Paulinho da Viola – Foi um rio que passou a minha vida (1970)

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PAULINHO DA VIOLA – Foi um rio que passou em minha vida

• 1970 ( emi 852504 2 )
1. para não contraria você ( paulinho da viola )
2. o meu pecado ( zé keti )
3. estou marcado ( paulinho da viola )
4. lamentação ( mauro duarte )
5. mesmo sem alegria ( paulinho da viola )
6. foi um rio que passou em minha vida ( paulinho da viola )
7. tudo se transformou ( paulinho da viola )
8. nada de novo ( paulinho da viola )
9. jurar com lágrimas ( paulinho da viola )
10. papo furado ( paulinho da viola )
11. não quero vocé assim ( paulinho da viola )
faixas bônus ( cd )
12. sinal fechado ( paulinho da viola )
13. ruas que sonhei ( paulinho da viola )

This is a fabulous record, with everything you would expect and nothing less from the inimitable Paulinho da Viola. Great musicianship, flawless songwriting, Paulinho’s voice (like butter!). It starts with a song, it ends with another song, it has highlights, it has a cool album cover, it is recorded really well, it is mastered by the masterful mastering engineer Pete Mayhew at Abbey Road, ba ba ba ba yadda yadda yadda, you get the idea.

What I REALLY wanted to write about was one of the bonus tracks on here, ‘Sinal Fechado’, released as a single.

I thought about providing a straight translation of it, but it would be hard to do it justice in any language but its own. The lyrics are simple, really, with scant repetition, arranged as a dialogue between two people in alternating lines. The idea is beautifully simple – two former lovers who have not seen each other in ages, running into each other on the street at the same corner. One of them (let’s say, a man – it’s never specified) is about to cross the street, and they have only a moment to talk before the traffic light changes. He apologies for not having more time to converse, “Forgive me, but hurry is the soul of our times…” [literally, ‘business’] The other implores him not to worry about it, she too has to run. When will you give me a call? We need to catch up. Next week I promise, maybe, we’ll see each other. Who knows? It’s been a long time… Yes, it has been a long time.
“I had so many things to say, but I disappeared in the dust of the streets.”
“I too had much something to say, but the memory hid from me.”
Please, call me, I need to
Drink something, quickly.
Next week….
The signal…
I’ll look for you…
It’s going to change, it’s going to open…
Promise, don’t forget, don’t forget…
Goodbye

As it’s presented this way, this is a stirring vignette of romance and estrangement, love and distance. The lyrics play off the halting arpregiated and rather dissonant chords of Paulinho’s guitar that run through the song, punctuated only briefly by syncopated chords more familiar to samba and bossa nova. The string arrangements accent the tension, weaving a second melody that feels like a third voice in the dialog, the unspoken subtext. Extremely powerful, the song manages to feel both stark and warm at the same time. It terms of structure and execution, it’s quite different from Paulinho’s usual styles of writing, creating the suspicion that this is more than just another melancholic love song among many. The entire piece also works as a metonym for the feelings of Brazilians held under the heel of the military dictatorship (which grew considerably more oppressive in the same time Paulinho was writing this song, after the passing of Institutional Act No.5 that decimated political rights and civil liberties). Looked at from that perspective, everything becomes multivalent and laced with double-meaning. This was a technique used by many Brazilian songwriters – Chico Buarque most famously – to evade the censorship to which all popular music at the time was being subjected. A certain grim satisfaction was attained by fooling the authorities, a joke at their expense in a way – and if any questions or doubts were raised by the censorship board, the composer could simply respond, “It’s a love song, that’s all.” Throughout the seventies, songwriters adopted this as a deliberate technique – however I am not sure if that’s what Paulinho da Viola was doing here. In many ways it’s a tired and academic question, to look for the ‘hidden meaning’ of a work of art. Part of the magical quality of so many varieties of song is the refusal to spell things out, to assign hard and fast correspondences to word, tone, context, hard facts… I am not interested in robbing the composer or the listener of that magic. But I think it’s safe to say that many listeners in 1970 heard this song with ears informed by the political and social oppression that was becoming more and more part of daily life. The song was covered a few years later by Chico Buarque on the record “Meus Caros Amigos,” and later by Elis Regina on “Tranvsersal do Tempo” as part of a show that was rife with this shuttling back and forth between the emotions of interpersonal relations and political realities. They are not, after all, discrete phenomenon. People loved and lost and married and had children all the while that people were being “disappeared” in Brazil, in Chile, in Argentina… Just as the unjust war in Iraq has affected so many lives for six years and counting, or the inexcusable massacres in Gaza leave scars on our eyes. People move on and live their lives and find ways to nourish their spirit, attempting dignity no matter how ignoble the situation, putting energy into their families, their work, their art. “Hurry is the soul of our times,” indeed, but songs as perfect as ‘Sinal Fechado’ make you stop, and listen.

