Leny Andrade – Estamos Aí (1965)

Happy Birthday to Flabbergasted Vibes! We are 1 years old!!

 

 

Leny Andrade
“Estamos Aí”
Released 1965 on CID/ODEONProduced by Milton Miranda
Orchestral arrangements by Eumir Deodato1-Estamos aí
(Regina Werneck – Maurício Einhorn – Durval Ferreira)
2-A resposta
(Paulo Sergio Valle – Marcos Valle)
3-Pot-pourri:
• Deixa o morro cantar
(Tito Madi)
• O morro não tem vez
(Tom Jobim-Vinicius de Moraes)
• Opinião
(Zé Keti)
• Enquanto a tristeza não vem
(Sergio Ricardo)
• Reza
(Edu Lobo-Ruy Guerra)
4-Clichê
(Maurício Einhorn – Durval Ferreira)
5-Olhando o mar
(Ronaldo Soares – Arthur Verocai)
6-Banzo
(Odilon Olyntho – Marcos Valle)
7-Samba de rei
(Pingarilho – Marcos de Vasconcellos)
8-Tema feliz
(Regina Werneck – Durval Ferreira)
9-Razão de viver
(Paulo Sergio Valle – Eumir Deodato)
10-Esqueça não
(Tito Madi)
11-Samba em Paris
(Nelsinho)
12-Coisa nuvem
(Roberto Nascimento – Victor Freire)

Recorded when she was only 22 years old, this record is what one might call a “powerhouse.” Not only is she performing compositions by a stable-full of the great songwriters of bossa nova — Tito Madi, Marcos Valle, Jobim & Vinicius, Edu Lobo / Ruy Guerra, Zé Keti, and the still under-appreciated Arthur Verocai — she is also one of the most energetic and sophisticated vocalists of the genre. In particular she brings an incredible jazz sensibility and ferocious scat singing to many of these songs. Just last weekend I had the privilege of watching her perform with Roberto Menescal, and was blown away by her phrasing, her scat improvisation, and her voice that is still in top notch shape. Leny Andrade has a place among the greatrdy jazz singers of North America. This record is a delight from start to finish. If you ever have some unlightened person in your house, your apartment, or your car who refers to bossa nova as “elevator music,” put on this record and they will shut the hell up.
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bio from allbrazilianmusic

Born in Rio de Janeiro, Leny Andrade began studying the piano at the age of six. Later on, she sang on radio shows for amateur performers and won a scholarship to study at the Brazilian Conservatory of Music. At 15, Leny debuted as a professional singer as crooner of Permínio Gonçalves’ Orchestra. Subsequently, she performed at the nightclubs Bacará (with Sergio Mendes trio) and Bottle’s Bar. In 1965 she caught the public’s attention with the show “Gemini V”, performing with Pery Ribeiro and Bossa Três at the nightclub Porão 73, and released the live recording of that show. After a successful tour round Argentina, Leny moved to Mexico, where she lived for 5 years. In the 70’s, she made albums that mixed samba with avant-garde music, like “Alvoroço” (73) and “Leny Andrade” (75). In 1979, through Columbia, Leny recorded the LP “Registro”, returning to samba-jazz, a music style that Leny has always mastered.

Performing with renowned artists like Dick Farney, Luiz Eça, Wagner Tiso, Eumir Deodato, Francis Hime, Gilson Peranzzetta and João Donato, Leny Andrade established herself as the best Brazilian jazz singer, due to her outstanding ability to improvise. In the 80’s and 90’s, she divided her time between Brazil and the U.S., where she made several samba-jazz records, including classics like “Luz Neon”, for Eldorado. Leny also paid tribute to samba composers like Cartola and Nelson Cavaquinho. Some of her discs include the songs by composers like Cesar Camargo Mariano (“Nós”), Cristóvão Bastos (“Letra & Música/Tom Jobim) and Romero Lubambo (“Coisa Fina”). Leny also recorded a CD of American standards shaped as bossa nova (“Embraceable You”).

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Blackbyrds – The Blackbyrds / Flying Start (1973/74) 320kbs and FLAC

Thanks to KUNG for this rip of these wonderful two albums issued together. No time for the type of review this deserves, not this week, but you can read the back cover. I’ve just been enjoying this too much lately to keep all the fun to myself. ENJOY! And thanks again Kung!

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Blackbyrds (1973) and Flying Start (1974) at 320kbs

in FLAC…

Gil Scott-Heron & Brian Jackson – Bridges (1977) 320kbs

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Gil Scott-Heron & Brian Jackson
“Bridges”
Released 1977
Japanese CD Reissue

