Gillian Welch – Time (The Revelator) (2001) 320kbs

Gillian Welch
Time (The Revelator) 320kbs
Released 2001

I’ve had a lot of insomnia this year. Dark nights of the soul or something like that. A few things have gotten me through those nights more or less intact — the records of Anne Briggs, Bert Jansch, Nick Drake, certain Indian ragas, an ambient project called Mirror, and this record from Gillian Welch and David Rawlings. This is my favorite of hers. I feel it’s her most honest and heartfelt, away from her old-timey Appalachian revivalism and towards pure musical expression. A different kind of gooseflesh soul music for the twilight hours. When you listen closely, “I Dream A Highway” is the shortest folk song you will ever hear, ringing out unlike anything you knew before or since. This record has kept me company when I had no other. I hope it helps someone else out there too.

1. Revelator
2. My First Lover
3. Dear Someone
4. Red Clay Halo
5. April the 14th Part 1
6. I Want So Sing That Rock and Roll
7. Elvis Presley Blues
8. Ruination Day Part 2
9. Everything Is Free
10. I Dream a Highway

Gilberto Gil – Refavela (1977) 320kbs

Gilberto Gil
Refavela (1977)
320 kbs

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This is a highly underrated album, a result of Gil’s trip to Lagos with Caetano Veloso. Caetano recorded “Bicho”, also a classic, but this record holds its own against it any day. In my opinion, this is the last of Gil’s records that you can truly call a “classic.” It’s groundbreaking stuff that presages “world music” but the production values here are still nice, warm, and analog (no Peter Gabriel “Real World studios” sounding stuff here!).

Contains complete artwork!!

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Review by Philip Jandovský

Unlike his friend and fellow Brazilian musical legend, Caetano Veloso, Gilberto Gil, through the years, has had a strong tendency to follow the temporary shifts in styles and trends that occur within popular music. Because of this the music of Gil usually has sounded very up to date when it was released, but often his recordings haven’t at all aged as gracefully as the timeless music of Caetano Veloso. The tracks on many of the albums of Gilberto Gil have also been of very uneven quality. Refavela is clearly one of the exceptions to this rule. Heavily inspired by traditional African and Afro-Brazilian sounds and rhythms, the songs on this album have aged very well indeed. The title of the album, Refavela, of course, refers to the slum quarters found in the large Brazilian cities, which are called favelas. Among the more famous songs on this album are the beautiful title track, “Refavela,” the funky “Babá Alapalá,” and the Afro-Brazilian rhythmic “Patuscada de Gandhi” and “Ilê Ayê.” There is also a cover of Tom Jobim’s “Samba do Avião.” Refavela is, without doubt, one of the most consistent and probably the best of all albums recorded by Gilberto Gil.

Pat Kelly – Talk About Love (1978)

This is a vinyl rip, a little lower resolution than I usually like, but the music so, so sweet…

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Pat Kelly – Talk About Love (download here!)
Terminal LP #TMLP 1001 1978
Record date : 1978

Album style : roots, lovers, solo vocal

Playlist :
To Each His Own
I Am So Proud
Coming Home
Stoned In Love
Never Get To Heaven
Talk About Love
Little Boy Blue
I’ve Been Trying
I Don’t Want To Go
Summer Time

Producer : Phil Pratt

Engineer : Ernest Hoo Kim

Vocals : Pat Kelly
Drums : Sly Dunbar
Bass : Robbie Shakespeare
Lead Guitar : Bo Peep
Rhythm Guitar : Robbie Shakespeare
Keyboards : Touter Harvey & Bobby Kalphat & Ossie Hibbert
Percussions : Sticky & Scully Simms

Studios :
Recording : Channel One (Kingston, JA)

Hugh Masekela – The Chisa Years (2006)