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Vinicius & Odette Lara (1963)

All compositions by Baden Powell & Vinicius de Moraes
Arrangements by Moacir Santos

1. Berimbau
2. Só Por Amor
3. Deixa
4. Seja Feliz
5. Mulher Carioca
6. Samba Em Prelúdio
7. Labareda
8. E Hoje Só
9. O Astronauta
10. Deve Ser Amor
11. Samba da Bênção
12. Além Do Amor

Credits: Arranged By, Conductor – Moacir Santos
Liner Notes – Ruy Castro
Artwork By [Cover] – Cesar G. Villela
Artwork By [Original Covers Courtasy] – Caetano Rodriguez
Other [Lyrics Research] – Luiza Reis
Other [Tape Archives] – William Tardelli
Photography – Francisco Pereira
Producer [Assistant] – José Delphino Filho
Producer [Manager] – Peter Keller
Producer [Production Director] – Aloysio De Oliveira
Recorded By [Recording Engineer] – Norman Sternberg
Remastered By [Restored & Adapated From Original Lps] – Cilene Affonso
Remastered By, Edited By – Carlos Freitas , Jade Pereira
Vocals – Odette Lara (tracks: 2 to 8, 10 to 12) , Vinicius De Moraes (tracks: 1, 3, 5 to 7, 9 to 11)
Written-By – Baden Powell , Vinicius De Moraes
Notes: Recorded in 1963 at studio Rio Som S.A.
Originally released on the brazilian Elenco Label, 1963.
Remastered and edited at Classic Master, São Paulo in July/August, 2003.

THIS ALBUM can be a little uneven at times but it very much worth having. It has been sitting on my fileserver so long that people were starting to find it and DL even though there were no links to it anywhere, so it’s about time I made a post!!!

Cartola – O mundo é um moinho (1976)

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Cartola
O mundo é um moinho
1976 Discos Marcus Pereira

1. O Mundo É Um Moinho
2. Minha
3. Sala De Recepção
4. Não Posso Viver Sem Ela
5. Preciso Me Encontrar
6. Peito Vazio
7. Aconteceu
8. As Rosas Não Falam
9. Sei Chorar
10. Ensaboa Mulata
11. Senhora Tentação
12. Cordas De Aço

The opening title track was written for Cartola’s daughter who left their home in Mangueira at 16 and (in the story I’ve heard, anyway) ended up working as a prostitute. It’s a classic, as is all of this record and especially ‘Sala de recepção’, ‘Aconteceu’, ‘Preciso me encontrar’, ‘As rosas não falam’… So many great songs!! Although Cartola had been instrumental to the development of samba during the 1930s and ran the most famous samba club in Rio with his wife Zica beginning in the early 60s, he did not record any material until the age of 66. This is his second album. You can read more about Cartola in a brief article at Wikipedia here, which is also where I grabbed the lyrics and a decent translation of the above mentioned track. I don’t think I really understood samba until I heard Cartola’s first two records. Ever since then, I’ve been in love with the art form. This is samba at it’s best, period.

O mundo é um moinho

Ainda é cedo, amor.
Mal começaste a conhecer a vida,
Já anuncias a hora de partida
Sem saber mesmo o rumo que irás tomar.

Preste atenção, querida,
Embora eu saiba que estás resolvida.
Em cada esquina cai um pouco tua vida.
Em pouco tempo não serás mais o que és.

Ouça-me bem, amor.
Preste atenção, o mundo é um moinho.
Vai triturar teus sonhos tão mesquinhos,
Vai reduzir as ilusões a pó.

Preste atenção, querida.
De cada amor tu herdarás só o cinismo.
Quando notares estás à beira do abismo.
Abismo que cavaste com teus pés.

Translation:

It’s still early, love.
You’ve barely started to know life,
You already announce the hour of departure
Without even knowing the direction you’ll take.

Pay attention, dear,
Although I know that you made up your mind
In each corner falls a little your life
Soon you’ll no longer be what you are.

Listen carefully, love.
Pay attention, the world is a mill.
It will grind your paltry dreams,
It will reduce your illusions to dust.

Pay attention, dear.
From each love, you’ll inherit only cynicism.
When you notice, you’re at the edge of the abyss.
Abyss you dug with your own feet.

Jorge Ben – Africa Brasil (1976) [320]

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

Some great funk here and a classic still going strong! I´ve enjoyed this album so many times and I was thinking there might be some not listened to it yet. Now´s your chance!