This is one of my favorite records from Gil and Brian, absolutely. At one point I had this idea that I was going to share his entire classic discography from the 70s here, but then I ran out of steam and time. So I decided to jump ahead to this wonderful record. A long and wonderful review is deserved, but I am choosing to keep it brief this time. One memory I have of this record is turning my friend T on to it. Turning T on to music he doesn’t know is pretty difficult – the guy is ten years younger than I am and seems to have five times the musical knowledge, seems to have listened to everything under the sun, and has a pretty amazing collection. So I was rather proud to find a record he didn’t know. At first I just gave him one track, that I consider the centerpiece of the album, “We Almost Lost Detroit.” We were both living in Ann Arbor and T had grown up and spent most of his life in Michigan with family all over the Detroit area. I knew that the song was about stuff that actually went down in the 70s when a nuclear reactor has a partial melt-down and came very close to becoming a 3-Mile Island, and failed to be covered in the press in any significant way. Given the economic, social, and color profile of the city of Detroit, and the neighborhoods where the reactor is located, there is a lot of, um, food for thought here, to put it mildly… But leave it to T to learn what I didn’t know — that the song was titled after a book by the same name, by a John Fuller — which he of course tracked down and read. Guys like him restore my faith in humanity, I swear. Gil is famous for his songs offering pointed commentary on contemporary sociopolitical situations, but what makes this song slightly different than most of those (Johannesburg for example) is that it is not a fist-pumping rally-cry but a sad, mournful, soulful expression of a disaster narrowly averted and the forgotten people in already-devastated cities and ghettos whose lives would have been utterly ruined by it. It’s mellow groove belies the lyrical content, or at least acts as a sort of counterweight that creates tension. And then there is that famous keyboard line of Brian Jackson that has been sampled by a million people, coming at just the right place. Rather than my usual streaming audio sample I am including a link from U-tube, its a bit ‘lossy’ and crappy sounding but that should motivate you to get the real deal below.

1 Hello Sunday! Hello Road!
2 Song of the Wind
3 Racetrack in France
4 Vild (Deaf, Dumb and Blind)
5 Under the Hammer
6 We Almost Lost Detroit Jackson, Scott-Heron
7 Tuskeegee #626
8 Delta Man (Where I’m Comin’ From)
9 95 South (All of the Places We’ve Been)

Aside from this landmark song, the rest of the album is also fantastic, a really solid work that show Gil and Brian beginning a new phase of their prolific partnership.

GIL-SCOTT HERON & BRIAN JACKSON – Bridges (1977) 320kbs

Gil-Scott Heron & Brian Jackson – Bridges (1977) FLAC LOSSLESS
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LINER NOTES

Liner Notes
Brian Jackson and I have been writing music and performing together since 1969. From January of 1970 when we started traveling as the nucleus of a group call “Black & Blues” til now, mid ’77, responses from communities both far and near, have given us an opportunity to take our art to the streets and stages and share it with people we might otherwise never have encountered. Somehow, in even the most distant setting, the warmth and sincerity of the brothers and sisters we have come in contact with, has made us feel at home. Music has been our common denominator; our vehicle; the mutual vibration that gives us a focus, but the ideas and spirit behind the music has been the adhesive and inspiration for continued attempts to communicate.

There is a revolution going on in the world. We are very much a part of it and have a great deal to contribute to the force and direction of this revolution. There are many fronts within this struggle, many far flung outposts geographically isolated and distant from our mainstreams of communication. But everyone who struggles for a better life for oppressed people is an ally who could use any symbol of our concern and solidarity. There is a growing guerrilla movement in Southern Africa, a period of healing and rebuilding in Southeast Asia, a movement towards economic independence in the Caribbean and we are a part of it all. In our own lives the struggle to educate continues: to bring the need for positive change into focus; to bring about
a new understanding of the dynamics of change.

All things change. From the wheel to the automobile. From you, diapers, stuffed animals and bronzed baby shoes, to you in high school, in love, in debt. And the social dynamics and perimeters during your lifetime have exploded into a thousand fragments of liberation movements and human rights demands. It has been a revolution that ignited in the eyes of Asian peasant and African Bushmen and Afro-American Corner Kings who began to direct this inevitable change. It is a revolution in full stride that has changed, irrevocably, our understanding of ourselves in this society as it has demythologized so many of the impressions of black/white, wrong/right that imprisoned us all.

We still believe, as did El Hajj Malik Shabazz (Malcolm X) among others, that America has the potential to undergo a bloodless revolution, in that change may come without pitched battles in the street. But there has already been bloodshed and stains are fresh. It is winter and we are regaining our strength. The key to our progress lies within our ability to support alliances between ourselves and Third World people. The support begins here. In solidarity with chicanos, Puerto Riquenos, Oriental American and Native Americans we will continue to focus on the need for justice and opportunity. We have debts to pays. In the interest of comrades who have contributed their lives, as well as in our own interest.

