Nelson Angelo & Joyce (1972) 320 kbs

Nelson Angelo e Joyce
Released as Odeon SMOFB 3734 in 1972
Reissued in 2006 on Discos Mariposas, Argentina

This is a beautiful, haunting album. It captures the dreamy, wistful saudades of the Clube da Esquina album with its bucolic, pastoral stroll tinged with psychedelia. And no wonder — it features a great deal of the same people. Nelson Angelo wrote a lot of stuff on that record, along with Ronaldo Bastos and Marcio Borges, both represented here too. In all the hipster attention to Brazilian music that erupted since the late 90s, most attention has been payed to the Tropicalistas, a scene involving mostly Baianos working in São Paulo and then spreading to Rio. The Clube da Esquina hailed from Minas Gerais and gets sort of neglected, in spite of Milton Nascimento’s later fame as a ‘cross-over’ jazz-fusion-pop sensation. Between 1970 and 1976 this group of musicians all played on each other’s records and created some of the most effecting, textured sounds coming from anywhere in the world. I can’t recommend this enough, for fans of the Nascimento/Lo Borges “Clube da Esquina” record, for fans of Joyce’s body of work, for fans of Brazilian music in general, and just for lovers of other-worldly music from the early 70s! It’s short and sweet, and so is this description — I wish I had the time, or the words, worthy of this record. But it’s been ‘in the cue’ for a while and I just want to share it already…

Note: I made full art scans of this record, but I did it a long while ago at some resolution higher than 600 dpi, which means the art folder is 190MB… Most people don’t care that much, I think. If anybody really wants it, leave a comment and I’ll upload it and/or resize them down to 300 dpi for more manageable size (but you’ll have to wait about 3 weeks…)

Scientist – Rids the World of the Evil Curse of the Vampires (1981)



Scientist – Rids the World of the Evil Curse of the Vampires
dedicated to the sleepless and those who should have known better

The world is full of vampires who will suck you dry. They are fond of lies and conceit, and making you feel special — it is all cool calculation and manipulation, because they are drawn to the warmth of your blood. These beings have no conscience or sense of ethics as you and I who walk in daylight might recognize them. They do not need such scruples held dear by mortals because they live by another code, the code of the undead. Wake up now lest you believe in farflung romantic mythos of gothic glamour — They are the ultimate narcissists, only concerned with themselves, and rationalizing their behavior through complex, arcane dissimulation whereby they are never culpable for their actions or the effects they have on others. The other day we had some righteous roots riddims with which to chant down Babylon and yell “Get behind me, Satan!” but I discovered the exorcism was not complete. The vampires still walk the streets of this town, or dwell in walk-up apartments, hovering like vultures. They dress like students, they dress like housewives, or in a suit and tie. I tried to warn a lovely charming lass, but what I did not know is that she WAS one of the vampires. The thing about vampires, is once you have identified them as such, they turn on you. They will not harbor any who have penetrated the secret of their shallow superficiality. They thrive off the warmth of your blood because, in fact, they have no heart.

They will turn the hope within you into hate and bitterness, if you are not careful. It is better to realize that vampires are sustained by our imaginations, by the power we give to them to influence our lives. At the root, they are nothing. Once you realize this truth in your heart, they cease to exist for you and return to the shadows to be summoned by another who is not vigilant. They prey on the lonely and the vulnerable. Warn your friends, if you care for them at all.

Note: If you sleep with a vampire, male or female, you should really go get a blood test. They are known to be profligate and, usually, dishonest in their liaisons. Do not beat yourself up too badly, we all slip up sometime.

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Linval Thompson – Rocking Vibration (1978)

I personally lead a drug-free life these days (except for the meds that keep me from hearing voices), but that does not stop me from appreciating the amazing music brought to us by the guy who recorded “I Love Marijuana.” At the moment I live in a world of vampires and infidels, and to ward them off I try to always adorn myself with garlic and also crank the righteous roots reggae. It is good to chant down Babylon with this album, with Sly and Robbie laying the foundation. Note that Makasound changed the running order of the original album.

“I’m going to get myself together, just like the angel above the sky, just like the twelve disciples of Jerusalem, I’m going to get myself together because I’m gonna move it on, I’m gonna groove it on, so groove with me my brothers, groove with me my sisters..”

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Linval Thompson – Rocking Vibration (1978)
320 kbs – baixar aqui!