Review by Phil Jandovsky, All Music Guide
This 1976 album is undoubtedly one of the greatest classics of Brazilian popular music, with Jorge Ben mixing funky samba, Afro-Brazilian beats, and crunching guitars to create one of the most fascinating sounds ever recorded in Brazil. The album kicks off with the raw, energetic “Ponta de Lança Africano,” and from there on it never slows down, but continues to pile up one fiery, funky gem after the other. The samba soul and samba funk scenes of the ’70s in Brazil produced many great artists and many great recordings, fully comparable with the best soul and funk music recorded in the U.S. during the same period. Jorge Ben was the most prominent figure of this scene and África Brasil is probably the most famous of his ’70s recordings. For any person who is interested in the music of Jorge Ben, or indeed Brazilian funk in general, there is no better sample of it than África Brasil.

1 Ponta de Lanca Africano (Umbabarauma)
2 Hermes Trimegisto Escreveu
3 O Filosofo
4 Meus Filhos, Meu Tesouro
5 O Plebeu
6 Taj Mahal
7 Xica da Silva
8 Historia de Jorge
9 Camisa 10 da Gavea
10 Cavaleiro Do Cavalo Imaculado
11 África Brasil (Zumbi)

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password: vibes

Clara Nunes – Claridade (1975)

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CLARA NUNES
Claridade
Released 1975

1-O mar serenou (Candeia)
2-Sofrimento de quem ama (Alberto Lonato)
3-A deusa dos Orixás (Toninho – Romildo)
4-Juizo final (Élcio Soares – Nelson Cavaquinho)
5-Tudo é ilusão (Tufy Lauar – Eden Silva – Anibal da Silva)
6-Valsa de realejo (Guinga – Paulo César Pinheiro
7-Bafo de boca (Paulo César Pinheiro – João Nogueira)
😯 último bloco (Candeia)
9-Ninguém tem que achar ruim (Ismael Silva)
10-Às vezes faz bem chorar (Ivor Lancellotti)
11-Vai amor (W.Rosa – Monarco)
12-Que seja bem feliz (Cartola)

I am in love with Clara Nunes, who left us far too early at the age of 39. Her voice just instantly puts me in a better place, no matter what is going on or where I am. There’s not too many people I can say that about, not even Elis Regina, whose own turmoil bubbles beneath the passionate surface of her recorded works in a way that the attuned ear can pick up on fairly quickly. While Regina’s music is often playful, joyous, even transcendent, there is also a deep melancholy. Not so for Clara Nunes, whose saddest songs are still somehow cheerful. Perhaps it was her strong spirituality grounded in Candomblé, which after all is at the roots of samba. She shares this optimism, even when tearful, with those samba composers whose work she so lovingly committed to wax — Candeia, Monarco, Cartola: some of the great poets of the Portuguese language and masters of melodic subtlety. Clara Nunes opened the way for a host of sambistas (female samba singers) of the “samba revival” of the 1970s like Alcione and Beth Carvalho. Clara’s earliest recordings honestly do not do much for me. But she really hit her artistic stride in the early 70s, probably peaking with 1974’s “Alvorecer”. This album, Claridade, follows that one and while it might not be quite the milestone that Alvorecer was, it is still one of her strongest records, consistent in the quality of its arrangements, production, performance, and of coarse, Clara’s sonorous, soaring voice.

Clara Nunes “Claridade” (EMI-Odeon, 1975)
A lovely, solid ’70s style samba album, with lovely, clear melodies and — oh! — that heavenly voice! A swirly string section kicks in on the end of Side One, but it hardly gets in the way… Basically this is yet another fine album, with songs by all the usual crowd — Nelson Cavaquinho, Monarco, Candeia and Cartola. She slows down on a couple of tunes, and these ballads add a little variety to the mix. Recommended!

Biografia
Trabalhava numa fábrica quando resolveu participar do concurso A Voz de Ouro ABC, em que foi vencedora na etapa mineira e terceiro lugar na final, em São Paulo, em 1959. A partir de então conseguiu um emprego em uma rádio de Belo Horizonte e se apresentava em casas noturnas da cidade. Em 1965 mudou-se para o Rio de Janeiro, onde gravou seu primeiro disco, com repertório de boleros e sambas-canções. Depois de alguns álbus ainda com gênero indefinido, firmou-se no samba nos anos 70. Em 74, seu LP vendeu cerca de 300 mil cópias, graças ao sucesso do samba “Conto de Areia” (Romildo/ Toninho). Fio um recorde para a época, que rompeu com o tabu de que cantora não vendia discos e estimulou outras gravadoras que investissem em sambistas (mulheres) como Alcione, que gravou seu primeiro LP em 75 e Beth Carvalho, que transferiu-se para uma grande fábrica, a RCA, em 76. Os discos que se seguiram a transformaram em uma das três rainhas do samba dos anos 80, ao lado das outras duas referidas intérpretes. Clara gravou desde sambas-enredos até composições de Caymmi e Chico Buarque. Na segunda metade da década, lançou um disco por ano, todos com grandes vendas e gravações históricas, como as de “Juízo Final” (Nelson Cavaquinho/ Élcio Soares), “Coração Leviano” (Paulinho da Viola) e “Morena de Angola” (Chico Buarque). Ficou famosa também por suas canções calcadas em temas do Candomblé, sua religião, e por sua indumentária caracaterística, sempre de branco e com colares e missangas de origem africana. Morreu prematuramente após uma cirurgia malsucedida, causando consternação popular. Outros sucessos: “Você Passa e Eu Acho Graça” (Ataulfo Alves/Carlos Imperial), “Ê Baiana”, “Ilu Ayê – Terra da Vida”, “Tristeza, Pé no Chão” (Armando Gonçalves Mamâo), “A Deusa dos Orixás”, “Macunaíma”, “O Mar Serenou” (Candeia), “As Forças da Natureza” (João Nogueira/ Paulo César Pinheiro), “Guerreira”, “Feira de Mangaio” (Sivuca/ Glorinha Gadelha), “Portela na Avenida” (Mauro Duarte/ Paulo César Pinheiro), “Nação” (João Bosco/ Aldir Blanc)

