Manu Dibango – Soul Makossa (1972) {African Mix}

Manu Dibango
“Soul Makossa” 1972

This pressing – MusiDisc, France, 331442

1. Soul Makossa
2. Lily
3. Dangwa “Three Points”
4. O Boso
5. New Bell “Hard Pulsation”
6. Nights in Zeralda
7. Hibiscus

This is the original mix of the famous “Soul Makossa” album from Manu Dibango, loaned to me by a dear friend who tells me this was mix used for the African market, with the drums and percussion mixed higher than the version released in Europe during the 1970s. The huge single from this album (released before the LP) launched Dibango’s international career and spawned many cover versions around the world. Although the tray card lists a 1969 copyright, I can’t find any information on the interwebs (which are all-knowing and wise) to back that up, so I am listing it here under its more common release date which was 1972. I could be persuaded otherwise. But the style of production does seem more like early-70s to me — a lot was changing in the studio-world during this time, and 69 seems too early for a lot of the material on this record. The second cut, “Lily” could easily have been produced in ’69, so perhaps some of this record was assembled from tracks recorded at different times. Anyone with detailed information please leave a comment. There have been a number of different pressings on vinyl and CD, some of which have as many as 13 tracks on them, so its all very confusing. Although it lacks specific information on this title, there is a very nice discography of Manu Dibango over at the lovely Soundological Investigations blog.

———————————story of “The Song”——————————————-
“Soul Makossa” is a 1972 single by Cameroonian makossa saxophonist Manu Dibango. It is often cited as one of the first disco records.[2] In 1972 David Mancuso found a copy in a Brooklyn West Indian record store and often played it at his Loft parties.[3] The response was so positive that the few copies of “Soul Makossa” in New York City were quickly bought up.[3] The song was subsequently played heavily by Frankie Crocker, who DJed at WBLS, then New York’s most popular black radio station.[3] Since the original was now unfindable, at least 23 groups quickly released cover versions to capitalize on the demand for the record.[3] Atlantic eventually licensed the song from the French record label Fiesta.[3] Their release of it peaked at #35 on the Billboard chart in 1973; in 1999 Dave Marsh wrote that it was “the only African record by an African” to crack the top 40.[4] At one point there were nine different versions of the song in the Billboard chart.[5] It became “a massive hit” internationally as well.[5]

“Soul Makossa” was originally recorded as a B-side for “Mouvement Ewondo,” a song about Cameroon’s association football team.[5]

It is probably best remembered for the chanted vocal refrain “Mama-ko, mama-sa, ma-ka-ma-ko-ssa”, which was also used in Michael Jackson’s 1982 “Wanna Be Startin’ Somethin'” (albeit in a different key with a not-so-monophonic melody) during the song’s final bridge. It is also sampled in the hip hop song “Face Off” by artist Jay-Z on his album In My Lifetime, Vol. 1 as well as the single “Don’t Stop the Music” by Rihanna. The song is also sampled on the intro to The Carnival, Wyclef Jean’s first solo album. The phrase “ma ma say ah, ma ma coo sah” also appears in the fourth verse of the song “Rhythm (Devoted to the Art of Moving Butts)” by A Tribe Called Quest, and in “Mama Say,” the debut single by the Bloodhound Gang. “Makossa” means “(I) dance” in Duala, a Cameroonian language.[6]
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Credits

* Arranged by Manu Dibango
* Written by Manu Dibango
* Bass by Long Manfred
* Drums by Joby Jobs
* Electric guitar by Manu Rodanet
* Percussion by Freddy Mars
* Piano by Georges Arvanitas, Patrice Galas
* Acoustic guitar by Pierre Zogo
References

1. ^ Manu Dibango discography on Discogs.com
2. ^ The History of Rock Music – The Seventies
3. ^ a b c d e Shapiro, Peter. Turn the Beat Around: the Secret History of Disco. New York: Faber and Faber, Inc., 2005., 35.
4. ^ Marsh, Dave. “The Heart of Rock and Soul: The 1001 Greatest Singles Ever Made”. Da Capo Press, 1999., 548
5. ^ a b c Broughton, Simon; Mark Ellingham (2000). World Music: The Rough Guide. Rough Guides. p. 441.
6. ^ TRANS Nr. 13: George Echu (Yaounde): Multilingualism as a Resource: the Lexical Appropriation of Cameroon Indigenous Languages by English and French
7. ^ Billboard Pop Charts Allmusic.com
8. ^ R&B Billboard. Allmusic.com.