1 Never Push Your Brother
2 Freedom Fighters
3 Rocking Vibration
4 More Power
5 I Got to Have You
6 No Confusion
7 Black Woman
8 Rasta Children
9 Dangerous Position
10 No More Problems
11 Jah Jah a Do It
12 Super Star
13 Just Another Girl
14 Mr Bossman
15 Dont Pust Me Around
16 Give Thanks and Praises
17 Natty Pressure Them

All tracks recorded between 1975 & 1979
Studio : Channel One, Black Ark, King Tubby’s
Engineers : Scientist, Lee Perry, King Tubby, Brad Osborne, Douglas Levy.
Musicians : Robbie Shakespear, Lloyd byks, Aston “Familyman” Barret, Sly Dunbar, Carlton “Santa” Davis, Leroy “Horsemouth” Wallace, Earl “Chinna” Smith, Tony Chin, Ossie, Ansel Collins, Skully …

Review by Rick Anderson

Over the past several years, the French Makasound label has been unearthing an impressive amount of obscure but top-quality roots reggae from the 1970s. This particular collection draws on the work of singer, songwriter, and producer Linval Thompson between 1977 and 1979; the songs compiled here were all recorded at Channel One and mixed at King Tubby’s studio — with the exception of the album’s real find, a previously unreleased song titled “Natty Pressure Them,” which Thompson recorded at the Black Ark studio with Lee “Scratch” Perry. Frankly, that song is of more historical than musical interest; it’s not bad, but not terribly exciting either, with unusually restrained and almost lackluster production from Perry. But several other tracks shine quite brightly: “Black Woman” is a fine piece of vintage lovers rock, and “Rasta Children” finds Thompson working in a solid rockers vein. He does a creditable job on the Ken Boothe classic “Just Another Girl,” and his one-drop sufferer’s anthem, “More Power,” is also impressive. A couple of tracks (notably “Jah Jah a Do It”) suffer from poor sound quality, but overall this is a welcome contribution to a solid catalog of lovingly prepared compilations from reggae’s golden period. Recommended.

Henry Cow – Western Culture (1979)

This is a very important record by one of my favorite bands, Henry cow from England. A bit different from what usually is posted on this blog, I originally had wanted to share this yesterday to protest American Labor Day, a holiday established to offset May Day and undermine the Labor Movement. All of Henry Cow’s recorded output is worthwhile, but this is by far their most outstanding creative achievement. I would write a review but I found a more than adequate one from when this album was finally reissued, by Peter Marsh at the BBC, posted below the album info.

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HENRY COW
“Western Culture”
Released in 1979
Baixar Aqui!

Track Listings

1. Industry (6:58)
2. The Decay of Cities (6:56)
3. On The Raft (4:01)
4. Falling Away (7:39)
5. Gretel’s Tale (3:58)
6. Look Back (1:20)
7. 1/2 the Sky (5:14)

Total Time: 36:06

8. “Untitled” (silence only) – 1:29
9. “Viva Pa Ubu” (Hodgkinson) – 4:28
10. “Look Back (alt)” (Cooper) – 1:21
11. “Slice” (Cooper) – 0:36

“Viva Pa Ubu” includes the singing of Dagmar Krause, making the extended album no longer an instrumental.

“Viva Pa Ubu” and “Slice” had been previously released on the Recommended Records Sampler (1982).

Line-up/Musicians

– Tim Hodgkinson / organs, Alto sax, clarinet, Hawaiian guitar (1,2), piano (3)
– Lindsay Cooper / bassoon, oboe, Soprano sax, Sopranino recorders
– Fred Frith / electric & acoustic guitars, bass, Soprano sax (3)
– Chris Cutler / drums, electric drums, noise, piano (4), trumpet (3)

Guests:
– Anne-Marie Roelofs / trombone, violin
– Irene Schweizer / piano (5)
– Georgie Born / bass (7)

Sound and art work

* Henry Cow – Producers
* Etienne Conod – Producer
* Chris Cutler – Cover art

Review
…exhausting, sometimes jaw droppingly gorgeous and occasionally very scary…

by Peter Marsh
20 November 2002

While most 70s progressive rockers had their noses stuck deep in the works of Herman Hesse or Tolkien and spent their time copping licks from Ravel or Mussorgsky, the members of Henry Cow were reading Marx, Mao and Walter Benjamin and preferred Varese, Cage or Sun Ra for inspiration. One of the first signings to Virgin records in 1973, the Cow were responsible for some of the most dazzlingly complex rock ever recorded, merging British psychedelia, free improvisation and modern classical with a healthy dose of revolutionary polemic. The band gained a reputation for immense seriousness depite their occasional sly Dadaist humour, though to be fair there pobably weren’t many fart jokes in the Henry Cow tour bus.

Western Culture was recorded in 1978 some time after their difficult split with Virgin, and was made in the knowledge that the group was to fold afterwards (a previous attempt at recording had failed a few months earlier). Though these were obviously tricky times for all concerned, you wouldn’t know it from the music on this CD, which is some of their finest and dispatched with awesome precision and economy.