Hugh Masekela
THE CHISA YEARS (Rare and Unreleased)
2006 BBE Records

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Review by Thom Jurek

Hugh Masekela and Stewart Levine met in 1961 at the Manhattan School of Music. They became friends, roommates, and collaborators. They began experimenting with putting together groups of African singers, studio musicians, and a fusion of South African township jive and urban gospel. The two started the CHISA label together in 1966 just before the pair scored big with Masekela’s smash, “Grazin’ in the Grass.” After the success of that track, they put more money into their label, and scored a distribution deal with Motown. The 14 sides here, on Chisa Years: 1965-1975 (Rare and Unreleased) are little known or forgotten tracks from the CHISA years. It’s true that the Crusaders recorded for CHISA in this period, but there are no tracks by them on this set — though most of the band appear here in one form or another. None of Masekela’s hits are here either. And it’s just as well. What is collected on this disc is a vibrant slew of cuts recorded by the pair. First there’s the smoking “Afro Beat Blues,” by Masekela and his band Ojah, who hailed from places like Nigeria and Ghana, that had been recruited during a successful African tour in 1973. The players had been introduced by Fela Kuti in Lagos. Other cuts here include the stunning “Mahalela,” “U Se Mcani,” “Macongo,” and “Melodi (Sounds of Home),” by Letta Mbulu. These are unreleased cuts from her debut and second albums from 1970 and ’73, respectively. The band includes four members of the Crusaders, Arthur Adams, Wayne West, Masekela, and Francisco Aguabella on percussion. The latter track is one of the most joyous and successful attempts to pull together the world of soul and township jive ever. Elsewhere, on “Amo Sakesa” by Baranta (featuring the great vocalist Miatta Fahnbulleh) funk grooves meet the music of the Soweto street in glorious aplomb. The four selections by Baranta are the most adventurous on the set. (Check the fuzz guitar, Nigerian funk bass line, and staggered drum breaks in “Ahvuomo.”) There are three tracks here by the Zulus. All of these register from the earliest sessions. This group included Mbulu as well as Caiphus Semenya, and contained seven vocalists as well as a rhythm section. Dig the hard-driving hand drum grooves in “Za Labalaba.” The polish and sophistication of the sounds in this song are literally astonishing, and prove a perfect, seamless meeting of American gospel and South African street music, but a close second is “Aredze,” with breezy Les Paul-styled guitar by Bruce Langhorn. The gospel piano in “Awe Mfana,” by the Johannesburg Street Band sidles up magnificently to the horns played by Masekela, the Crusaders’ Wilton Felder, and Wayne Henderson, and Al Abreus with tight Steve Cropper-styled guitar by Arthur Adams. In sum, there isn’t a weak moment on this entire collection. It’s appeal is wide and deep and one can only hope this is the first of many volumes of this material to appear. BBE Records has done a stellar job in making this slab available.

Muhal Richard Abrams – Levels and Degrees of Light (1967) 320 kbs


Muhal Richard Abrams – Levels And Degrees Of Light (1967) 320 kbs {DD 413}

Review by Brian Olewnick (allmusic.com)
Levels and Degrees of Light was the first recording under Muhal Richard Abrams’ name and was a landmark album that launched the first in a long line of beautiful, musical salvos from the AACM toward the mainstream jazz world. The title track finds Abrams broadly tracing out some of the territory he would continue to explore in succeeding decades, an ethereal, mystic quality (evinced by Penelope Taylor’s otherworldly vocalizing and Gordon Emmanuel’s shimmering vibes) balanced by a harsh and earthy bluesiness set forth by the leader’s piercing clarinet. “The Bird Song” begins with a fine, dark poetry recitation by David Moore (oh! for the days when one didn’t approach a poem on a jazz album with great trepidation) before evanescing into a whirlwind of percussion, bird whistles, and violin (the latter by Leroy Jenkins in one of his first recorded appearances). When the band enters at full strength with Anthony Braxton (in his first recording session), the effect is explosive and liberating, as though Abrams’ band had stood on the shoulders of Coltrane, Coleman, and Taylor and taken a massive, daring leap into the future. It’s a historic performance. The final track offers several unaccompanied solo opportunities, spotlighting Abrams’ sumptuous piano and the under-recognized bass abilities of Charles Clark. This is a milestone recording and belongs in the collection of any modern jazz fan.

Tracks
1. Levels And Degrees Of Light
2. The Bird Song
3. My Thoughts Are My Future-Now And Forever

Nelson Angelo & Joyce (1972) 320 kbs

Nelson Angelo e Joyce
Released as Odeon SMOFB 3734 in 1972
Reissued in 2006 on Discos Mariposas, Argentina

This is a beautiful, haunting album. It captures the dreamy, wistful saudades of the Clube da Esquina album with its bucolic, pastoral stroll tinged with psychedelia. And no wonder — it features a great deal of the same people. Nelson Angelo wrote a lot of stuff on that record, along with Ronaldo Bastos and Marcio Borges, both represented here too. In all the hipster attention to Brazilian music that erupted since the late 90s, most attention has been payed to the Tropicalistas, a scene involving mostly Baianos working in São Paulo and then spreading to Rio. The Clube da Esquina hailed from Minas Gerais and gets sort of neglected, in spite of Milton Nascimento’s later fame as a ‘cross-over’ jazz-fusion-pop sensation. Between 1970 and 1976 this group of musicians all played on each other’s records and created some of the most effecting, textured sounds coming from anywhere in the world. I can’t recommend this enough, for fans of the Nascimento/Lo Borges “Clube da Esquina” record, for fans of Joyce’s body of work, for fans of Brazilian music in general, and just for lovers of other-worldly music from the early 70s! It’s short and sweet, and so is this description — I wish I had the time, or the words, worthy of this record. But it’s been ‘in the cue’ for a while and I just want to share it already…

Note: I made full art scans of this record, but I did it a long while ago at some resolution higher than 600 dpi, which means the art folder is 190MB… Most people don’t care that much, I think. If anybody really wants it, leave a comment and I’ll upload it and/or resize them down to 300 dpi for more manageable size (but you’ll have to wait about 3 weeks…)