Freddie Hubbard – Backlash (1967) 320 kbs


Thanks to Kung for this rip of the recent remaster. I lost my copy of the first CD pressing years ago, nice to have this again! Next up is Red Clay, my personal favorite. We lost a lot of great artists in 2008, so much so that I’m tired of eulogizing them. Rest well, Freddie…
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Freddie Hubbard – Backlash (1967) 320 kbs

01. Backlash [4:15]
02. The Return Of The Prodigal Son [5:43]
03. Little Sunflower [7:56]
04. Om The Que-Tee [5:48]
05. Up Jumped Spring [6:43]
06. Echoes Of Blues [9:45]

Freddie Hubbard – Trumpet & Fluegehorn
James Spaulding – Flaute & Alto sax
Albert Dailey – Piano
Bob Cunningham – Bass
Otis Ray Appleton – Drums
Ray Baretto – Percussion (1-3)

Review by Scott Yanow, AMG
The first of trumpeter Freddie Hubbard’s three Atlantic albums (reissued on a Koch CD in 2000), this excellent set falls between hard bop and the avant-garde, often hinting at both. Hubbard’s regular group of the time (with James Spaulding on alto and flute, pianist Albert Dailey, bassist Bob Cunningham, and drummer Otis Ray Appleton, plus guest conga player Ray Barretto) performs the debut version of his famous “Little Sunflower,” an excellent remake of “Up Jumped Spring,” and four lesser-known pieces. Hubbard and Spaulding made for an excellent team and there are plenty of exciting moments on this brief but potent set.

Rating: 4.5 Stars
Recording Date: Oct 19, 1966,Oct 24, 1966
Label: Koch
Time: 40:04
LabelAtlantic (2005)

01. Backlash [4:15] 02. The Return Of The Prodigal Son [5:43] 03. Little Sunflower [7:56] 04. Om The Que-Tee [5:48] 05. Up Jumped Spring [6:43] 06. Echoes Of Blues [9:45] Freddie Hubbard – Trumpet & Fluegehorn James Spaulding – Flaute & Alto sax Albert Dailey – Piano Bob Cunningham – Bass Otis Ray Appleton – Drums Ray Baretto – Percussion (1-3) Review by Scott Yanow, AMG The first of trumpeter Freddie Hubbard’s three Atlantic albums (reissued on a Koch CD in 2000), this excellent set falls between hard bop and the avant-garde, often hinting at both. Hubbard’s regular group of the time (with James Spaulding on alto and flute, pianist Albert Dailey, bassist Bob Cunningham, and drummer Otis Ray Appleton, plus guest conga player Ray Barretto) performs the debut version of his famous “Little Sunflower,” an excellent remake of “Up Jumped Spring,” and four lesser-known pieces. Hubbard and Spaulding made for an excellent team and there are plenty of exciting moments on this brief but potent set. Rating: 4.5 Stars Recording Date: Oct 19, 1966,Oct 24, 1966 Label: Koch Time: 40:04 LabelAtlantic (2005)”>
Download LINK

Eddie Kendricks – Eddie Kendricks (1973)

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Eddie Kendricks
Eddie Kendricks (1973)
Tamla / Motown T327L

1 Only Room for Two
2 Darling Come Back Home
3 Each Day I Cry a Little
4 Can’t Help What I Am
5. Keep on Truckin’
6 Any Day Now
7. Not on the Outside
8. Where Do You Go (Baby)

Eddie Kendricks – Eddie Kendricks (1973) in 320kbs em pee three

VINYL RIP – Technical Specs

Music Hall MMF.5 Turntable with Goldring 1012GX cartridge, Gyger II diamond stylus, and MK II XLR Ringmat –> Projekt Speedbox II -> Parasound Z Phono Preamp -> Marantz PMD 661 digital recorder at 24/96khz

Declicked on very light settings with Click Repair -> DC Offset and track splitting in Adobe Audition 2.0

Dithering to 16-bit in Adobe AUdition
Converted to FLAC and mp3 with DbPoweramp

Eddie Kendricks – Going Up In Smoke (1976) 320kbs

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This goes out to Agnes in Atlanta on her BIRTHDAY! Happy birthday, yo!!! Agnes is one of my oldest friends (by which I mean a friend I’ve held on to for years, not as in old age) We haven’t actually seen each other in years but hopefully that will change soon.

I can’t get enough of Mr. Kendricks lately. I DJ’d a party this Halloween and played two or three of his songs, and could have just played an entire hour-long set. All of his solo albums are fantastic. This will be the first of several I’ll post here. It’s actually taken from a boxset called “The Thin Man”. I’ve left the track numbering intact but changed the ID tags to reflect ‘Going Up In Smoke.’

LINK HERE

A typical AMG review that makes me say “whatever…” But it’s something:

Review by Lindsay Planer

Although the title could be interpreted to portend the relationship between Eddie Kendricks and his longtime record label, contextual and lyrical clues would suggest Goin’ Up In Smoke (1976) has a motif of triumph over tragedy. In many ways it is a continuation of the work that had begun on He’s A Friend (1976) with songwriter/arranger and multi-instrumentalist Norman Harris back at the helm of the same Philly-based Stigma Sound Studio with many musicians likewise making encore appearances.

