with the contemporary Latin … Full Descriptionand funk influences of the day, resulting in a highly soulful, highly danceable album.

DUSTY GROOVE says

Incredibly funky work from Manu Dibango — a set that’s easily as great as his classic Soul Makossa album — but which is a lot more obscure overall! The work’s got a fiercely-jamming quality all the way through — lots of rumbling percussion at the bottom, and also a bit of keyboards as well — served up in a heady brew that turns out to be a perfect setting for Dibango’s sharp-edged reeds! The record’s got a few especially great break tracks, but all numbers are pretty darn great too — filled with more funky changes, flaring horns, and 70s-styled grooves than you might ever hope to find in a single album! Tracks include “Black Beauty”, “Soul Fiesta”, “The Panther”, “Africadelic”, “Moving Waves”, “Afro Soul”, “Wa Wa”, “Percussion Storm”, “Monkey Beat”, and “Oriental Sunset”.

It might be an attempt to quickly cash in on the success of Soul Makossa, but it’s still an amazing record from start to finish. Enjoy!

Check out the very very nice Manu Dibango Discography over at Soundological Investigations!

Muhal Richard Abrams – Levels and Degrees of Light (1967) 320 kbs


Muhal Richard Abrams – Levels And Degrees Of Light (1967) 320 kbs {DD 413}

Review by Brian Olewnick (allmusic.com)
Levels and Degrees of Light was the first recording under Muhal Richard Abrams’ name and was a landmark album that launched the first in a long line of beautiful, musical salvos from the AACM toward the mainstream jazz world. The title track finds Abrams broadly tracing out some of the territory he would continue to explore in succeeding decades, an ethereal, mystic quality (evinced by Penelope Taylor’s otherworldly vocalizing and Gordon Emmanuel’s shimmering vibes) balanced by a harsh and earthy bluesiness set forth by the leader’s piercing clarinet. “The Bird Song” begins with a fine, dark poetry recitation by David Moore (oh! for the days when one didn’t approach a poem on a jazz album with great trepidation) before evanescing into a whirlwind of percussion, bird whistles, and violin (the latter by Leroy Jenkins in one of his first recorded appearances). When the band enters at full strength with Anthony Braxton (in his first recording session), the effect is explosive and liberating, as though Abrams’ band had stood on the shoulders of Coltrane, Coleman, and Taylor and taken a massive, daring leap into the future. It’s a historic performance. The final track offers several unaccompanied solo opportunities, spotlighting Abrams’ sumptuous piano and the under-recognized bass abilities of Charles Clark. This is a milestone recording and belongs in the collection of any modern jazz fan.

Tracks
1. Levels And Degrees Of Light
2. The Bird Song
3. My Thoughts Are My Future-Now And Forever

Carmen Miranda, for Caymmi (1914-2008)

Well, I wanted to make a tribute to Dorival Caymmi, the tower of Brazilian song who passed away yesterday in Rio at 94 years of age. But until I have time to do vinyl rips, I found I had nothing to share that isn’t available over at Loronix, where you will also find a very nice post remembering Caymmi with some wonderful quotations from notables who have been deeply affected and influenced by the man and his music.

Instead I’ve chosen a different approach by posting some music I think he would have liked to listen to along with us, from a woman who was very important to putting his career in the spotlight early on – Carmen Miranda. This is a collection of her recordings from 1930 to 1945, and while it doesn’t feature any of Caymmi’s music it does feature songs from his colleague Ary Barroso as well as titles from Luiz Peixoto, Andre Filho, and Assis Valente. Highly recommended for understanding why Carmen was a huge star in Brazil before Hollywood got hold of her.

CARMEN MIRANDA
Carmen Miranda (1930-1945)
Released on Harlequin Records, 1997

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1 Iaiá, Ioiô 3:10 José Barros
2 Pra Você Gostar de Mim (Taí) 3:20
3 Quero Ver Você Chorar 3:19
4 Dona Balbina 2:57 (José Barros)
5 Cuidado Hein! 2:42 (Andre Filho)
6 Malandro 2:37 (Andre Filho)
7 Moleque Indigesto 3:00 (Lamartine Babo)
8 Um Pouquinho… 3:29
9 Na Batucada da Vida 3:43 (Ary Barroso, Luís Peixoto )
10 Mamãe Não Quer 2:06
11 Elogio da Raça 3:18 (Assis Valente)
12 Pra Quem Sabe Dar Valor 2:58 (Assis Valente)
13 Amor! Amor! 3:03
14 Eu Quero Casar Com Você 2:08 (Andre Filho)
15 Minha Deusa Partiu 2:49 (Ary Barroso)
16 Balance
17 Minha Terra Tem Palmeiras 2:30
18 Boneca de Piche 3:20 (Ary Barroso)
19 Salada Mista 3:15 (Ary Barroso)
20 A Pensão da Dona Stella 2:57 (Oswaldo Santiago, Paulo Barbosa)
21 Cuidado Com a Gaita Do Ary 2:41 (Oswaldo Santiago, Paulo Barbosa)
22 Voltei Pro Morro 2:52
23 Tico-Tico No Fubá 2:36 (Luís Peixoto)

One can immediately feel the difference between this and Harlequin’s earlier release The Brazilian Recordings. The CD kicks off with a type of syncopated pop jazz whose most Brazilian element is the language. This might disappoint some, but it’s good pop jazz. The lion’s share of this CD comes from the period before Carmen joined forces with Bando da Lua, the excellent band who joined her when she went to the US. That is not to say that this album is all pop jazz material. Within a few tracks, it’s firmly in uniquely Brazilian territory. By virtue of it being earlier material, one can hear different instrumentation than when Carmen was performing with Bando da Lua. Some feature jazz band orchestra, some small Brazilian combo of guitar, flute and percussion, others a hybrid of popular jazz band instruments and a Brazilian batucada section. Brazil has long been a font of such syncretism and it’s immensely enjoyable as exemplified in the tracks on this collection. One of the more curious tracks is “Minha deusa partiu.” Carmen cannot be obviously heard in this song but it swings, even sporting a Mills Brothers-like bit of instrument imitation. One wishes for more details about the actual recording session and side artists, but perhaps records don’t exist for this. With the explosion of interest in all Brazilian music from bossa nova to tropicalismo, it’s time to examine the undeserved reputation of Carmen Miranda as a sellout and let the recordings speak for themselves. ~ Megan Lynch, All Music Guide

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