Compositional duties are split between saxophonist/keyboardist Tim Hodgkinson and bassoonist Lindsay Cooper (possibly the only ever fulltime bassoonist in a rock band). Their dense, cerebral compositions are restless, angular affairs with nervy, timeshifting rhythmic dexterity from drummer Chris Cutler (who has to be one of the finest, most inventive drummers this country has ever produced) and guitarist Fred Frith (doubling on bass). Frith is superb, switching from fuzzed out, oblique rockisms to querulous Derek Bailey acoustic scrabble (“The Decay of Cities”) and occupying a few thousand points inbetween. There are no pointless displays of prog virtuosity though; despite the sometimes bewildering complexity of the music, not a note is wasted throughout.

Guest pianist Irene Schweizer provides a spot of free jazz fire on Coopers doleful “Gretel’s Tale”, while Anne Marie Roeloffs’s trombone and violin add extra textural grit. The most affecting track is “Half the Sky”, where lush chords underpin Friths Frippish glides and Hodgkinsons chattering alto sax, eventually breaking out into an almost klezmer-esque melody over Cutler’s tumbling percussives. Three extra tracks round off this long unavailable re-issue including “Viva Pa Ubu” (featuring former vocalist Dagmar Krause, here uncredited) and the all too short cut and thrust of “Slice”. Exhausting, sometimes jaw droppingly gorgeous and occasionally very scary, Western Culture is a fitting testament to possibly the most progressive of all English rock bands. Bless ’em.

Bollywood Funk

Various Artists – Bollywood Funk (2001)
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Little is known about this compilation of Bollywood soundtrack cuts. The liner notes are not helpful at all – they don’t even reference the films these are from, let alone the artists. Even the discogs website has no idea. There is a review over at AMG but I prefer not to put it here because I don’t like to support their hack music journalism over there, and the review is particularly bad in it’s smarmy indie-boy kind of way. This is a great compilation, not necessarily “funk” but definitely funky and also pretty psychedelic, ranging (I’m guessing) from the mid-60s through the early 70s. Anyone who can help out with more info, please leave some comments!

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Cartola – O mundo é um moinho (1976)

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Cartola
O mundo é um moinho
1976 Discos Marcus Pereira

1. O Mundo É Um Moinho
2. Minha
3. Sala De Recepção
4. Não Posso Viver Sem Ela
5. Preciso Me Encontrar
6. Peito Vazio
7. Aconteceu
8. As Rosas Não Falam
9. Sei Chorar
10. Ensaboa Mulata
11. Senhora Tentação
12. Cordas De Aço

The opening title track was written for Cartola’s daughter who left their home in Mangueira at 16 and (in the story I’ve heard, anyway) ended up working as a prostitute. It’s a classic, as is all of this record and especially ‘Sala de recepção’, ‘Aconteceu’, ‘Preciso me encontrar’, ‘As rosas não falam’… So many great songs!! Although Cartola had been instrumental to the development of samba during the 1930s and ran the most famous samba club in Rio with his wife Zica beginning in the early 60s, he did not record any material until the age of 66. This is his second album. You can read more about Cartola in a brief article at Wikipedia here, which is also where I grabbed the lyrics and a decent translation of the above mentioned track. I don’t think I really understood samba until I heard Cartola’s first two records. Ever since then, I’ve been in love with the art form. This is samba at it’s best, period.

O mundo é um moinho

Ainda é cedo, amor.
Mal começaste a conhecer a vida,
Já anuncias a hora de partida
Sem saber mesmo o rumo que irás tomar.

Preste atenção, querida,
Embora eu saiba que estás resolvida.
Em cada esquina cai um pouco tua vida.
Em pouco tempo não serás mais o que és.

Ouça-me bem, amor.
Preste atenção, o mundo é um moinho.
Vai triturar teus sonhos tão mesquinhos,
Vai reduzir as ilusões a pó.

Preste atenção, querida.
De cada amor tu herdarás só o cinismo.
Quando notares estás à beira do abismo.
Abismo que cavaste com teus pés.

Translation:

It’s still early, love.
You’ve barely started to know life,
You already announce the hour of departure
Without even knowing the direction you’ll take.

Pay attention, dear,
Although I know that you made up your mind
In each corner falls a little your life
Soon you’ll no longer be what you are.

Listen carefully, love.
Pay attention, the world is a mill.
It will grind your paltry dreams,
It will reduce your illusions to dust.

Pay attention, dear.
From each love, you’ll inherit only cynicism.
When you notice, you’re at the edge of the abyss.
Abyss you dug with your own feet.