Pharoah Sanders – Live at the East (2007) 320kbs

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Pharoah Sanders – Live At The East

01 – Healing Song
02 – Memories Of J.W. Coltrane
03 – Lumkili

Pharoah Sanders – tenor sax
Harold Vic – tenor sax, voices
Marvin Peterson – trumpet
Carlos Garnett – flute, voices
Joseph Bonner – piano, harmonium
Stanley Clarke – bass
Cecil McBee – bass
Norman Connors – drums
Lawrence Killian – conga drums, bailophone
Billy Hart – drums

Recorded: 1971 Live at ‘The East’, NYC

Taken from the Japanese CD: UCCI-9133

I woke up in another hemisphere
And you were gone.
I had no address,
No telephone
No family
No identity.
I spent the mornings sleeping in and the afternoons
Walking broken sidewalks in the unbelievable heat and light
Reacquainting myself with exile
Circumspectly watching the tourists, trying not to feel like one
Stranger
Climb the hills of the old city, a never-ending conversation in my skull
Like when I would hike in the mountains alone
Except, here, I was surrounded by thousands of people
Strangers
I woke up in a another month
And you still weren´t there
But there was a telephone now
And almost a place to live, to call home, though it was getting hard to find.
I was surrounded by beautiful music, beautiful bodies
Dancing beautifully and naturally as this language I can barely speak
My ears vibrate with a quiet joy but bittersweet
As I walk down the broken sidewalks to my temporary bed
To riotous American Soul Music inside my head, reminding me of
The only dance partner who really meant much
A trumpet riffing ‘Camp Town Races’ makes me grin in the new moon’s half-light
I knew at that moment that I was in need of a Healing Song
And I did not, not yet, know just how deep that need can ache.

Eddie Palmieri & Cal Tjader – Bamboleate (1967) 320 kbs

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CD (Fania / Emusica – Remastered Edition 130 217), Released 1967; Re-Issued 2007

This record smokes like a chimney. There really isn’t anything I could add to the review from John Childs at descarga dot net, so here it is

Produced by Pancho Cristal

In about 1965, Cal Tjader showed up in New York where he saw Eddie Palmieri and his Conjunto La Perfecta performing at the Cheetah club. Cal proposed to Eddie that they record together: “Give me your band, the whole shit.” A deal was struck between Morris Levy of Tico Records (Eddie’s label) and Creed Taylor of MGM/Verve (Cal’s) that they do an exchange of artists. The sublime results were El Sonido Nuevo / The New Soul Sound (Verve, 1966) and Bamboleate (Tico, 1967), the second regarded by many as among Tjader’s best, La Perfecta lending a harder edge to his usual work. “The key was Bobby Rodríguez, the greatest Latin bass player we ever had,” said Eddie in 1999. “The band was at its peak.” Bobby solos on “Mi Montuno” which he co-wrote with Eddie. Neither the original vinyl release of Bamboleate nor this reissue credit the sidemen, but in addition to Bobby it’s unmistakably Ismael “Pat” Quintana’s voice providing chorus vocals. Pat calls out the name of Barry (Rogers) during his trombone solo at the beginning of the title track. Though on re-listening to the album after so long, surprisingly to me, is that the voice of Willie Torres calling out “Kako, Kako. A comer” at the opening of the timbales solo on the same track? Other suspects must surely include percussionist Manny Oquendo and Mark Weinstein (who wrote one track) on trombone. A stone classic.
Very Highly Recommended. (John Child, 2007-04-14)

Song titles include:
Bamboleate 3:23
We’ve Loved Before 2:28
Resemblance 5:38
Mi Montuno 5:21
Samba Do Suenho 3:51
Guajira Candela 3:46
Pancho’s Seis Por Ocho 5:36
Come And Get It 3:03
Musicians include:
Eddie Palmieri Piano
Cal Tjader Vibes
Bobby Rodríguez Bass
Barry Rogers, Mark Weinstein Trombones
Ismael Quintana Vocals
…others

Freddie Hubbard – Red Clay (1970) 320 kbs

I’m not typically a huge fan of the CTI catalog. Creed Taylor’s production aesthetic leans towards a sterile polish, with a dampened sense of dynamic, and with the listener feeling like they are hearing everything through headphones even when they’re not. Everything feels close-mic’d to me — the drum sound favors close-mic techniques over overhead microphones that are more common in jazz recordings from the hard-bop era where cats like Hubbard cut their teeth, resulting in a drum sound that doesn’t “breath” or have much “air,” to use the usual sound engineer metaphors. And all this in spite of the fact that the one and only Rudy Van Gelder was manning the controls as lead engineer. But I don’t really know anything about what the CTI situation was like behind the scenes.. Perhaps some kind blog visitor will set me straight.

But this record stands as a shining exception for me. Not that those production elements aren’t still there to some extent, but Hubbard’s vibrant arrangements and the energy of this ensemble overcome them easily. To borrow some imagery from my friend Clint Striker, CTI records are often just too “clean” — they could benefit from being more “dirty.” Well this one still has some grit to it, some “dirt,” particularly in the lovely Fender Rhodes work from Herbie Hancock and Johnny Hammond, the latter on the previously unissued live performance of the title track. This track is in itself worth the price of admission of this remaster. It highlights the funky loose-booty tightness and explosive dynamism that Hubbard’s band was capable of when they were not reined in by Taylor’s hermetic controls.

I think the best way to hear this album is on wax. If I had time – which I don’t — I’d give you all a vinyl rip. But this remaster, loud and brash as it may be, should hold you over. Enjoy!
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Freddie Hubbard – Red Clay (1970) 320 kbs in em pee three

Originally released on CTI
Reissued in 2002 as a Legacy Remaster

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