Clementina de Jesus – Marinheiro Só (1973)

clementina,samba

Marinheiro só
Released 1973

1 Marinheiro só (Caetano Veloso)

2 Na linha do mar (Paulinho da Viola)

3 Madrugada (Antônio Motta – B. Miranda)

4 Sai de baixo (Eduardo Marques)

5 Taratá (Folclore adpt – Clementina de Jesus)

6 Essa nega pede mais (Paulinho da Viola)

7 Moro na roça (Zagaia – Folclore adpt – Xangô da Mangueira)

8 Cinco cantos religiosos:
• Oração de Mãe Menininha (Dorival Caymmi)
• Fui pedir às almas santas (Arr. Adpt. Clementina de Jesus)
• Atraca, atraca (Arr. Adpt. Clementina de Jesus)
• Incelença (Arr. Adpt. Clementina de Jesus)
• Abaluaiê (Waldemar Henrique)

9 Marinheiro só (Caetano Veloso)
• Me dá o meu boné (Padeirinho)
===============================================

“Marinheiro só” is an amazing samba record from the early 70s. Leading off with the Caetano Veloso song of the same name, it is start to finish an engaging listen. There are two tracks from Paulinho da Viola — “Na linha do mar” and “Essa nega pede mais” — and one from Caymmi included in the a medley of religious songs. The whole album is gold, but of particular note is this 12-minute suite of religious songs that celebrates sambas roots in candomblé and umbanda. It is recorded, performed, and presented in a way that communicates the feeling of a ‘terreiro’ (place of worship for Afro-Brazilian religious ceremony). A landmark record that brings some feeling of the old guard to the new 70s samba revival.

*note: This upload is taken from a 2 for 1 that includes “Gente de antiga,” which will be coming here soon. Because of this the track numbers run from 13 to 21.

Clementina de Jesus – Marinheiro Só (1973)320 kbs

Clementina de Jesus – Marinheíro So (1973) [FLAC]

Nelson Cavaquinho – Nelson Cavaquinho (1973)

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1973
Odeon
SMOFB 3809

1 Juizo final

(Élcio Soares – Nelson Cavaquinho)

2 Folhas secas

(Guilherme de Brito – Nelson Cavaquinho)

3 Caminhando

(Nourival Bahia – Nelson Cavaquinho)

4 Minha festa

(Guilherme de Brito – Nelson Cavaquinho)

5 Mulher sem alma

(Guilherme de Brito – Nelson Cavaquinho)

6 Vou partir

(Jair Costa – Nelson Cavaquinho)

7 Rei vadio

(Joaquim – Nelson Cavaquinho)

8 A flor e o espinho

(Alcides Caminha – Guilherme de Brito – Nelson Cavaquinho)
• Se eu sorrir (Nelson Cavaquinho-Guilherme de Brito)
• Quando eu me chamar saudade (Nelson Cavaquinho-Guilherme de Brito)
• Pranto de poeta (Nelson Cavaquinho-Guilherme de Brito)

9 É tão triste cair

(Nelson Cavaquinho)

10 Pode sorrir

(Guilherme de Brito – Nelson Cavaquinho)

11 Rugas

(Garcêz – Ary Monteiro – Nelson Silva)

12 O bem e o mal

(Guilherme de Brito – Nelson Cavaquinho)

13 Visita triste

(Anatalicio – Guilherme de Brito – Nelson Cavaquinho)

nelson cavaquinhonelson cavaquinho

Nelson Antônio da Silva, aka Nelson Cavaquinho. October 28, 1911 – February 17, 1986

“My voice, you know, is really raspy. But…. what is the name of that guy over there in North America? Ah, Armstrong is also raspy. There are people who like my voice more than many other singers. I don’t know why, but I think its because I feel it. There are singers that have killed my music. I have feeling when I sing.”

-from an interview with Sergio Cabral on the album’s back cover

Nelson Cavaquinho’s amazing gift for memorable melody meant that there was never any shortage of famous artists wanting to record his sambas. Just a glance at the jacket of this one and you see a quick handful, tunes that are better-known if not immortalized in the sweet tones of Clara Nunes, Elis Regina, Elza Soares, Elizeth Cardoso… Surely Nelson was not talking about THEM when he referred to people “killing” his songs. Pelo amor de deus, he couldn’t have been!

Whoever he might have had in mind, his point is well-taken. There is something about his songs, and maybe just samba in general, that particularly suits it to being sung by grissled old men and women. And I say that with love in my heart, of course. Nelson, who carried Cartola’s coffin at his funeral, did not have the sweetened vintage pipes of his close friend. His is more of a croak, but nonetheless endearing for it.