Includes full artwork in 600 dpi as TIF, m3u, log, cue, and a tasty yam dish in honor of Mother Africa.

VA – Nigerian Disco Funk Special: The Sound of the Underground Lagos Dancefloor 1974-79 (2008)

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While not as compelling as the 2-disc “Nigeria Special” collection, this is a righteous set of songs in its own right. There are actually some weaker cuts on this one, especially for those whose tastes run like Clint Striker who said “I’m not really into all that wah-wah guitar stuff.” Maybe the problem is that the collection kicks off with its strongest cut, “Take Your Soul” (1976) from The Sahara All Stars of Jos.” The momentum of the rest of the album just never quite reaches those heights again. Tracks like the seriously-flanged “Lagos City” (1976) from Asiko Rock Group, and the closer, Afro-beatish “Love Affair” (1976) by SJOB Movement, keep the stew simmering. “Greetings” (1978) from Joni Hastruup — which manages to be both the most melodic cut here and also one of the funkiest, with some tight riffing on sax, flute, and Rhodes that match Joni’s stident voice. — keep it interesting in between some of the more monochromatic jams here. It’s probably my favorite track on this compilation. The sound quality varies between the tracks here, no doubt due to most if not all of these tracks being sourced from vinyl, but if you are seeking stuff like this out then you probably won’t care much about that. If this doesn’t quite reach the same level as Soundway’s other Nigerian compilations, its only because they set such a high benchmark with them.

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From CD Universe
Nigerian music is known for its polyglot character, a fact that is exemplified by its native juju and highlife–a perfect storm of indigenous music traditions bolstered by Western technology. Lesser-known are Nigerian attempts to adopt Western trends wholesale, as with the exquisitely rare disco and funk groups compiled for NIGERIA DISCO FUNK SPECIAL: THE SOUND OF THE UNDERGROUND LAGOS DANCEFLOOR 1974-1979. Taking obvious cues from stateside horn-driven funk ensembles like B.T. Express, Ohio Players and the J.B.’s, the propulsive dancefloor beats are punctuated by horn blasts and the scratchy, repetitive insistence of rhythm guitars–a sound with distinctive echoes of the ringing melodicism of highlife guitar sections. Highlights on this funky slice of Afro-disco include: Asikos’s “Lagos City,” an energetic blast of African brass, and Dr. Adolf Ahanotu’s “Ijere,” a slick, overdriven funk number done in a distinctly Nigerian style.

Nigerian musicians adopt ’70s funk and disco in this collection of rarities.Uncut (p.103) – 4 stars out of 5 — “The Afrobeat thunder is still strong on NIGERIA DISCO FUNK SPECIAL….T-Fire could be the Lagos branch of Clinton’s P-Funk family.”

Track Listing

1. Take Your Soul – The Sahara All Stars
2. Will of the People – T-Fire
3. Lagos City – Asiko Rock Group
4. Greetings – Johnny Haastrup
5. You’ve Gotta Help Yourself – The Groovies/Bongos Ikwue
6. Some More – Jay U Experience
7. Mota Ginya – Voices of Darkness
8. Ijere – Dr. Adolf Aonotu
9. Love Affair – S-Job Movement

 in 320kbs

 in FLAC LOSSLESS AUDIO FORMAT

VA – Getting Off: The Seductive Sounds of 70's Adult Cinema (2007)

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I am away from the command center at the Den of Iniquity but the blog cannot stay quiet, so I bring you a post from our contributor KUNG. Rip, scan, and description are all his.

01. L. Hurdle & F. Ricotti – Move On
02. Anton Scott – J.P. Walk (Boogie Nights)
03. Alan Tew – Gentle In The Night
04. Ray Davies – Power Play
05. Unknown – Nude interlude #1 (Kinky Ladies of Bourbon Street)
06. Alan Hawkshaw – Hawkind and fire
07. Brian Bennett – Disco Fever
08. Roger Webb & Keith Grant – The Bends
09. Alan Tew – The Heist
10. Unknown – Nude interlude #2 (Downstairs, Upstairs)
11. Unknown – Carl’s cabana (Inside Seka)
12. Unknown – Fernando’s blues (Come Under My Spell)
13. Unknown – Nude interlude #3 (Do You Wanna Be Loved?)
14. Unknown – Bang ’em hard (Inside Seka)

***
Moviegrooves.com wrote: The Seductive Sounds of 70s Adult Cinema is another porno music compilation – but with a difference; the emphasis is definitely on creating an atmosphere by using the music, with almost no dialogue/moaning/groaning as is the usual deal with porno music comps.