With pop and soul music having been temporarily hijacked by disco, it stands to reason that Harris’ scores reflect the latest trend in pop music. All the more significant is that the title song joined “Goin’ Up In Smoke,” “Music Man,” “Born Again,” and “Thanks For The Memories” as they collectively sent the LP to a very respectable #11 on the recently created Dance/Disco survey.

That impressive accomplishment aside, in retrospect Kendricks does not seem well served by the aggressive brass section. He occasionally struggles to be heard over them. Or, perhaps producers intentionally buried the vocalist deep inside the mix as to not get in the way of the four-on-the floor beat. To a similar effect, the slow churning of “The Newness Is Gone” is awash in overbearing strings that sadly detract from the intimacy of the artist’s performance. While the heart is definitely in the right place, “Don’t You Want Light” is little more than an homage to “The Hustle” and again, does little to reveal the singer’s talent

Caroline Crawford – Nice and Soulful (1979) 320 kbs


Caroline Crawford – Nice And Soulful (1979)

www.dustygroove.com
A stunning set of soul tunes from the lovely Caroline Crawford — produced by Bohannon, and some of his best work from the time! Caroline’s got a great style that moves past other club singers of the time — much more soulful and sophisticated than simple disco diva styles, drenched in a deeper soul sound that grounds the album nicely in a strong tradition of 70s soul. The production is tight, but unobtrusive — a bit like some of the best work that Barry White did with singers of a similar style — and the whole album sparkles with a freshness that will make you say “Hey, why I have I been missing this one all these years?” Titles include “The Strut”, “I’ll Be Here For You”, “Havin Fun”, “Facts Of Life”, and “Love Me Or Leave Me Alone”.

Tracks
1. I’ll Be Here For You
2. Can’t Hold Me Back
3. Love Me Or Leave Me Alone
4. The Strut
5. The Facts Of Life
6. Havin’fun

Eugene McDaniels – Headless Heroes of the Apocalypse (1971) VBR

No time for a personalized review today but this one has been in the cue for a while and its about time I shared it. Heavenly and heavily minor-key dissonant cluster chord funk soul-jazz with bitingly droll lyrics, how can you go wrong? this It’s a lot of fun, you shouldn’t miss this! I would upload my vinyl copy of the follow up, ‘Outlaw’ but I have no time for a vinyl rip for the next… few years or so. Anyone who wants to contribute it, leave a message.

Song sample — SUPERMARKET BLUES
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EUGENE MCDANIELS
Headless Heroes of the Apocalypse
Released 1971 on Atlantic Records


(Wikipedia entry!)

Headless Heroes of the Apocalypse is an album of American soul music by artist Eugene McDaniels.

As with McDaniel’s previous album, this is not a typical Soul album, which can even be seen by the cover image (a picture of McDaniels screaming between two warring samurai).

This album dabbles in form between soul, Funk, jazz and even folk. In addition, it has been a collector’s item among rap music and rare groove enthusiasts since the early 90s when several of the songs were sampled by many hip hop producers including Pete Rock and Q-Tip.

Track listing

1. “The Lord is Back” – 3:19
2. “Jagger the Dagger” – 6:02
3. “Lovin’ Man” – 4:47
4. “Headless Heroes” – 3:32
5. “Susan Jane” – 2:10
6. “Freedom Death Dance” – 4:16
7. “Supermarket Blues” – 4:08
8. “The Parasite (For Buffy)” – 9:36

Personnel

* Harry Whitaker – piano
* Gary King – electric bass
* Miroslav vitous – acoustic bass
* Alphonse Mouzon – drums
* Richie Resnikoff – guitar
* Carla Cargill – female vocals

Review by John Duffy

When Headless Heroes of the Apocalypse was first released in 1971, so the legend goes, Spiro Agnew himself called Atlantic Records to complain about the album’s incendiary lyrics. Promotional efforts dried up, and since then, the album has become one of the great rare gems of the funk era. With this first-ever CD release from Label M, it is available again in all its strange, eclectic glory. McDaniels had earned his living as a producer and songwriter for artists like Roberta Flack and Gladys Knight, and was in all honesty not much of a singer, but somehow his clumsy lyrics and dry delivery combined to carry his message across. In an unthreatening manner that hardly warranted a call from the White House, McDaniels warns that man’s struggles against each other are pointless, as some dark sinister force controls us all (“Headless Heroes”), and that protest without action is futile (“no amount of dancing is going to make us free,” he sings in “Freedom Death Dance”). With a dry wit he recounts an episode of everyday racist brutality in “Supermarket Blues,” and finds simple carnal pleasures in the acoustic folk-flavored “Susan Jane.” It all gets wrapped up in an appealing stew that draws from rock, funk, folk, soul, and even free jazz. Considering the number of times McDaniels’ sinewy beats and chunky guitar riffs have been sampled over the years, it’s about time a proper re-release allowed listeners to hear the whole picture.