This 1973 record is a classic. It has made the rounds on the ‘blogosphere’ but I like it too much not to share it here, with my own rip of ‘primera qualidade’. The dynamic Odeon duo of Milton Miranda and Maestro Gaya are in the production seats on this one too. Guilherme de Brito, who had taken up his place as Nélson’s main songwriting partner at this point, sings on the medley of songs on Track 8. It’s also worth noting that Nélson plays guitar on the record, and *not* cavaquinho, which he more or less quit playing fairly early on. Nicknames tend to stick, I guess.

A lot of the highlights of this album have been recorded by other artists as well – Juizo Final, Folhas Secas, Vou Partir are especially well-represented songs in the broader samba discography.

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Nelson Cavaquinho and Cartola, 1963, Carnaval in Rio. Photo by Walter Firmo

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Jackson do Pandeiro – O Cabra da Peste (1966)

jackson
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Jackson do Pandeiro
“O Cabra da Peste”

Original release: 1966, “Jackson do Pandeiro – O Cabra da Peste”, Continental, PPL 12265)

Censored release: 1969

reissue: 1978, “Jackson do Pandeiro – O Cabra da Peste – Edição Limitada”, Popular/GE/Continental, 146411047)

This pressing, Warner/Continental CD, 2001 (092741523-2)

01. Capoeira mata um (Alvaro Castilho – De Castro) Balanço
02. Tá roendo (Figueirôa – Maruim) Samba
03. A ordem é samba (Jackson do Pandeiro – Severino Ramos) Samba
04. Pinicapau (Codó) Baião
05. Forró quentinho (Almira Castilho) Forró
06. Bodocongó (HUmberto Teixeira – Cicero Nunes) Baião
07. Secretária do diabo (Osvaldo Oliveira – Reinaldo Costa) Forró
08. Vou sambalançar (Antonio Barros – Jackson do Pandeiro) Samba
09. Alegria do vaqueiro (Zé Katraca) Baião
10. Forró do Biá (Luiz Moreno – Jeronimo) Forró
11. Papai vai de trem (Ivo Martins – Jackson do Pandeiro) Baião

DELETED TRACK between tracks 10 and 11 above, Polícia Feminina (Severino Ramos – José Pereira) Forró

What a confusing release history this album has had, which utter lack of any information whatsoever on the CD reissue fails to clear up. This is what I was I have been able to piece together for you: “O Cabra da Peste” was released in 1966 (sometimes listed as 1963, which I originally fell for but was thankfully corrected about), censored and re-released without the song “Polícia Feminina” in 1969, then reissued again in limited edition in 1978, from which I suspect this album cover at the top was taken. I am not sure what is meant by the text under the photo, “rerecording with a new cover,” unless they consider the removal of one track to be a rerecording. Or perhaps by 78 they decided to put “Polícia Feminina” (a fairly innocuous and silly song about having your heart locked up in prison, etc) back on the album…. Whatever the case may be, the CD issue is still missing the track. The recording is in mono, so we can at least be glad they didn’t use a version “electronically rechannelled for stereo”…

Jackson do Pandeiro recorded a ton of hit songs that are very important for Brazilian popular music. None of those are on here. (You might, however, want to visit the previous post of O Rei do Ritmo on this site..). I read one review of this album, in Portuguese, that criticized the song selection as being the weakest of any album from Jackson’s career.. Well, if that’s true, I am still pretty impressed by this record and it only shows just how much of a genius this guy to give these tunes so much life. It’s a solid set of forró, samba, and samba de coco. And although there might not be anything that immediately has you singing along like many of his better-known releases, there are some real stand-out cuts here. “Capoeira mata um” totally kicks off right. “A ordém é samba” written by Jackson and and Severino Ramos, and “Bodocongó″ by Humberto Teixeira e Cícero Nunes are catchy tunes and hot performances, showing just how easily Jackson could interpret a variety of styles and have it still come out like, well, Jackson do Pandeiro. One difference between material from this era and his earlier 1950s successes can be found in the suingue (or, swing) of the rhythm section — the influence of bossa nova is felt in the way the drummer lays down some jazzed-out chops on even the forró numbers. While this might not be the place to start for people new to Jackson do Pandeiro, this a fine album on its own. It makes me happy.