On closer inspection, Getting Off: The Seductive Sounds of 70s Adult Cinema is actually a compilation of genuine (licensed) 70s library music mixed with some music (lifted from DVD) from actual 70s and early 80s porno movies (hey – we did our research, so you don’t have to!), with the library music here having every chance of actually being used in adult movies back in the day.

Whatever – with Getting Off: The Seductive Sounds of 70s Adult Cinema, the guys at Lucky Monkey Records have put together a great little compilation that definitely evokes that sexy 70s porno movie sound! Now where did we put that double-ended dildo?

***
Library music is a term that refers to music that is done by commercial studio musicians and then sold to be used in commercials, b-movies, tv-series etc.

DESCRIPTION BY KUNG:

So today I will share one album from my Porn Groove collection. So, you wonder – why would anybody collect Porn music. Well a couple of years ago dear wifey opened by “accident” my forbidden cupboard and discovered my collection of XXX films. Again and again I tried explaining to her that I enjoy these films only because of the fabulous music in them. So why dont you buy the f@#$%^ CDs instead, she cried. My honest reply was: Its impossible! You must understand they dont release this music on CDs. You gotta get the DVDs. Oh well, I was wrong… And now I have to keep buying these CDs only to prove my love for the music. I will never admit anything else! My whole life is a lie…

VA – GETTING OFF in 320 kbs

VA – GETTING OFF in FLAC Lossless

Tim Maia, Cassiano, Hyldon – Velhos Camaradas (1998)

1 Primavera [Vai Chuva] (Silvio Rochael – Cassiano)
Interpretação: Tim Maia

2 Na sombra de uma árvore (Hyldon) Interpretação: Hyldon

3 De bar em bar (Paulo Zdanowski – Cassiano) Interpretação: Cassiano

4 Réu confesso (Tim Maia)Interpretação: Tim Maia

5 As dores do mundo (Hyldon)Interpretação: Hyldon

6 Salve essa flor (Paulo Zdanowski – Cassiano)Interpretação: Cassiano

7 Coroné Antônio Bento (Luiz Wanderley – João do Vale)Interpretação: Tim Maia

8 Na rua, na chuva, na fazenda [Casinha de sapê] (Hyldon) Interpretação: Hyldon

9 A lua e eu (Paulo Zdanowski – Cassiano)Interpretação: Cassiano

10 Gostava tanto de você (Édson Trindade)Interpretação: Tim Maia

11 Sábado e domingo (Nenem – Hyldon)Interpretação: Hyldon

12 Coleção (Paulo Zdanowski – Cassiano)Interpretação: Cassiano

13 Azul da cor do mar (Tim Maia)Interpretação: Tim Maia

14 Acontecimento (Hyldon)Interpretação: Hyldon

cassianoTim singinghyldon

At first glance at the uninspiring artwork (not this lame collage right above this paragraph, I made that – but the lame CD art), one might think this a rather generic compilation. Until you look a little closer and see that it compiles some of the best work from the path-breaking records of the godfathers of Brazilian soul music — Tim Maia, Cassiano, and Hyldon. The first two were frequent collaborators, with Cassiano being a regular guitarist in Tim’s band and having had many songs recorded by him. When its all said and done this is not only a wonderful introduction to the material by these guys but also a really gratifying listen even for people already familiar with it. It’s well put together, and a lot of this material is unfortunately rather hard to come by. There is a second volume that was released but I don’t have it.

Enjoy this collection of VELHOS CAMARADAS!!

in 320kbs

Blackbyrds – The Blackbyrds / Flying Start (1973/74) 320kbs and FLAC

Thanks to KUNG for this rip of these wonderful two albums issued together. No time for the type of review this deserves, not this week, but you can read the back cover. I’ve just been enjoying this too much lately to keep all the fun to myself. ENJOY! And thanks again Kung!

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flying startblackbyrds tray

Blackbyrds (1973) and Flying Start (1974) at 320kbs

in FLAC…

Gil Scott-Heron & Brian Jackson – Bridges (1977) 320kbs

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Gil Scott-Heron & Brian Jackson
“Bridges”
Released 1977
Japanese CD Reissue