Carmen Miranda, for Caymmi (1914-2008)

Well, I wanted to make a tribute to Dorival Caymmi, the tower of Brazilian song who passed away yesterday in Rio at 94 years of age. But until I have time to do vinyl rips, I found I had nothing to share that isn’t available over at Loronix, where you will also find a very nice post remembering Caymmi with some wonderful quotations from notables who have been deeply affected and influenced by the man and his music.

Instead I’ve chosen a different approach by posting some music I think he would have liked to listen to along with us, from a woman who was very important to putting his career in the spotlight early on – Carmen Miranda. This is a collection of her recordings from 1930 to 1945, and while it doesn’t feature any of Caymmi’s music it does feature songs from his colleague Ary Barroso as well as titles from Luiz Peixoto, Andre Filho, and Assis Valente. Highly recommended for understanding why Carmen was a huge star in Brazil before Hollywood got hold of her.

CARMEN MIRANDA
Carmen Miranda (1930-1945)
Released on Harlequin Records, 1997

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1 Iaiá, Ioiô 3:10 José Barros
2 Pra Você Gostar de Mim (Taí) 3:20
3 Quero Ver Você Chorar 3:19
4 Dona Balbina 2:57 (José Barros)
5 Cuidado Hein! 2:42 (Andre Filho)
6 Malandro 2:37 (Andre Filho)
7 Moleque Indigesto 3:00 (Lamartine Babo)
8 Um Pouquinho… 3:29
9 Na Batucada da Vida 3:43 (Ary Barroso, Luís Peixoto )
10 Mamãe Não Quer 2:06
11 Elogio da Raça 3:18 (Assis Valente)
12 Pra Quem Sabe Dar Valor 2:58 (Assis Valente)
13 Amor! Amor! 3:03
14 Eu Quero Casar Com Você 2:08 (Andre Filho)
15 Minha Deusa Partiu 2:49 (Ary Barroso)
16 Balance
17 Minha Terra Tem Palmeiras 2:30
18 Boneca de Piche 3:20 (Ary Barroso)
19 Salada Mista 3:15 (Ary Barroso)
20 A Pensão da Dona Stella 2:57 (Oswaldo Santiago, Paulo Barbosa)
21 Cuidado Com a Gaita Do Ary 2:41 (Oswaldo Santiago, Paulo Barbosa)
22 Voltei Pro Morro 2:52
23 Tico-Tico No Fubá 2:36 (Luís Peixoto)

One can immediately feel the difference between this and Harlequin’s earlier release The Brazilian Recordings. The CD kicks off with a type of syncopated pop jazz whose most Brazilian element is the language. This might disappoint some, but it’s good pop jazz. The lion’s share of this CD comes from the period before Carmen joined forces with Bando da Lua, the excellent band who joined her when she went to the US. That is not to say that this album is all pop jazz material. Within a few tracks, it’s firmly in uniquely Brazilian territory. By virtue of it being earlier material, one can hear different instrumentation than when Carmen was performing with Bando da Lua. Some feature jazz band orchestra, some small Brazilian combo of guitar, flute and percussion, others a hybrid of popular jazz band instruments and a Brazilian batucada section. Brazil has long been a font of such syncretism and it’s immensely enjoyable as exemplified in the tracks on this collection. One of the more curious tracks is “Minha deusa partiu.” Carmen cannot be obviously heard in this song but it swings, even sporting a Mills Brothers-like bit of instrument imitation. One wishes for more details about the actual recording session and side artists, but perhaps records don’t exist for this. With the explosion of interest in all Brazilian music from bossa nova to tropicalismo, it’s time to examine the undeserved reputation of Carmen Miranda as a sellout and let the recordings speak for themselves. ~ Megan Lynch, All Music Guide

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