Links removed and post bumped

Novos Baianos – Vamos Pro Mundo (1974)

baianos

1 Vamos pro mundo (Galvão – Pepeu Gomes)

2 Guria (Galvão – Moraes Moreira)

3 Na cadência do samba (Paulo Gesta – Ataulfo Alves)

4 Tangolete (Galvão – Moraes Moreira)

5 América tropical (Pepeu Gomes – Moraes Moreira)

6 Chuvisco (Pepeu Gomes – Moraes Moreira)

7 Escorrega sebosa (Paulinho Boca de Cantor – Galvão – Moraes Moreira)

8 Ô menina (Galvão – Pepeu Gomes – Moraes Moreira)

9 Um dentro do outro (Jorginho – Pepeu Gomes)

10 Um bilhete pra Didi (Jorginho)

11 Preta pretinha no carnaval (Galvão – Moraes Moreira)

One look at the album cover, and you know that all is not well here…..

As somebody who was previously only familiar with their first few albums, one of them being the “most important Brazilian album” according to Brazilian Rolling Stone, I have to say that this album leaves me frustrated, if not quite cold.

It is sad to admit this but it took almost a whole listen to realize what is sorely missing from this record — Moraes Moreira! Although he has writing credit on it, he is not playing or singing on the album.

To give you the succinct low-down: This feels like HALF a great album to me, which is what makes the non-great half so frustrating. Literally half the record is instrumental, and while they are undoubtedly all talented players, this material seems largely inspired to me, as if they had run out of songs and just needed to fill up the other half o the record. But if you like jamming-for-the-sake-of-it type stuff, this album could make your day, who know?

The first four songs are all excellent, particularly the second track Guria which is simply gorgeous. Baby Consuelo is in fine form on these and her energy only increases my desire to make out with her in 1974. The fourth track Tangolete sees the Baianos taking up their rockier side, with Paulo Boca de Cantor singing. From this point on, things get more and more uneven. The instrumental ‘America Tropical’ sounds the band doing their best Santana impression, followed IMMEDIATELY by another instrumental (whose sequencing idea was *that*?), the acoustic choro-flavored “Chuvisco.” The next two tracks are delicious — the jazzy post-bossa acoustic laid backness of Escorrega Sebosa winds up with a little coda of samba de roda (hey i made a rhyme!), and thes stylized samba canção of ‘Ô Menina’ once again makes me pine for nutty Baby Consuelo. Then, if you are like me, you will find yourself turning the album off after this track as the last 12 or 13 minutes takes a serious nosedive into mediocrity. Two more BACK TO BACK instrumentals (really now, what were they thinking?), complete with dueling guitars and a gratuitous drum solo …. Zzzzzzzz. Um Dentro do Outro is the more interesting of the two, slightly funky, slighly progged-out ensemble playing; but the second, Um Bilhete para Didi, is just irritating to me, although it does have what appears to be a bowed bass solo in the middle of it. I remember hearing this track as an Mp3 years ago and thinking it was pretty cool, but at this point I… just don’t. And then the clincher — an abominable version of Preta Pretinha played in hyperdrive trio electrico style, here called “Preta Pretinha no Carnaval”.

I wish I knew the story about why Moraes Moreira has writing credits on half the songs (even the lackluster instrumentals) but then left the band for a while. In any event, it does confirm his place at the center of what made the magic happen. For even when this album is good — and I do think the highlights I’ve mentioned here ARE quite good – they still lack a certain energy, cohesiveness, and inspiration that they had going earlier. Of course by 1974 the hippie lifestyle was wearing down a lot of bands, so the Baianos aren’t exactly an exception.

This album, on the whole, confirms my belief that when (non-jazz) bands start putting drum solos on their studio albums, they are basically running out of ideas…

Still this is a worthy addition to any Brazilian music collection and especially anyone who likes Novos Baianos.

Novos Baianos – Vamos Pro Mundo (1974) in FLAC LOSSLESS

Novos Baianos – Vamos Pro Mundo (1974) in 320kbs mp3

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Nara Leão, Chico Buarque, Maria Bethania – Quando o Carnaval Chegar (1972)

nara chico

Nara Leão, Chico Buarque, and Maria Bethania
“Quando o Carnaval Chegar”
Original film soundtrack
released in 1972
This pressing Universal/Mercury 04228264112

1 Mambembe (Instrumental)
(Chico Buarque)

2 Baioque (Chico Buarque)
Interpretação: Maria Bethânia

3 Caçada (Chico Buarque)
Interpretação: Chico Buarque

4 Mais uma estrela

(Bonfiglio de Oliveira – Herivelto Martins)
Interpretação: Nara Leão

5 Quando o carnaval chegar (Chico Buarque)
Interpretação: Chico Buarque

6 Minha embaixada chegou (Assis Valente)
Interpretação: Maria Bethânia / Nara Leão

7 Soneto (Instrumental)
(Chico Buarque)

8 Mambembe (Chico Buarque)
Interpretação: Chico Buarque

9 Soneto (Chico Buarque)
Interpretação: Nara Leão

10 Partido alto
(Chico Buarque)
Interpretação: MPB-4

11 Bom conselho (Chico Buarque)
Interpretação: Maria Bethânia

12 Frevo (Tom Jobim – Vinicius de Moraes)
Interpretação: Chico Buarque

13 Formosa
(J.Rui – Nássara)
Interpretação: Maria Bethânia / Nara Leão

14 Cantores de rádio (Alberto Ribeiro – João de Barro – Lamartine Babo)
Interpretação: Chico Buarque / Maria Bethânia / Nara Leão