This is one of my favorite records from Gil and Brian, absolutely. At one point I had this idea that I was going to share his entire classic discography from the 70s here, but then I ran out of steam and time. So I decided to jump ahead to this wonderful record. A long and wonderful review is deserved, but I am choosing to keep it brief this time. One memory I have of this record is turning my friend T on to it. Turning T on to music he doesn’t know is pretty difficult – the guy is ten years younger than I am and seems to have five times the musical knowledge, seems to have listened to everything under the sun, and has a pretty amazing collection. So I was rather proud to find a record he didn’t know. At first I just gave him one track, that I consider the centerpiece of the album, “We Almost Lost Detroit.” We were both living in Ann Arbor and T had grown up and spent most of his life in Michigan with family all over the Detroit area. I knew that the song was about stuff that actually went down in the 70s when a nuclear reactor has a partial melt-down and came very close to becoming a 3-Mile Island, and failed to be covered in the press in any significant way. Given the economic, social, and color profile of the city of Detroit, and the neighborhoods where the reactor is located, there is a lot of, um, food for thought here, to put it mildly… But leave it to T to learn what I didn’t know — that the song was titled after a book by the same name, by a John Fuller — which he of course tracked down and read. Guys like him restore my faith in humanity, I swear. Gil is famous for his songs offering pointed commentary on contemporary sociopolitical situations, but what makes this song slightly different than most of those (Johannesburg for example) is that it is not a fist-pumping rally-cry but a sad, mournful, soulful expression of a disaster narrowly averted and the forgotten people in already-devastated cities and ghettos whose lives would have been utterly ruined by it. It’s mellow groove belies the lyrical content, or at least acts as a sort of counterweight that creates tension. And then there is that famous keyboard line of Brian Jackson that has been sampled by a million people, coming at just the right place. Rather than my usual streaming audio sample I am including a link from U-tube, its a bit ‘lossy’ and crappy sounding but that should motivate you to get the real deal below.

1 Hello Sunday! Hello Road!
2 Song of the Wind
3 Racetrack in France
4 Vild (Deaf, Dumb and Blind)
5 Under the Hammer
6 We Almost Lost Detroit Jackson, Scott-Heron
7 Tuskeegee #626
8 Delta Man (Where I’m Comin’ From)
9 95 South (All of the Places We’ve Been)

Aside from this landmark song, the rest of the album is also fantastic, a really solid work that show Gil and Brian beginning a new phase of their prolific partnership.

GIL-SCOTT HERON & BRIAN JACKSON – Bridges (1977) 320kbs

Gil-Scott Heron & Brian Jackson – Bridges (1977) FLAC LOSSLESS
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LINER NOTES

Liner Notes
Brian Jackson and I have been writing music and performing together since 1969. From January of 1970 when we started traveling as the nucleus of a group call “Black & Blues” til now, mid ’77, responses from communities both far and near, have given us an opportunity to take our art to the streets and stages and share it with people we might otherwise never have encountered. Somehow, in even the most distant setting, the warmth and sincerity of the brothers and sisters we have come in contact with, has made us feel at home. Music has been our common denominator; our vehicle; the mutual vibration that gives us a focus, but the ideas and spirit behind the music has been the adhesive and inspiration for continued attempts to communicate.

There is a revolution going on in the world. We are very much a part of it and have a great deal to contribute to the force and direction of this revolution. There are many fronts within this struggle, many far flung outposts geographically isolated and distant from our mainstreams of communication. But everyone who struggles for a better life for oppressed people is an ally who could use any symbol of our concern and solidarity. There is a growing guerrilla movement in Southern Africa, a period of healing and rebuilding in Southeast Asia, a movement towards economic independence in the Caribbean and we are a part of it all. In our own lives the struggle to educate continues: to bring the need for positive change into focus; to bring about
a new understanding of the dynamics of change.

All things change. From the wheel to the automobile. From you, diapers, stuffed animals and bronzed baby shoes, to you in high school, in love, in debt. And the social dynamics and perimeters during your lifetime have exploded into a thousand fragments of liberation movements and human rights demands. It has been a revolution that ignited in the eyes of Asian peasant and African Bushmen and Afro-American Corner Kings who began to direct this inevitable change. It is a revolution in full stride that has changed, irrevocably, our understanding of ourselves in this society as it has demythologized so many of the impressions of black/white, wrong/right that imprisoned us all.

We still believe, as did El Hajj Malik Shabazz (Malcolm X) among others, that America has the potential to undergo a bloodless revolution, in that change may come without pitched battles in the street. But there has already been bloodshed and stains are fresh. It is winter and we are regaining our strength. The key to our progress lies within our ability to support alliances between ourselves and Third World people. The support begins here. In solidarity with chicanos, Puerto Riquenos, Oriental American and Native Americans we will continue to focus on the need for justice and opportunity. We have debts to pays. In the interest of comrades who have contributed their lives, as well as in our own interest.