Film Credits

Ficha Técnica:
Título Original: Quando o Carnaval Chegar
Gênero: Musical
Duração: 98 min.
Lançamento (Brasil): 1972
Distribuição: Livio Bruni
Direção: Cacá Diegues
Roteiro: Cacá Diegues, Hugo Carvana e Chico Buarque
Produção: Cacá Diegues, Zelito Viana e Mapa Filmes
Música: Chico Buarque
Fotografia: Dib Lutfi
Figurino: Fernando Bede
Edição: Eduardo Escorel

Elenco:
Chico Buarque de Hollanda (Paulo)
Nara Leão (Mimi)
Maria Bethânia (Rosa)
Hugo Carvana (Lourival)
Antonio Pitanga (Cuíca)
Ana Maria Magalhães (Virgínia)
José Lewgoy (Anjo)
Elke Maravilha
Wilson Grey
Luiz Alves
Odete Lara
Vera Manhães
Scarlet Moon
Joaquim Mota
Zeni Pereira
—————————————————-

I don’t know much about this film, or the involvement of Nara, Chico, and Maria in it. I do know that Nara Leão was married to Carlos Diegues during this time. They all acted it in, and there were appearances by other notables like Odette Lara. Chico is credited with helping out on the script (he’s a renowned novelist too at this point, for those who don’t know). In fact this is essentially a Chico Buarque record. It contains other material released elsewhere. Particularly noteworthy is the unbelievably catchy “Partido Alto” which is the stand-out track for me, the one that sticks in your memory. Performed by the group MPB-4, it was in fact written by Buarque.

I did, however, find this synopsis of the film:
—————————————————————————————
O empresário de um grupo de cantores sem sucesso, lhes consegue um contrato para que se apresentem em homenagem a um rei que chegará à cidade para o Carnaval. Discussões internas, romances inesperados e defecções impedem que o espetáculo se realize. Mas os artistas voltam a se juntar, apresentando-se em shows mambembes.

Flabber translation:

The manager of a group of unsuccessful singers secures a contract for them to present a show in homage to a king when he arrives to the city for Carnaval. Internal debates, unexpected romances, dissent and defections impede the realization of the show. But the artists come together and join as one, and put on spectacular minstrel shows.

————————————————————————————-

Hmmm…. Haven’t seen this film, but it sounds like it belongs to a long tradition of films with great soundtracks (Superfly, The Harder They Come, Shaft, any Quinten Tarantino film): the music is the high point, and perhaps the only reason to see it.. I could be wrong though, maybe someone who has seen it can correct me. But one thing is certain, it seems like they were having a good time on the set…

Meet Chico Buarque, international man of letters…
chico dude

*Flabbergasted Vibes does not condone the use of illicit mind-altering substances.

Nara, Chico, and Maria – Quando o Carnaval Chegar (1972) in 320kbs

Nara, Chico and Maria – Quando o Carnaval Chegar (1972) in FLAC LOSSLESS AUDIO

senha / pass in comments

Paulinho da Viola – 2 for 1 (1971)

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Record #1 called Paulinho da Viola released in 1971

01 – Perder e ganhar
02 – Sol e pedra
03 – Dona Santina e Seu Antenor
04 – Para um amor no Recife
05 – Mal de amor
06 – Depois da vida
07 – Moemá Morenou
08 – Oculos Escuros
09 – Cuidado, teu orgulho te mata
10 – Lenço
11 – O acaso não tem pressa
12 – Um certo dia para 21

Paulinho da Viola – Vocals, guitar, cavaquinho
Flute and Clarinet: Copinha
Rhythm and percussion: Elton Medeiros, Marçal and OScar
Drums: Elizeu, Juquinha
Bass: Dininho
Trombone: Norato
cornet: Maurilio

Produced by Milton Miranda
Musical director and orchestrator: Lindolfo Gaya
Technical director: Z.J. Merky
Recording technicians: Jorge and Nivaldo

Cover photo: Geraldo Guimarães

Record #2 called Paulinho da Viola released in 1971….

13 – Num samba curto
14 – Pressentimento
15 – Para ver as meninas
16 – Nas ondas da noite
17 – Filosofia do samba
18 – Consumir e viver
19 – Lapa em três tempos – Abre a janela
20 – Coraçao
21 – Minha vez de sorrir
22 – Reclamação
23 – Abracando Chico Soares
24 – Vinhos finos… cristais

Paulinho da Viola, 1971 #2
Musicians uncredited but probably much the same as #1, except who played te harpsichord!!
Produced by Milton Miranda
Musical director: Lyrio Panicali
Arrangements and orchestration: Maestro Gaya
Technical Director: Z.J. Merky
Recording engineers: Jorge ann Nivaldo

Cover photo: Marisa Alves de Lima

*************************************************************************************

I’ve been wavering back and forth on whether to share this here. Not because of the music – these two records are absolute classics, no problems there! But I do not know who mastered these 2-for-1 Paulinho pressings, and to my ears this is definitely NOT the work of Peter Mew at Abbey Road, who gave such a loving treatment to Paulinho’s catalog in the mid 90s as well as others like Milton Nascimento’s classic records (the good ones..) and non-Brazilian but personal favorite Kevin Ayers. Although music freaks and audiophiles are prone to disagreement over remasters, I find Peter Mew’s work to be some of the best out there, very gentle, maintaining dynamic range, and doing very LITTLE to the original recording. To my ears this 2-for-1, while it doesn’t sound terrible, sounds harsher and more compressed than Mew’s work in general and his work with Paulinho in particular. The careful listener will notice some distortion and modulation in places, and that is a sure sign of an assembly-line style rush job. So, I have been meaning to replace this disc with the individual releases. But not knowing who did the mastering for certain on THIS pressing has kept me from doing that — whoever it is, they are not credited.

BUT — as many of you are now probably saying to yourself, for @#$%’s sake its the music that matters, right? But of course. Even Charles Gavin couldn’t mess up these records (although I’m sure he would give it his best shot). Two records released in 1971 showing Paulinho at the height of his powers, still young and drinking at the font of the Portela samba school. “Pelo Amor em Recife” is one of his best-known compositions; I was lucky enough to hear him perform it IN Recife (well, Olinda actually, but they’re literally connected to each other). With other classics like “Mal de amor” and “Oculos escuros,” there is not a dull moment on this album. “Moemá morenou” is another classic, a samba-de-roda penned with his friend and frequent partner Elton Madeiros. This whole record is more of a classic, straight-up samba recording, and to speak more of production – everything is clear as a bell, especially Paulinho’s voice which is like crystal but does not dominate the balance, rather sitting nicely just barely on top of the instrumentation.

The next album from 1971 is a bit more of an elaborate affair. Immediately you know you are in different territory when you hear the chiming notes of a harpsichord tinkling your samba. Even if you detest harpsichord (I have heard of such people, although I do not quite understand hating an entire instrument), you have to credit Paulinho for a characteristically modest innovation and expansion of his sonic palette. A lot of this record has some post-bossa nova ensemble arrangements that make the record perhaps more “modern”-sounding than his release from earlier in the year, although hinted at on that record with the track “Cuidade, teu orgulho te mata” (Be careful, your pride will kill you…) . “Para ver as meninas” is yet another amazing samba-canção ballad, with what appear to be castinettes in the right channel yet are more likely to be somebody playing a box of matches (samba is excellent at improvising anything around your house into a percussion instrument) and — yet again — harpsichord in the left channel playing modal variations on the melody. This song was, unfortunately, covered by over-rated chanteuse Marisa Monte, but don’t let that keep you away. It is a great song. “Filosofia do samba” is a very famous composition by Candeia (another Portela luminary) and here Paulinho gives it a more than worthy interpretation, perhaps the best version committed to tape. “Consumir e viver” sees Paulinho moving into Samba-Rock territory, something of a rarity to hear him approaching a song with a swinging backbeat worthy of any Jorge Ben (that is Jorge Ben from the mid-1960s; by 1973 Ben had moved on to making amazing records with esoteric lyrics about alchemists and aliens..). “Reclamação” also works the same ground, although a bit more on a heavy bossa nova tip. The material on this second album is on the whole not as strong and memorable as the first, but then that is sort of an unfair comparison — this first album from 1971 is one of the high points of his entire career. one strange thing I noticed, even if you start this disc at track 13 (where the 2nd of the two begins), by the end of it you may find yourself with listening fatigue. Again, this is a direct consequence of the mastering, and further evidence that it was not Peter Mew’s work… I’ll get to the bottom of this mystery yet!